DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘oxygen’

CEREBRAL PALSY AND STEM CELLS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 10, 2012 at 10:24 am

https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/little-lucass-stem-cell-hope/
https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/08/28/cord-blood-wakes-up-drowning-victim%e2%80%99s-brain/

https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/shiu-sisters-cp-and-rop-adult-stem-cell-patients/

Duke U. CLINICAL TRIAL for Cerebral Palsy & other newborn brain injuries – http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00593242?term=hypoxic+ischemic+encephalopathy&rank=3 – for more information – http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/usa/medical/autocbt.shtml or for anecdotal info – Abby , Chloe, Dallas

Dallas Hextell, a 2-year-old from Sacramento, California, received an infusion of his own umbilical cord blood as part of the Duke University clinical trial. Within five days, he showed improvements in the limitations imposed by the condition.  video: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/23569985#23569985
via http://www.youhavealawyer.com/blog/2008/03/26/cerebral-palsy-improvement/

“a toddler with cerebral palsy, who experienced dramatic improvements in his disability following an experimental procedure involving a stem cell transplant.” – http://pediatrics.duke.edu/modules/dept_peds_annc/index.php?id=79\

Cerebral Palsy: Cord Blood Stem Cell Research and Treatment in Clinical Trials – Update

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

For those of  you who follow our blogs, you know well that this is a topic of interest for us.  It bears repeating – our job as lawyers is to properly investigate potential claims of malpractice in areas such as cerebral palsy and seek redress for our clients when the evidence demonstrates a connection between birth injuries and medical care, but the much more important topic for our clients and victims of cerebral palsy is in the field of medical research. It is through research efforts – including clinical trials – that this dreaded condition will be ameliorated and hopefully eradicated. Trust me, after practicing law for over 35 years, I’m not worried about job security – the frailties of the human condition will more than suffice to fill our file cabinets with people to help due to the negligence of others.

We have reported previously on various topics involving cord blood and stem cell research as they relate to a number of conditions, including cerebral palsy.  It seems that months have passed since there has been any significant news about two programs underway: one at the Medical College of Georgia and the other at Duke.  Earlier this month, an update came across the social media network via a post by Singularity Hub – Cord Blood Stem Cell Treatment for Cerebral Palsy in Clinical Trial | Singularity Hub.

Here’s our encapsulated version regarding the studies and Singularity Hub’s report.

Photo provided by MSNBC

Duke University

According to the website ClincalTrials.gov, Duke began a clinical therapeutic trial – identifier: NCT00593242 – in January 2008 (estimated completion date of January 2011) whose primary purpose is listed as treatment of newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) – inadequate oxygenation in the perinatal period for purposes of this study – through the controlled “collection, preparation and infusion of a baby’s own (autologous) umbilical cord blood in the first 14 days after birth if the baby is born with signs of brain injury.” For information concerning the inclusion and exclusion criteria for participation in this clinical trial, see the online posting. Essentially, the babies are then to be “followed for neurodevelopmental outcome at 4 – 6 and 9 – 12 months at Duke’s Special Infant Care Clinic. MRI’s will be obtained between postnatal weeks 1 and 4, and, for study purposes at 4 – 6 postnatal months.”

While other aspects of processing and administration are no doubt part of the key components of this project, it is readily apparent that the end-point goal is discovery of an effective treatment of cerebral palsy for the identified neonates in the study and then development of a second stage clinical trial to take such treatment modality to a greater number of potential beneficiaries.

Medical College of Georgia

For detailed information on this study, which began in February of this year, similar information is available through ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01072370.  This clinical trial investigation has a patient population consisting of children from ages of 2 to 12, “whose parents have saved their infant’s cord blood, who have non-progressive motor disability, and whose parents intend to have a cord blood infusion.”  Again – for full details regarding inclusion and exclusion criteria, see the full online posting.

For those parents who may be interested in determining if their child would qualify to participate, the study is still recruiting participants.  The contact information is also available at this link: Contact: James E Carroll, M.D.     706-721-3371     jcarroll@mcg.edu

Today’s report from Singularity Hub provides some encouraging – albeit anecdotal – news of potential progress.

The anecdotal evidence in support of treating cerebral palsy with cord blood stem cells is astounding. Much of it has actually been been performed at Duke University by one of the investigators in the pilot study: Joanne Kurtzberg. Among those that have been successfully treated at Duke include Ryan Schneider, Maia Friedlander, Chloe Levine, and Dallas Hextell. All had CP or CP-like symptoms and all made remarkable recoveries after cord blood stem cell treatments. Dallas Hextell, who showed improvements just 5 days after his therapy was featured on the Today show (the original report contains video compliments of MSNBC).

In addition to the early good news coming out of these projects, one other lesson is learned – for the time being, the storage of cord blood is an important component for those hoping to participate in such studies – particularly that being conducted at the Medical College of Georgia.  We have earlier reported on this topic as well.  You may want to refer to our early posting for some basic information if you are interested.

Obviously, the implications – if these projects prove to be successful – are far-reaching. The enthusiasm of the participants in these research projects is not limited to them alone. The words of the author, Aaron Saenz, from Singularity Hub somewhat tells it all:

So we have some exciting news for cerebral palsy, and some exciting news for those thinking about cord blood. What about the rest of us? Well the MCG and Duke work has some far reaching implications. Neurological damage, whether it’s caused by oxygen deprivation or some other injury, is one of the most difficult things to heal in the body. Work in animals (like that done by Carroll on rats) show that stem cells can not only help damaged brain cells recover, but they can also replace cells that have died. We may find that stem cells therapies have a wide range of applications for many different forms of brain damage. Kurtzberg is researching many different ways cord blood could be used (autologous or through donors) to treat a variety of conditions. In other words, today stem cells conquer cerebral palsy…tomorrow, the world.

Let’s all hope that Mr. Saenz is a prophet.

 

https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/10/24/the-challenging-life-of-a-young-man-with-cp-neil-barron/

First Ever Multicellular Animals Found In Oxygen-Free Environment | Popular Science

In OFF THE BEATEN PATH on April 7, 2010 at 3:48 pm

First Ever Multicellular Animals Found In Oxygen-Free Environment

Unnamed Loriciferan:   via Nature

By Stuart Fox Posted 04.06.2010 at 5:30 pm

In the 236 years since oxygen was identified as a life-giving necessity, no scientist anywhere has discovered a multicellular animal capable of living without the stuff. Until now. Researchers from the Polytechnic University of Marche in Ancona, Italy, have discovered three new species that live their entire life in an anoxic pit beneath the Mediterranean Sea. This discovery drastically revises science’s understand of where animals can thrive.Prior to this discovery, the only organisms capable of life in oxygen-free environments were viruses and bacteria.

via First Ever Multicellular Animals Found In Oxygen-Free Environment | Popular Science.

Stem Cells + Hyperbaric Improve Diabetes type 2

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on September 1, 2009 at 3:15 pm

Stem Cell Infusion And Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment Improve Islet Function In Diabetes

ScienceDaily (Mar. 23, 2009) — A study to determine if patients with type 2 diabetes can benefit from a combination of autologous (patient self-donated) stem cell infusions (ASC) and hyperbaric (above the normal air pressure of ) oxygen treatment (HBO) before and after ASC has found “significant benefits” in terms of “improvements in glycemic control” along with “reduced insulin requirements.”

The combination therapy could decrease type 2 diabetes morbidity and mortality, said the authors, who published their study results in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (Vol. 17 No.12).

via Stem Cell Infusion And Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment Improve Islet Function In Diabetes.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gaining in popularity

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on March 7, 2009 at 12:51 pm

What does this have to do with stem cells?  Well…for that you are going to have to wait and see.  But rest assured, when you do learn, it will BLOW YOUR MIND!! -dg

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gaining in popularity

Sat, 28 Feb 2009 6:26p.m.

Doctors have discovered breathing in pure oxygen can give people with wounds that won’t heal a new lease of life.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was seen as a last resort for those suffering from injuries that did not respond to treatment, but at a privately run clinic its success has meant it is gaining in popularity.

After part of his leg was amputated four years ago, Malcolm Fleck was in agony and could hardly move. His stump was ulcerated and infected and as a last resort he tried hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

“I had 11 operations in four years and this is getting rid of it where antibiotics and so-called well, modern medicine can’t,” Mr Fleck says.

The technology has been used by divers suffering from the bends for decades, but now it is becoming an accepted part of mainstream medicine.

Patients sit inside the chamber breathing pure oxygen through helmets under pressure. It is this combination that accelerates healing by up to 80 percent.

With titanium implants inserted into her neck, Paparoa schoolteacher Audrey Campbell was in constant pain. She could not stand, let a long work.

Having tried numerous treatments in the past she was cynical at first, but now she’s a convert.

“I wouldn’t have believed it, it’s a really positive experience,” Ms Campbell says.

Both patients are now breathing easy as the pain subsides and their recovery takes off.

via 3 News > Science-Tech > Story > Hyperbaric oxygen therapy gaining in popularity.

Stem Cell Research – Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to stimulate stem cell formation

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 23, 2009 at 1:37 pm

Move over Michael Jackson!

23 Feb 2009 12:09 pm

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to stimulate stem cell formation

hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy HBOT involves breathing pure oxygen to higher than atmospheric pressures in an enclosed chamber This treatment is used to treat divers who suffer from bends or decompression sickness.

The experts of Edinburgh University will conduct a clinical trial to study whether HBOT can improve liver functions and stimulate bone marrow stem cells.

via Stem Cell Research Blog » Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy to stimulate stem cell formation.

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