DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘muscle’

Stem cells in breast milk could fulfil baby’s ‘genetic destiny’

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 23, 2009 at 3:01 am

Stem cells in breast milk are adult or repair stem cells.  Is it any wonder repair stem cells are so good for you? – dg

https://i1.wp.com/www.impactlab.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/breastfeeding-243.jpgStem cells in breast milk could fulfil baby’s ‘genetic destiny’

by ANI on November 22, 2009

London, Nov 22 (ANI): A new research has found three different types of stem cells in breast milk which may be the reason why mother’s milk is deemed best for babies.

Dr Mark Cregan, medical director at the Swiss healthcare and baby equipment company Medela, has discovered adult stem cells of epithelial (mammary) and immune origin and found “very preliminary evidence” that stem cells in breast milk boost the growth of muscle and bone tissue.

According to him, mother’s milk could enable a child to “fulfil its genetic destiny”.

“Breast milk is the only adult tissue where more than one type of stem cell has been discovered. That is very unique and implies a lot about the impressive bioactivity of breast milk and the consequential benefits to the breastfed infant,” the Independent quoted Dr Cregan, as saying.

via Stem cells in breast milk could fulfil baby’s ‘genetic destiny’ adult stem cells, consequential benefits, different types of stem cells, types of stem cells.

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Duke U. Mends Broken Hearts

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on October 11, 2009 at 5:40 pm

FYI:

Duke University research is predated by the cardiac research by Prof Doris Taylor.  In 2005, Dr Taylor rinses rat hearts with detergent until the cells washed away and all that remained was a skeleton of tissue translucent as wax paper. She then injected the scaffold with fresh heart (stem) cells from newborn rats.  Four days later, “We could see these little areas that were beginning to beat.  By eight days, we could see the whole heart beating.”  The experiment, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, marked the first time scientists had created a functioning heart in the lab from biological tissue.

Duke U. Mends Broken Hearts

By mimicking the way embryonic stem cells develop into heart muscle in a lab, Duke University bioengineers believe they have taken an important first step toward growing a living “heart patch” to repair heart tissue damaged by disease.

https://i1.wp.com/www.pathology.unc.edu/faculty_labs/mack_lab/heart.jpg

In a series of experiments using mouse embryonic stem cells, the bioengineers used a novel mold of their own design to fashion a three-dimensional “patch” made up of heart muscle cells, known as cardiomyocytes. The new tissue exhibited the two most important attributes of heart muscle cells -– the ability to contract and to conduct electrical impulses. The mold looks much like a piece of Chex cereal in which researchers varied the shape and length of the pores to control the direction and orientation of the growing cells.

https://i1.wp.com/static-resources.goodguide.com/images/entities/all/221221.jpg

CHex Cereal

The researchers grew the cells in an environment much like that found in natural tissues. They encapsulated the cells within a gel composed of the blood-clotting protein fibrin, which provided mechanical support to the cells, allowing them to form a three-dimensional structure. They also found that the cardiomyocytes flourished only in the presence of a class of “helper” cells known as cardiac fibroblasts, which comprise as much as 60 percent of all cells present in a human heart.

https://i1.wp.com/www.immediart.com/catalog/images/big_images/SPL_6_P780110-Fibroblast_cells_showing_cytoskeleton.jpg

Fibroblast Cells

via New strategy for mending broken hearts? | Machines Like Us.

BEAUTY OF SCIENCE – Tissue Regeneration

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on October 8, 2009 at 5:33 pm

Evidence of the fusion of stem and muscle cells. In this experiment, human mesenchymal stem cells, which in this case produce a green fluorescent dye, are being cultivated together with muscle cells derived from mice. The picture shows the result of the fusion. In the fused cells, there is evidence of both the stem cell (in green dye), and typical muscle cell protein (red and partially orange because of the overlap of the two colours). The product of the fusion contains both, cell nuclei from the mouse (in blue) and from the human cell (indicated by the arrow). These nuclei can be distinguished by size, and the weak blue-colouring of the mouse nuclei. (Image: Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research)

via Tissue Regeneration Operates Differently Than Expected.

