DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘soldier’

Innovation in the Treatment of PTSD

In HEALTH AND WELLNESS, HOPE AND INSPIRATION, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on February 9, 2017 at 3:16 pm

perspective

Time to change our perspective on PTSD treatments

Quite often, advances in treatment modalities are not from new drugs or new techniques but rather, from:

  • redefining our definitions of disease
  • redefining existing treatment methods
  • redefining our definition of recovery

Here’s one such example where the common convention of “in-person therapy sessions” for PTSD is modified by the simple removal of the “in-person” and replacing it…with teleconferencing.  Such a small change to you and me but it makes a significant difference to the patient and…isn’t that the true end goal?

For veterans who may have difficulty attending in-person therapy sessions to treat post traumatic stress disorder, a recent study has shown that treatment through video conferences, or “telemedicine,” can be just as effective.

Many individuals in need of PTSD services live in remote areas around the world where mental health care tends to be scarce. Traveling great distances in order to access this specific type of care is not always ideal, especially for those who already suffer from mental health problems, and it can also be a financial burden. Providing telemental health technology to individuals who would otherwise not be able to experience PTSD treatment is easing these burdens.

Offering both clinical and educational services, telemedicine utilizes communications technology in support and healthcare when distance becomes an issue. These services can include clinical assessment, psychotherapy (for individuals or groups), cognitive tests, and even general psychiatry.

Compared to prolonged exposure therapy conducted in the homes of patients, telemedicine yielded extremely similar results in terms of effectiveness. While some may argue that in-person treatment allows for a more personal, realistic style of therapy, statistics have shown that those who received the same treatment via video screens had similar levels of improvement.

Despite these results, therapy provided through the internet is among the most disputed forms of telemental health services available, due to the previously mentioned fact; it is less personal. Doctors and therapists have feared that their lack of physical presence allows for the patients to react negatively without control, though studies have proved otherwise.

An extremely important consideration in working with those who suffer from PTSD is establishing a sense of safety and comfort, which may prove difficult without actually being in the room. Tools and techniques that therapists have used in order to combat this obstacle include pre-treatment orientation sessions, utilizing fax machines or email to share documents and paperwork, and questionnaires allowing room for criticism or feedback.

Regardless of the criticism, the results of this study prove that there are very little differences in the outcomes of both in-person treatment and telemental treatment. This could change how mental health services are provided on several different platforms, as well as offer new ideas in the treatment of such problems.

For more, visit BennWillcox.co!

Source: Innovation in the Treatment of PTSD

Advertisements

NEW HOPE FOR SOLDIERS DISFIGURED IN WAR

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 8, 2014 at 11:08 am
face-of-hope

Stem cells as part of every treatment protocol
What if stem cells could be used in conjunction with other treatments and in doing so, make the impossible, possible?  Well…they are starting to.  “Army surgeon Robert Hale is leading the charge to make facial reconstruction medicine ready for the wounds of 21st-century war.”

A great deal of scientific and anecdotal evidence substantiate that stem cells are a seemingly limitless potential cure-all and one of the greatest medical advancements known to man.  While the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy when utilized as an isolated therapy is virtually undeniable, the full extent of stem cells’ healing potential is even more awe-inspiring.  Stem cells can potentially become complements to thousands of other treatments due to:

  • their regenerative capabilities
  • their flexibility
  • the fact that they are part of the body’s natural healing system

Stem cells have been used successfully to reduce symptoms and alleviate the suffering of hundreds of conditions previously believed to be incurable and they are often best utilized in isolation.  In fact, many stem cell doctors believe they work best when manipulated or modified as little as possible.  On the other hand, they have shown great success when used with other treatment protocols.  The oldest example is the 6 decades of stem cell use in the form of Bone Marrow Transplants and in coordination with chemo to mitigate Leukemia, Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas and other blood cancers.  When used with an “other” effective treatment, the result is often greater than the sum of the parts as the stem cells contribute to the healing potential of the “other” protocol.

In the article below, Army surgeon Robert Hale combines multiple techniques and protocols with stem cell therapy with a patient whose injuries were so severe, they were arranging organ donation.  This “protocol stacking” of cutting edge facial reconstruction, cutting edge stem cell therapy, superclavicle flap grafting from 1917 and other techniques allowed him to accomplish what was previously impossible.  .

