DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘sugar’

LYME DISEASE UPDATE (good news!)

In DISEASE INFO, HEALTH AND WELLNESS, HOPE AND INSPIRATION, OFF THE BEATEN PATH, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 14, 2017 at 2:23 pm
LYME DISEASE UPDATE:
One of the many problems with the Lyme disease bacteria is that when under attack, they can coat themselves with a biofilm. Think ‘getting slimed from ghostbusters…

bill-murray-ghostbusters-slimed

…in fact:
 
“A biofilm is any group of microorganisms in which cells stick to each other and often these cells adhere to a surface. Biofilm is a polymeric conglomeration generally composed of extracellular DNA, proteins, and polysaccharides. These adherent cells are frequently embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) which may also be referred to as SLIME (although not everything described as slime is a biofilm).” wiki
 
Is this mucous-y armor-y biofilm strong? Strong enough to withstand the antibiotics used to kill them and tadpole biofilm has even been found intact from the Miocene era so, yeah. Lyme disease bacteria can morph back and forth into this armor-like biofilm when attacked and remove it when it is going about its normal (destructive) life cycle. In fact, antibiotics like doxycycline, the standard treatment for Lyme disease, actually trigger the bacteria into producing this biofilm armor.

“The culprit behind Lyme disease, which is a bacterial infection, is spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The antibiotics proven to kill this form of bacteria are doxycycline and amoxicillin. However, Borrelia burgdorferi can be found in morphological forms, including spirochetes, spheroplast (or L-form), round bodies, and biofilms. When conditions are considered unfavourable for the bacteria, it morphs into the dormant round body, then hides in a biofilm form. When conditions are favourable, however, it can shift back to its spirochete form.”
 
So what’s a Lyme disease sufferer to do when THE TREATMENT essentially STRENGTHENS the antibiotic resistance of the PATHOGEN?
lyme-disease-What-should-I-
THE GOOD NEWS:
A new study shows there is increased hope for Lyme disease sufferers. The use of Stevia, a common sugar, has been fond to destroy the biofilm. Taking STEVIA and ANTIBIOTICS will destroy the biofilm and the bacteria more effectively:

“Subculture experiments with Stevia and antibiotics treated cells were established for 7 and 14 days yielding, no and 10% viable cells, respectively compared to the above-mentioned antibiotics and antibiotic combination. When Stevia and the three antibiotics were tested against attached biofilms, Stevia significantly reduced B. burgdorferi forms. Results from this study suggest that a natural product such as Stevia leaf extract could be considered as an effective agent against B. burgdorferi.”

 
“Stevia Kills Lyme Disease Pathogen Better Than Antibiotics, Study Confirms – http://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/01/25/study-finds-stevia-kills-lyme-disease-pathogen-better-than-antibiotics/
 
 
 

Medical News: Stem Cells Help in Type 1 Diabetes – in Endocrinology, Diabetes from MedPage Today

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 12, 2012 at 9:33 pm

Medical News: Stem Cells May Help in Type 1 Diabetes – in Endocrinology, Diabetes from MedPage Today.

Action Points  


    • A study in 15 patients, 12 of whom received the treatment, found that lymphocytes “re-educated” by passage with cord blood stem cells, were effective in treating patients with type 1 diabetes with and without residual beta cell function.
  • Both insulin requirements and glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly in the treated patients with effects lasting out to 40 weeks.

Therapy using the patient’s lymphocytes passed through a device with cord blood stem cells may “educate” the patient’s cells to provide safe, lasting treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes, according to the results of a small Chinese study.

Those patients with moderate diabetes and some residual beta cell function (Group A) exhibited improved fasting C-peptide levels at 12 and 24 weeks post-treatment, Yong Zhao, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues reported online in BMC Medicine.

Patients with more severe disease and no residual beta cell function (Group B) also showed improvement at every follow-up…

No Wedding Day for Jay Cutler – Diabetes

In ALL ARTICLES on October 24, 2011 at 6:59 pm

No Wedding Day for Jay

by on July 26, 2011 in Entertainment, Sports

It appears Jay Cutler will not be walking down the aisle next spring. The Chicago Bears quarterback broke off his engagement to The Hills star, Kristin Cavallari just weeks before the start of football season. Cutler, now 28, was diagnosed with diabetes three years ago. He has Type 1, sometimes referred to as “juvenile diabetes,” which is a misnomer. While the onset typically occurs in children and adolescents, people of any age can be affected. Cutler himself was 25. He exhibited all the classic signs of diabetes: weight loss (he went from 238 pounds to 203 in a few short months), frequent urination, insatiable thirst, and lack of energy. As a result of untreated diabetes, his game suffered. It was not until a routine blood test (required to participate in offseason training), that Cutler learned he had diabetes.