BEAUTY OF SCIENCE – Adult Stem Cells

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on October 8, 2009 at 5:31 pm

Middle of the upper image: the product of the fusion of a multipotent, adult stem cell, marked by the expression of a green fluorescent protein, with a muscle cell (dyed red). Next to it are unfused stem and heart muscle cells. Bottom image: a combination of phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy shows the expression of the green stem cell markers in the nucleus of a hybrid heart muscle cell. Next to it are a number of unfused cells. (Image: Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research)

via Adult Stem Cells May Be Just Remnants Of Evolution.

BEAUTY OF SCIENCE – Muscle stem cells

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on October 8, 2009 at 5:24 pm

“Fountain of youth” for muscle cells: muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells (marked in red) enable muscles to heal very well. They are located between the membrane of a muscle cell and the layer surrounding it. A molecular switch keeps the reservoir of satellite cells “fresh”, as researchers have now demonstrated. (Credit: Dr. Elena Vasyutina/Copyright: MDC)

Fountain Of Youth: Molecular Switch Holds Key To Reserve Supply Of Muscle Stem Cells.

OLD MUSCLE MADE YOUNG WITH SC

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on September 30, 2009 at 4:03 pm

“Our study shows that the ability of old human muscle to be maintained and repaired by muscle stem cells can be restored to youthful vigor”

Clues To Reversing Aging Of Human Muscle Discovered

ScienceDaily (Sep. 30, 2009) — A study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, has identified critical biochemical pathways linked to the aging of human muscle. By manipulating these pathways, the researchers were able to turn back the clock on old human muscle, restoring its ability to repair and rebuild itself.

The findings will be reported in the Sept. 30 issue of the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, a peer-reviewed, scientific publication of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

“Our study shows that the ability of old human muscle to be maintained and repaired by muscle stem cells can be restored to youthful vigor given the right mix of biochemical signals,” said Professor Irina Conboy, a faculty member in the graduate bioengineering program that is run jointly by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco, and head of the research team conducting the study. “This provides promising new targets for forestalling the debilitating muscle atrophy that accompanies aging, and perhaps other tissue degenerative disorders as well.”

via Clues To Reversing Aging Of Human Muscle Discovered.

Australian stem cell breakthrough…COMPLETE B.S.

In ALL ARTICLES on May 5, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Here we have a (COMPLETELY B.S.) Australian stem cell breakthrough…

mouse-science-muscle-stem-cells

mouse-science-muscle-stem-cells

The claim:

The article states that Australian scientists, on May 6, 2009, are the FIRST IN THE WORLD to regrow muscle tissue in mice using adult stem cells.

Stem cells regrow muscle
Wednesday, 06 May 2009,   By Fiona MacDonald
For the past 40 years scientists have been telling us that stem cells will revolutionise medicine, but we’ve yet to see that potential materialise. That may soon be about to change – after decades of groundwork Australian scientists at the University of New South Wales have become
the first in the world to regrow muscle tissue in mice using adult stem cells…

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/features/20090605-19090.html

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This claim is false.

Here is why…

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Argument #1:

This is TWENTY MONTHS behind the US stem cell scientists who regrew muscles cells in mice in Sept of 2007…and the US is behind most of the rest of the world!

Myoendothelial cells identified as new human source of stem cells with potential to repair muscle Published: Wednesday, 5-Sep-2007
…A thousand myoendothelial cells (adult stem cells) transplanted into the injured skeletal muscle of immunodeficient mice produced, on average, 89 muscle fibers, compared with 9 and 5 muscle fibers for endothelial and satellite cells, respectively. Myoendothelial cells also showed no propensity to form tumors, a concern with other stem cell therapies…
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=29538

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Argument #2:

1998 – Dr Doris Taylor takes stem cells from the thigh of a rabbit, injects them into scar tissue in the animal’s heart and repairs the damaged muscle.  The research was published in Nature Medicine.

