DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘MUSCULAR’

Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal | Reuters

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 22, 2014 at 5:32 pm
  • cells were safe and well tolerated
  • one group receiving a 150 million cell dose displaying a 500 percent improvement over the placebo group.
  • Patients treated with a 300 million cell dose showed a 300 percent improvement over the placebo.
  • An analysis of the gluteal muscle indicated an increase in muscle volume in those patients treated…versus the placebo group.

Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal

TEL AVIV Tue Jan 21, 2014 3:07am EST

(Reuters) – Pluristem Therapeutics Inc said results from its early/mid-stage clinical trial indicated its placenta-derived stem cells for the treatment of muscle injury were safe and provided evidence the cells might be effective in treating orthopedic injuries.

\”Patients treated with PLX-PAD had a greater improved change of maximal voluntary muscle contraction force than the placebo group,\” Israel-based Pluristem said in a statement on Tuesday.

The trial was conducted at the Orthopedic Clinic of the Charite University Medical School under the auspices of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Germany\’s health authority.

\”This was a very important study not only for Pluristem but for the cell therapy industry in general,\” Pluristem chief executive Zami Aberman said. \”Based on these results, we intend to move forward with implementing our strategy towards using PLX cells in orthopedic indications and muscle trauma.\”

The injured muscle studied was the gluteus medius muscle in the buttock. Total hip replacement surgery via the standard transgluteal approach necessitates injury of the gluteus medius muscle, and post-operative healing is crucial for joint stability and function.

\”The study showed that PLX-PAD cells were safe and well tolerated,\” the statement said.

The primary efficacy endpoint of the study was the change in maximal voluntary isometric contraction force of the gluteal muscle six months after surgery.

Efficacy was shown in two groups treated with the cells, with one group receiving a 150 million cell dose displaying a 500 percent improvement over the placebo group. Patients treated with a 300 million cell dose showed a 300 percent improvement over the placebo.

An analysis of the gluteal muscle indicated an increase in muscle volume in those patients treated with PLX-PAD cells versus the placebo group.

via Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal | Reuters.

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Firefighters raise $3,500 for Brody Kilby-McGuire – The Daily Observer – Ontario, CA

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 17, 2009 at 12:51 am

Firefighters save lives with stem cells instead of fire hoses. – dg

Brody Kilby-McGuire, 4, tried using a golf club for a while, but then decided it was easier to kick the ball in the hole while he waited for Saturday’s golf tournament to raise money for his medical expenses to get started. His mom Erin Kilby got to hold the club instead.

Firefighters raise $3,500 for Brody Kilby-McGuire

TINA PEPLINSKIE

A charity golf tournament on the weekend raised $3,500 for a little boy who recently underwent a stem cell transplant in the Dominican Republic to treat progressive muscle degeneration.

Brody Kilby-McGuire, 4, was the guest of honour and junior fire chief for the day Saturday at a golf tournament organized by the Laurentian Valley Fire Fighters Association and held at the Pembroke Golf Club…

….That $30,000 is needed to cover medical expenses since Brody was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in the spring. When Brody started experiencing difficulty climbing the stairs, even entering and exiting the front door of the family’s home near Chapeau, his parents Erin Kilby and Dan McGuire took him to the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario where he was diagnosed.

Duchenne MD is a severe recessive form of muscular dystrophy, which sees rapid progression of muscle degeneration because of the mutation of genes. It affects one in 3,500 males.

At the end of June, Brody underwent a three-hour stem cell procedure in the Dominican Republic. Since then he has shown signs of improvement and is even learning to run, a new skill he was demonstrating Saturday at the golf course as he opted to kick golf balls in the hole on the putting green instead of the traditional club method…

via Firefighters raise $3,500 for Brody Kilby-McGuire – The Daily Observer – Ontario, CA.

Stem Cell Breakthrough: Monitoring The On Switch That Turns Stem Cells Into Muscle

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 31, 2009 at 12:52 am

muscle-stem-cells

ScienceDaily (Mar. 30, 2009) — In a genetic engineering breakthrough that could help everyone from bed-ridden patients to elite athletes, a team of American researchers—including 2007 Nobel Prize winner Mario R. Capecchi—have created a “switch” that allows mutations or light signals to be turned on in muscle stem cells to monitor muscle regeneration in a living mammal.

For humans, this work could lead to a genetic switch, or drug, that allows people to grow new muscle cells to replace those that are damaged, worn out, or not working for other reasons (e.g., muscular dystrophy). In addition, this same discovery also gives researchers a new tool for the study of difficult-to-treat muscle cancers.

via Stem Cell Breakthrough: Monitoring The On Switch That Turns Stem Cells Into Muscle.

See also:

Health & Medicine

* Stem Cells

* Prostate Cancer

* Skin Cancer

* Brain Tumor

* Fibromyalgia

* Muscular Dystrophy

Reference

* Stem cell treatments

* Embryonic stem cell

* Biological tissue

* Motor neuron

Journal of Translational Medicine | Full text | Stem cells from umbilical cord blood do have myogenic potential, with and without differentiation induction in vitro

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 11:12 am

Stem cells from umbilical cord blood do have myogenic potential, with and without differentiation induction in vitro

Journal of Translational Medicine 2009, 7:6doi:10.1186/1479-5876-7-6

Conclusion

Our findings showed that umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells have the potential to interact with dystrophic muscle cells restoring the dystrophin expression of DMD cells in vitro. Although utilized within the context of DMD, the results presented here may be valid to other muscle-related cell therapy applications.

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/7/1/6

via Journal of Translational Medicine | Full text | Stem cells from umbilical cord blood do have myogenic potential, with and without differentiation induction in vitro.

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, PART TWO – THE TREATMENT

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS - 101 on February 10, 2009 at 10:02 pm

sunset_may_2006The World-Leader in RSC treatments for neurological and autoimmune diseases is a treatment center which no center in the world can match for:

  1. Number of Diseases treated, and
  2. Number of Patients treated

The primary source of STEM CELLS used in treatments are autologous stem cells from the patient’s own body. Second is fresh cord blood stem cells that are made to order.  These cord blood stem cells are never frozen as they believe that even a cryo freeze can lower the viability and quality of the Repair Stem Cells.

Here is the list of stem cell treatments offered:

  • Alzheimer’s
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Ataxia
  • Cerebellar Ataxia ( Includes Type 6 )
  • Hereditary Ataxias
  • Spinocerebellar Atrophy and Spinocerebellar Degeneration
  • Acquired Ataxia
  • Machado-Joseph disease
  • Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy
  • Early Stage Ataxia Telangiectasia
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Rett Syndrome
  • Absence of the Septum Pellucidum
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis
  • Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum
  • Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia
  • Aicardi Syndrome
  • Bell’s Palsy
  • Brachial Plexus Injury
  • Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries
  • Brown-Sequard syndrome
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Central Cord Syndrome
  • Central Pain Syndrome
  • Central Pontine Myelinolysis
  • Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Cerebral Atrophy
  • Cerebral Hypoxia
  • Chiari Malformation
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
  • Encephalopathy
  • Epilepsy
  • Early Infantile Epileptic
  • Encephalopathy
    (Ohtahara Syndrome)
  • Glycogen Storage Disease
    (Pompe Disease)
  • Glucose Transfer Disorders
  • Guillain-Barr? Syndrome
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hypertonia
  • Hypotonia
  • Infantile Spasm
  • Kennedy’s Disease (Bulbospinal Muscular Atrophy, X-Linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy)
  • Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
  • Lissencephaly
  • Meningitis and Encephalitis
  • Motor Neurone Disease
  • Primary Lateral Sclerosis
  • Microcephaly
  • Multisystem Atrophy
    Including Type C
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Myoclonus
  • Myoclonic Encephalopathy of Infants
  • Myopathies
  • Congenital Myopathy
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Neurotoxicity
  • Optic Nerve Disorders
  • Septo-Optic Dysplasia
  • Optic Nerve Hypoplasia
  • Optic Atrophy
  • Damage to the Optic Nerve
  • Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Perisylvian
  • Polymicrogyria
  • Post-polio Syndrome
  • Schizencephaly
  • Spastic Tetraparesis
  • Spina Bifida
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy
  • Stroke
  • Transverse Myelitis
  • West Nile Virus
  • West Syndrome

Whether or not you see your diagnosis listed, always write directly to this address for further information about any neurological disease:

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MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, PART ONE – THE DISEASE

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS - 101 on February 10, 2009 at 9:49 pm

sunset_may_2006_pana1

This is a 2 part post on Muscular Dystrophy in response to the many people have recently been asking about treatments.  Part 1 defines Muscular Dystrophy (by the Doctors who treat it).  Part 2 supplys information on treatment techniques and parameters.

Muscular Dystrophy Synonyms:

* Childhood Muscular Dystrophy
* DMD
* Muscular Dystrophy, Classic X-linked Recessive
* Progressive Muscular Dystrophy of Childhood
* Pseudohypertrophic Muscular Dystrophy

General Discussion:

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a hereditary degenerative disease of skeletal (voluntary) muscles, is considered the most prevalent form of childhood muscular dystrophy. The disorder typically is recognized from approximately age three to six years and has a relatively rapid, progressive disease course. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is initially characterized by muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) within the pelvic area that may be followed by involvement of the shoulder muscles. With disease progression, muscle weakness and atrophy affect the trunk and forearms and gradually progress to involve most major muscles of the body.

In individuals with the disorder, initial findings may include an unusual, waddling manner of walking (gait); difficulty climbing stairs or rising from a sitting position; and repeated falling. With disease progression, additional abnormalities may develop, such as progressive curvature of the spine; wasting of thigh muscles and abnormal enlargement of the calves due to degenerative changes of muscle fibers (pseudohypertrophy); and abnormal fixation of certain joints (joint contractures) due to muscle weakness, prolonged immobility, and shortening of muscle fibers. By approximately age 10 to 12, most affected individuals require the use of a wheelchair.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is also typically characterized by additional abnormalities, including involvement of heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and varying degrees of intellectual impairment. Affected individuals may develop an increased susceptibility to respiratory infections (e.g., pneumonia), respiratory failure, impaired ability of the heart to pump blood effectively (heart failure), or other serious findings, leading to potentially life-threatening complications by late adolescence or early adulthood.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is caused by changes (mutations) of a gene on the short arm (p) of chromosome X (Xp21.2). The gene regulates the production of a protein that is found in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Known as dystrophin, the protein is thought to play an important role in maintaining the structure of these muscle cells.

In most affected individuals, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Therefore, the disorder is usually fully expressed in males only. However, in rare instances, females who carry a copy of the mutated gene (heterozygous carriers) may develop certain, typically milder symptoms associated with the disorder. In addition, for some individuals with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, there is no family history of the disease. In such cases, the disorder may be caused by new (sporadic) genetic mutations that occur for unknown reasons.

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