DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘trachea’

STEM CELLS HIT MAIN STREAM MEDIA!

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 27, 2014 at 9:03 pm

STEM CELLS HIT MAIN STREAM MEDIA! 
On NBC tonight at 8pm EST!

The first stem cell generated windpipe was implanted in 2008.
Six long years later, the technique has been improved significantly and has hit main stream media. 

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“Macchiarini’s team began by collecting stem cells from Beyene’s bone marrow. Those cells were mixed with special growth factors and then poured onto a scaffold made from plastic — in fact, the very same plastic that is used to make soda bottles — which had been made to mimic the shape of a real windpipe.  In just a matter of days, the scaffold began to transform into an actual functioning windpipe.”

Some attack those pushing the boundaries, citing that the surgery is experimental and unproven.  But the Dr can’t stand by as patients die when he can do something about it and can’t ignore their pleas for a chance at the hope of recovery.  This is cutting edge of medicine and there are thousands of clinical trials and studies and 10s to 100s of thousands of patients treated, most outside of the US.  There are no guarantees.  There are always risks, even with rigorously tested pharmaceutical drugs and treatment protocols that have been used for decades.  But for chronic and terminal patients who are given no chance for recovery, experimental sounds like a pretty great option.

Historically, new treatments have always been met with resistance.

“Tom Starzl, when he started doing liver transplants, the first seven, eight, nine patients all died. Everybody said he was nuts, OK? Christian Barnard, when he started doing heart transplants, everyone threw rocks at him. This is how we’re going to treat diseases in the future and this is the start of it.”

Anything which pushes the envelop of contemporary knowledge will be rejected by those clinging to traditional concepts…but without pioneering doctors and even more pioneering patients, willing to take risks, medical protocols can not advance.  I salute the doctor and the patients who are the ground-breaking pioneers in the new land of regenerative medicine.  And what can their mutual risk do for the patient and millions to follow?

“One of Macchiarini’s most promising success stories is Claudia Castillo, a Spanish mother who is doing so well six years after her transplant that an increasing number of Macchiarini’s colleagues are beginning to see him in a new light.”

Thank you!

To watch the video and learn more:

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/leap-faith-desperate-patients-look-lab-grown-organs-n142036

CHILD RECEIVES NEW STEM CELL TRACHEA

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 30, 2013 at 2:44 pm
ht_ciaran_finn_lynch_trachea_transplant_ll_120725_wg

Two years ago, 11 year old Ciaran Finn-Lynch, became the world’s first child to receive new trachea.  Scientists/doctors used the child’s own stem cells to rebuild the airway in his body.  This is the really cool stuff because the public can wrap their heads around it and see a trachea in a dish, a nose growing on an arm, etc.  The next step in evolution of the public consciousness is to get them to understand…we can regrow and heal the organs which are already present in their own bodies, already damaged and in need of fixing…with stem cells from their own body.  I think this will be difficult as the home owner with the means will almost always go to the outside plumber or the super store and get a new piece of equipment to replace the old rather than pick up a wrench and fix what they have already.  Another byproduct of the disposable society we live in.  Homes, cars, washing machines and now organs are believed to have a limited life span.  When it breaks, just buy a new one.  – DG

Here’s the article from ScienceDaily:

Surgeons Transplant New Trachea Into Child Using His Own Stem Cells to Rebuild Airway

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100325114400.htm

Which was written based on materials from the University College of London release (what, you thought this was in the US?):

UCL surgeons perform revolutionary transplant operation

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1003/10031903

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Here’s the 2 year follow-up:

Stem-cell-based, tissue engineered tracheal replacement in a child: a 2-year follow-up study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22841419

And the human interest story coverage of the same:

Stunning Recovery for First Child to Get Stem Cell Trachea

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/stunning-recovery-child-stem-cell-trachea/story?id=16858771

ADULT STEM CELLS USED TO SUCCESSFULLY REBUILD A HUMAN TRACHEA

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 20, 2013 at 9:03 am

trachea

Tissue-Engineered Trachea Transplant Is Adult Stem Cell Breakthrough

The first tissue-engineered trachea (windpipe), utilizing the patient’s own stem cells, has been successfully transplanted into a young woman with a failing airway. The bio-engineered trachea immediately provided the patient with a normally functioning airway, thereby saving her life.  These remarkable results provide crucial new evidence that adult stem cells, combined with biologically compatible materials, can offer genuine solutions to other serious illnesses.  In particular, the successful outcome shows it is possible to produce a tissue-engineered airway with mechanical properties that permit normal breathing and which is free from the risks of rejection seen with conventional transplanted organs. The patient has not developed antibodies to her graft, despite not taking any immunosuppressive drugs. Lung function tests performed two months after the operation were all at the better end of the normal range for a young woman.

The loss of a normal airway is devastating, but previous attempts to replace large airways have met serious problems. The 30-year-old mother of two, suffering from collapsed airways following a severe case of TB, was hospitalized in March 2008 with acute shortness of breath rendering her unable to carry out simple domestic duties or care for her children. The only conventional option remaining was a major operation to remove her left lung which carries a risk of complications and a high mortality rate.  Based on successful laboratory work previously performed by the team, and given the urgency of the situation, it was proposed that the lower trachea and the tube to the patient’s left lung (bronchus) should be replaced with a bio-engineered airway based on the scaffold of a human trachea.

A seven-centimeter tracheal segment was donated by a 51-year-old transplant donor who had who had died of cerebral hemorrhage. Spain has a policy of assumed consent for organ donation. Using a new technique developed in Padua University, the trachea was decellularised over a six-week period so that no donor cells remained.  Stem cells were obtained from the recipient’s own bone marrow, grown into a large population in Professor Martin Birchall’s lab at the University of Bristol, and matured into cartilage cells (chondrocytes) using an adapted method originally devised for treating osteoarthritis

The donor trachea was then seeded with chondrocytes on the outside, using a novel bio-reactor which incubates cells, allowing them to migrate into the tissue under conditions ideal for each individual cell type. In order to replicate the lining of the trachea, epithelial cells were seeded onto the inside of the trachea using the same bio-reactor.  Four days after seeding, the graft was used to replace the patient’s left main bronchus. The operation was performed in June 2008 at the Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, by Professor Paolo Macchiarini of the University of Barcelona.

Professor Macchiarini, lead author on the paper, said: “We are terribly excited by these results. Just four days after transplantation the graft was almost indistinguishable from adjacent normal bronchi. After one month, a biopsy elicited local bleeding, indicating that the blood vessels had already grown back successfully”.

Martin Birchall, Professor of Surgery at the University of Bristol, added: “Surgeons can now start to see and understand the very real potential for adult stem cells and tissue engineering to radically improve their ability to treat patients with serious diseases. We believe this success has proved that we are on the verge of a new age in surgical care”.

Anthony Hollander, Professor of Rheumatology and Tissue Engineering at the University of Bristol, concurred: “This successful treatment manifestly demonstrates the potential of adult stem cells to save lives”.

The patient, Claudia Castillo, a young woman from Colombia but now living in Spain, had no complications from the operation and was discharged from hospital on the tenth post-operative day. She has remained well since and has a normal quality of life. She is able to care for her children, walk up two flights of stairs and occasionally go out dancing in the evenings.

http://www.science20.com

Surgeons Implant Synthetic Trachea in Baltimore Man – NYTimes.com

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 14, 2012 at 9:24 am

Surgeons Implant Synthetic Trachea in Baltimore Man – NYTimes.com.

Surgeons in Sweden have replaced the cancerous windpipe of a Maryland man with one made in a laboratory and seeded with the man’s cells.

Thomas Grosse/Harvard Bioscience

In only the second procedure of its kind, surgeons in Sweden have replaced the cancerous windpipe of a Maryland man with one fabricated in a laboratory, shown here, before being seeded with his own cells.

The windpipe, or trachea, made from minuscule plastic fibers and covered in stem cells taken from the man’s bone marrow, was implanted in November. The patient, Christopher Lyles, 30, whose tracheal cancer had progressed to the point where it was considered inoperable, arrived home in Baltimore on Wednesday. It was the second procedure of its kind and the first for an American.

“I’m feeling good,” Mr. Lyles said in a telephone interview from his home, where he was playing with his 4-year-old daughter. “I’m just thankful for a second chance at life.” He said he hoped to resume his job, as an electrical engineer with the Department of Defense, as soon as he regained full strength.

“He went home in very good shape,” said Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, director of the Advanced Center for Translational Regenerative Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm..

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