Used alone, stem cells have a proven history of success as the “this changes everything” element in regenerative medicine and modern healing.

Used in conjunction with other established protocols or with new technologies, stem cells may very well change everything we have come to expect from modern medicine.

By the way, we saw this coming 3 years ago in DAMN! SILENCE OF THE LAMBS MEETS STEM CELLS!

SILENCE OF THE LAMBS MEETS STEM CELLS and future transplant recipients win big!!  Remember in Silence of the Lambs, at the end of the movie, when Hannibal Lechter cuts off the guards face and then wears it out to escape?  It turns out, if he had some stem cells to go with that face transplant, he could have just kept on wearing it.  Surgical researchers did exactly that on four dogs and all 4 of the dogs tolerated the face transplants for over one year without immunosuppressive drugs after the first month.

New Hope for Soldiers Disfigured in War

Army surgeon Robert Hale is leading the charge to make facial reconstruction medicine ready for the wounds of 21st-century war.

Col. Robert Hale shows a prototype of a mask that would speed healing and help prevent infection in treatment of facial injuries in soldiers. The design and function of the biomask has evolved as Hale has worked with research teams at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio…

http://discovermagazine.com/2014/sept/11-face-of-hope

Organ Regeneration from Stem Cells

In ALL ARTICLES on September 14, 2011 at 5:09 pm

The Big Idea:

Organ Regeneration

Photo: Growing an ear

Miracle Grow

In the future people who need a body part may get their own back—regrown in the lab from their own cells.

By Josie Glausiusz
Photograph by Rebecca Hale, NGM Staff

Above: The synthetic scaffold of an ear sits bathed in cartilage-producing cells, part of an effort to grow new ears for wounded soldiers.

More than 100,000 people are waiting for organ transplants in the U.S. alone; every day 18 of them die. Not only are healthy organs in short supply, but donor and patient also have to be closely matched, or the patient’s immune system may reject the transplant. A new kind of solution is incubating in medical labs: “bioartificial” organs grown from the patient’s own cells. Thirty people have received lab-grown bladders already, and other engineered organs are in the pipeline.

The bladder technique was developed by Anthony Atala of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Researchers take healthy cells from a patient’s diseased bladder, cause them to multiply profusely in petri dishes, then apply them to a balloon-shaped scaffold made partly of collagen, the protein found in cartilage. Muscle cells go on the outside, urothelial cells (which line the urinary tract) on the inside. “It’s like baking a layer cake,” says Atala. “You’re layering the cells one layer at a time, spreading these toppings.” The bladder-to-be is then incubated at body temperature until the cells form functioning tissue. The whole process takes six to eight weeks.

Solid organs with lots of blood vessels, such as kidneys or livers, are harder to grow than hollow ones like bladders. But Atala’s group—which is working on 22 organs and tissues, including ears—recently made a functioning piece of human liver. One tool they use is similar to an ink-jet printer; it “prints” different types of cells and the organ scaffold one layer at a time.

Other labs are also racing to make bioartificial organs. A jawbone has sprouted at Columbia University and a lung at Yale. At the University of Minnesota, Doris Taylor has fabricated a beating rat heart, growing cells from one rat on a scaffold she made from the heart of another by washing off its own cells. And at the University of Michigan, H. David Humes has created an artificial kidney from cells seeded onto a synthetic scaffold. The cell-phone-size kidney has passed tests on sheep—it’s not yet implantable, but it’s wearable, unlike a dialysis machine, and it does more than filter toxins from blood. It also makes hormones and performs other kidney functions.

Growing a copy of a patient’s organ may not always be possible—for instance, when the original is too damaged by cancer. One solution for such patients might be a stem cell bank. Atala’s team has shown that stem cells can be collected without harming human embryos (and thus without political controversy) from amniotic fluid in the womb. The researchers have coaxed those cells into becoming heart, liver, and other organ cells. A bank of 100,000 stem cell samples, Atala says, would have enough genetic variety to match nearly any patient. Surgeons would order organs grown as needed instead of waiting for cadavers that might not be a perfect match. “There are few things as devastating for a surgeon as knowing you have to replace the tissue and you’re doing something that’s not ideal,” says Atala, a urologic surgeon himself. “Wouldn’t it be great if they had their own organ?” Great for the patient especially, he means.

%d bloggers like this: