DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘peptide’

DIABETES and STEM CELL TREATMENTS AVAILABLE

In ALL ARTICLES on October 24, 2011 at 9:15 am

Anyone interested in treatment info with one of the best stem cell diabetes doctors in the world can contact me or fill out this form: 
TREATMENT INFORMATION REQUEST – PATIENT QUESTIONNAIRE

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Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 1?

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 31, 2009 at 12:00 pm

Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 1? See the results of this one year study of adult stem cell treatment of Diabetes type – 1. C-peptide levels, insulin levels, insulin dosage requirements and HA1c levels.

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Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 2?

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 31, 2009 at 12:12 pm

Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 2? See the results of this one year study of adult stem cell treatment of Diabetes type – 2.  C-peptide levels, insulin levels, insulin dosage requirements and HA1c levels.

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DIABETES CLINICAL TRIALS

  • FIRST USE OF CORD BLOOD TO ALTER COURSE OF TYPE 1 DIABETES, June 25, 2007 – (I’ll bet nobody heard of this one!)transfusion of stored, autologous (i.e. the person’s own), umbilical cord blood into a group of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes appears to have reduced their disease severity, possibly re-setting the immune system and slowing the destruction of their insulin-producing cells, according to a report presented today at the American Diabetes Association’s 67th Annual Scientific Sessions. –http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/media/m_pdf/ADA_T1D_PR-06-25-07.pdf(The ADA in 2007 knew stem cells can treat Diabetes type 1 in children!)
  • Diabetes type 1 stem cell clinical trial – Enrollment 11/2003-4/2008, follow-up until December 2008 – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/14/type-1-diabetes-stem-cells-clinical-trial/

Images from above are from these articles:

  • Why no diabetes clinical trial s in the US when mice were cured of diabetes type 1 in the 1990’s? –  Weissman, a professor of pathology and developmental biology at Stanford University, states: “Stem cells are rare, self-renewing, and can regenerate body tissues.” He repeatedly expressed frustration that while many of his discoveries seemed to hold remarkable potential for life-saving treatments, commercial or regulatory hurdles have prevented his scientific research from benefiting human beings. One example is, his mid-’90s research on type I diabetes, in which he demonstrated the ability to fully cure type I diabetes in mice using stem cells. Even though the experiments avoided political controversy by using adult/repair stem cells, which do not come from embryos, Weissman ran into a road block when pharmaceutical companies refused to sponsor clinical trials. The therapy went nowhere. “The pharmaceutical companies had put profit over principle, preferring to keep diabetes sufferers dependent on costly insulin than to cure them once and for all.” – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/13/research-from-90s-cures-type-1-diabetes/

If you or a loved one is interested in receiving FREE information on currently available stem cell treatments for DIABETES, please contact me at dsgrano@gmail.com or for other options, go to: CONTACT ME

TYPE 1 DIABETES – STEM CELLS CLINICAL TRIAL

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on September 14, 2009 at 12:37 am

C-Peptide Levels and Insulin Independence Following Autologous Nonmyeloablative Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Carlos E. B. Couri, MD, PhD; Maria C. B. Oliveira, MD; Ana B. P. L. Stracieri, MD, PhD; Daniela A. Moraes, MD; Fabiano Pieroni, MD, PhD; George M. N. Barros, MD; Maria Isabel A. Madeira, MD; Kelen C. R. Malmegrim, PhD; Maria C. Foss-Freitas, MD, PhD; Belinda P. Simões, MD, PhD; Edson Z. Martinez, PhD; Milton C. Foss, MD, PhD; Richard K. Burt, MD; Júlio C. Voltarelli, MD, PhD

JAMA. 2009;301(15):1573-1579.

Context In 2007, the effects of the autologous nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 15 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) were reported. Most patients became insulin free with normal levels of glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) during a mean 18.8-month follow-up. To investigate if this effect was due to preservation of beta-cell mass, continued monitoring was performed of C-peptide levels after stem cell transplantation in the 15 original and 8 additional patients.

Objective To determine C-peptide levels after autologous nonmyeloablative HSCT in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 DM during a longer follow-up.

Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective phase 1/2 study of 23 patients with type 1 DM (aged 13-31 years) diagnosed in the previous 6 weeks by clinical findings with hyperglycemia and confirmed by measurement of serum levels of anti–glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Enrollment was November 2003-April 2008, with follow-up until December 2008 at the Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit of the School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Hematopoietic stem cells were mobilized via the 2007 protocol.

Main Outcome Measures C-peptide levels measured during the mixed-meal tolerance test, before, and at different times following HSCT. Secondary end points included morbidity and mortality from transplantation, temporal changes in exogenous insulin requirements, and serum levels of HbA1c.

Results During a 7- to 58-month follow-up (mean, 29.8 months; median, 30 months), 20 patients without previous ketoacidosis and not receiving corticosteroids during the preparative regimen became insulin free. Twelve patients maintained this status for a mean 31 months (range, 14-52 months) and 8 patients relapsed and resumed insulin use at low dose (0.1-0.3 IU/kg). In the continuous insulin–independent group, HbA1c levels were less than 7.0% and mean (SE) area under the curve (AUC) of C-peptide levels increased significantly from 225.0 (75.2) ng/mL per 2 hours pretransplantation to 785.4 (90.3) ng/mL per 2 hours at 24 months posttransplantation (P < .001) and to 728.1 (144.4) ng/mL per 2 hours at 36 months (P = .001). In the transient insulin–independent group, mean (SE) AUC of C-peptide levels also increased from 148.9 (75.2) ng/mL per 2 hours pretransplantation to 546.8 (96.9) ng/mL per 2 hours at 36 months (P = .001), which was sustained at 48 months. In this group, 2 patients regained insulin independence after treatment with sitagliptin, which was associated with increase in C-peptide levels. Two patients developed bilateral nosocomial pneumonia, 3 patients developed late endocrine dysfunction, and 9 patients developed oligospermia. There was no mortality.

Conclusion After a mean follow-up of 29.8 months following autologous nonmyeloablative HSCT in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 DM, C-peptide levels increased significantly and the majority of patients achieved insulin independence with good glycemic control.

Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00315133
Author Affiliations: Departments of Clinical Medicine (Drs Couri, Oliveira, Stracieri, Moraes, Pieroni, Barros, Madeira, Malmegrim, Foss-Freitas, Simões, Foss, and Voltarelli) and Social Medicine (Dr Martinez), School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; and Division of Immunotherapy, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (Dr Burt).

Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 1?

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 31, 2009 at 12:00 pm

Can stem cells cure Diabetes – type 1? See the results of this one year study of adult stem cell treatment of Diabetes type – 1. C-peptide levels, insulin levels, insulin dosage requirements and HA1c levels.

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Stem Cells: Molecules Self-assemble To Provide New Therapeutic Treatments

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 10:42 am
Molecules Self-assemble To Provide New Therapeutic Treatments

ScienceDaily (Feb. 14, 2009) — Researchers in the laboratory of Samuel I. Stupp at Northwestern University have an interesting approach for tackling some major health problems: gather raw materials and then let them self-assemble into structures that can address a multitude of medical needs.

At the core of the research are peptide amphiphiles (PA), small synthetic molecules that Stupp first developed seven years ago, which have been essential in his work on regenerative medicine. By tailoring these molecules and combining them with others, the researchers can make a wide variety of structures that may provide new treatments for medical issues including spinal cord injuries, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.

Ramille M. Capito, a research assistant professor in Stupp’s lab, shared an overview of this work in a presentation titled “Exploration of Novel Materials and Nanotubes in Stem Cell Therapy,” as part of the “Adult Stem Cells: From Scientific Process to Patient Benefit” symposium on Feb. 14, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Chicago.

As a postdoctoral fellow in Stupp’s group, Capito recently discovered that combining the PA molecules with hyaluronic acid (HA), a biopolymer readily found in the human body in places like joints and cartilage, resulted in an instant membrane structure in the form of self-assembling sacs. The sac membrane was found to have hierarchical order from the nanoscale to microscale giving it unique physical properties. These findings were first published last year in the journal Science (Capito et al, Science 2008; 319:1812-6).

In creating a sac, Capito took advantage of the fact that HA molecules are larger and heavier than the smaller PA molecules. In a deep vial, she pipetted the PA solution and onto that injected the HA solution. As the heavier molecules sank, the lighter molecules engulfed them, creating a closed sac with the HA solution trapped inside the membrane.

Having formed the sacs, Capito next studied human stem cells engulfed by the self-assembly process inside sacs that she placed in culture. She found that the cells remained viable for up to four weeks, that a large protein — a growth factor important in the signaling of stem cells — could cross the membrane, and that the stem cells were able to differentiate.

In a clever demonstration of self-repair, if the sac’s membrane had a hole (from a needle injection, for example), Capito simply placed a drop of the PA solution on the tear, which interacted with the HA inside, resulting in self-assembly and a sealed hole.

While the underlying, highly ordered structures of the sacs and membranes have dimensions on the nanoscale, the sacs and membranes themselves can be of any dimension and are visible to the naked eye.

These sacs can be tailored to include bioactive regions, allowing researchers to incorporate a variety of designs into one sac structure. This capability opens the door to the creation of new methods for stem cell delivery. Stem cells can be loaded in the sac, which can be tailored to release the cells at the point of injury.

Previous work has shown that the PA molecules can be dissolved to form fibril structures with diameters of 5 to 8 nanometers. These gel structures can be used for regenerative medicine, and the research group has in vivo data for spinal cord repair, angiogenesis and bone and cartilage regeneration.

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