Diabetes, generally speaking, is a condition in which the body’s cells do not receive adequate supply of sugar, in particular, a sugar called glucose. When our food is digested,  glucose makes its way into our bloodstream. Our cells use the glucose for energy and growth. But glucose cannot enter our cells without insulin. It is insulin which enables our cells to take in glucose. Without insulin, the sugar levels in the bloodstream rise.

Cutler’s adult-onset type 1 diabetes highlights the importance of distinguishing the three different types of diabetes:

Type 1 may more accurately be termed “insulin-dependent” diabetes. This is because people with the condition require daily, subcutaneous injections of insulin for the rest of their lives. In type 1, the body’s immune system attacks cells in the pancreas that make insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is sometimes referred to as “adult diabetes.” This is another misconception. In fact, recent studies conducted by the CDC have found that children and teenagers are being diagnosed with the disease at an alarming rate. About 95% of those children were obese at the time of diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin, suffers from “insulin resistance”, or both.  Insulin resistance means that the cells no longer respond properly to the insulin present.  An unhealthy weight is a major risk factor.

A third type, gestational diabetes, occurs in pregnant women, and is usually temporary. Complications can still endanger the health of the woman and her fetus.

There is also an uncommon medical condition called diabetes insipidus which actually has nothing to do with insulin. In diabetes insipidus, the kidneys are unable to conserve water as they filter blood. This problem arises either directly from the kidney, or from a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, which produces a hormone, called ADH, that controls water conservation.

Despite the differences between type 1 and 2, the complications are often the same. The higher the blood sugars over an extended period of time, the greater the risk for complications such as blindness, stroke, nerve damage,  limb amputation, kidney failure, and premature death.

Celebrities with Diabetes (type 1 or 2)

Type 1

Type 2

  • Halle Berry – actress
  • BB King – musician
  • Sugar Ray Leonard – boxer
  • Drew Carey – actor; comedian; game show host
  • Tommy Lee – drummer for Motley Crue
  • Billie Jean King – tennis player

Salma Hayek (gestational diabetes)

DIABETES AWARENESS MONTH 16 PART SPECIAL SERIES

In ALL ARTICLES on November 5, 2009 at 11:24 pm

DIABETES AWARENESS MONTH 16 PART SPECIAL SERIES ON:

“THE DIABETES PANDEMIC – An inconvenient Truth”

by Don Margolis, Founder, Repair Stem Cell Institute

[ CLICK HERE TO READ ]

* Part 1 of 16: THE GROWING PANDEMIC
Errata?

* Part 2 of 16: REFINED WHEAT DEFINED
Refined Wheat

* Part 3 of 16: HOW SWEET IT IS (NOT)
Refined Sugar, The Sweetest Poison of All

* Part 4 of 16: MODERN FOOD = MODERN ALCHEMY
Why McDonald’s Fries Taste So Good

* Part 5 of 16: DO YOU (REALLY) WANT FRIES WITH THAT?
California Wants to Serve a Warning With Fries

* Part 6 of 16: SUGAR CAUSES DENTAL DECAY & DISEASE
Sugar and Science

* Part 7 of 16: MEXICAN OBESITY
Mexico Pushes National Campaign to Lose Weight

* Part 8 of 16: MEXICAN DIABETES
Mexico warns diabetes may bankrupt health system

* Part 9 of 16: THE CIGARETTE CONNECTION
From the list of 599 approved cigarette additives

* Part 10 of 16: ADA REQUESTS MORE FUNDING TO FIGHT DIABETES
American Diabetes Association Urges Congress to Increase CDC Diabetes Prevention Funding By $20.8 Million: One Dollar for Every American With Diabetes

* Part 11 of 16: THE PANDEMIC…TOMORROW
Effect of current factor 1.035 annual increase in WHO diabetes prevalence

* Part 12 of 16: LEARNING FROM DIABETIC MICE
Mouse study points researchers toward early trigger for type-1 diabetes

* Part 13 of 16: THE COST OF THE PANDEMIC
Effect of 1.04 annual increase of USA diabetes prevalence coupled with 6% annual medical inflation rate for care and medical costs per diabetic combined

* Part 14 of 16: SPANISH DIABETES REFORM
Why Spain leads the world in fighting obesity and diabetes

* Part 15 of 16: YOUR PLASTIC IS KILLING YOU
Higher urinary levels of chemical used in plastic food and beverage containers associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes

* Part 16 of 16: INSULIN AND DIABETES
War On Diabetes

[ CLICK HERE TO READ ]

Insulin-Producing Cells From Adult Skin Cells

In ALL ARTICLES on September 1, 2009 at 3:04 pm

MONDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) — Using skin cells from people with type 1 diabetes, researchers were able to produce cells that made insulin in response to changing blood sugar levels, though not as efficiently as normal insulin-producing cells do.

The major immediate implication from this experiment is that scientists now have a preliminary lab model of human type 1 diabetes cells, and the hope is that an animal model of the disease could be developed from this research. Down the road, this finding could lead to a way to replace the islet cells that were destroyed when the disease first developed.

via Atlanta health, diet and fitness news | ajc.com.

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