DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘University of Michigan’

STEM CELL VACCINE IN DEVELOPMENT TO FIGHT CANCER

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 10, 2013 at 9:00 am

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Cancer Stem Cell Vaccine in Development Shows Anti-tumor Effect

Philadelphia – Scientists may have discovered a new paradigm for immunotherapy against cancer by priming antibodies and T cells with cancer stem cells, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.”

“This is a major breakthrough in immunotherapy research because we were able to use purified cancer stem cells to generate a vaccine, which strengthened the potency of antibodies and T cells that selectively targeted cancer stem cells.  We found that these enriched cancer stem cells were immunogenic and far more effective as an antigen source compared with the unselected tumor cells normally used in previous immunotherapy trials. The mechanistic investigations found that when antibodies were primed with cancer stem cells, they were capable of targeting cancer stem cells and conferring anti-tumor immunity.”

–          Qiao Li, Ph.D., a research assistant professor, department of surgery, University of Michigan.

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The researchers also found that cytotoxic T lymphocytes harvested from cancer stem cell-vaccinated hosts were capable of killing cancer stem cells in vitro.”

http://www.aacr.org/home/public–media/aacr-press-releases.aspx?d=2744

Journal Reference:  Cancer Stem Cell Vaccination Confers Significant Antitumor Immunity. Cancer Research, 2012; 72 (7): 1853 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-1400

Cardiac muscle patches made from stem cells

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 21, 2012 at 2:01 pm
Old news but good news~!
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Cardiac muscle patches made from stem cells

A cutting-edge method developed at the University of Michigan Center for Arrhythmia Research successfully uses stem cells to create heart cells capable of mimicking the heart’s crucial squeezing action.

The cells displayed activity similar to most people’s resting heart rate. At 60 beats per minute, the rhythmic electrical impulse transmission of the engineered cells in the U-M study is 10 times faster than in most other reported stem cell studies.

An image of the electrically stimulated cardiac cells is displayed on the cover of the current issue of Circulation Research, a publication of the American Heart Association.

For those suffering from common, but deadly, heart diseases, stem cell biology represents a new medical frontier…

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