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Argument #3:

1998-1999 – French researchers transplanted muscle cells into a human heart.

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Argument #4:

2000 – Human studies and trials using adult stem cells to regrow muscle tissue, including cardiac muscle tissue, are performed in many countries around the world.

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Argument #5:

2002 – Dr Taylor herself witnessed in Rotterdam the first patient in the world to get stem cells injected through a catheter into the wall of the heart. Encouraging results began to come in—improved ejection fractions, reduced diameters, thicker muscle tissue.

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Argument #6:

2004 – The first-ever commercial stem cell treatment center in the world was regrowing human cardiac muscle tissue in hundreds of patients in Thailand!

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Argument #7:

2005 – Dr Taylor  rinsed rat hearts with detergent until the cells washed away and all that remained was a skeleton of tissue translucent as wax paper. She then injected the scaffold with fresh heart (stem) cells from newborn rats.  Four days later, “We could see these little areas that were beginning to beat.  By eight days, we could see the whole heart beating.”  The experiment, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, marked the first time scientists had created a functioning heart in the lab from biological tissue.

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Argument #8:

2009 – Present day.  There are currently dozens of stem cell treatment centers around the world who are using adult stem cells to treat human patients and regrow both cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue and more.

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Conclusion:

This Australian breakthrough is not only based on the blatant ignorance or disregard of almost a decade of medical history and successful treatments around the world…it is also completely irrelevant to the current state of the technology!

This is like Ford Motors announcing today that they have invented seat belts. (Volvo had the first safety belts in 1849.)

It is time to put a stop to these erroneous, misinformed or purposely deceitful articles about stem cell facts, history and available treatments.


The Beauty of Stem Cells #2 – by Dr Douglas Cowan, Children’s Hospital Boston

In ALL ARTICLES on March 31, 2009 at 9:59 am

cowan_2-muscle-stem-cells

Muscle Stem Cells
(2 of 3)

The first three micrographs in this gallery show cells called myoblasts (a type of muscle cell) attached to spherical microcarriers. The microcarriers allow for the growth of the stem cells (shown in green), which, in this case, have been isolated from skeletal muscle. Photo: Douglas Cowan, Children’s Hospital Boston.

http://www.childrenshospital.org/research/cowan_gallery/photo3.html

The Beauty of Stem Cells #1 – by Dr Douglas Cowan, Children’s Hospital Boston

In ALL ARTICLES on March 31, 2009 at 9:53 am

cowan_1-muscle-stem-cells

Muscle Stem Cells

(1 of 1)

Doug Cowan, PhD, is interested in understanding the molecular and cellular biology of the cardiovascular system. He is especially interested in using engineered tissue and stem cells to improve heart function.

This gallery of micrographs (photographs taken through a microscope) gives a sampling of the work taking place in Dr. Cowan’s laboratory.

The first three micrographs in this gallery show cells called myoblasts (a type of muscle cell) attached to spherical microcarriers. The microcarriers allow for the growth of the stem cells (shown in green), which, in this case, have been isolated from skeletal muscle. Photo: Douglas Cowan, Children’s Hospital Boston.

Photo: Douglas Cowan, Children’s Hospital Boston.

http://www.childrenshospital.org/research/cowan_gallery/images/cowan_1.htm/trackback/

Stem Cell Breakthrough: Monitoring The On Switch That Turns Stem Cells Into Muscle

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 31, 2009 at 12:52 am

muscle-stem-cells

ScienceDaily (Mar. 30, 2009) — In a genetic engineering breakthrough that could help everyone from bed-ridden patients to elite athletes, a team of American researchers—including 2007 Nobel Prize winner Mario R. Capecchi—have created a “switch” that allows mutations or light signals to be turned on in muscle stem cells to monitor muscle regeneration in a living mammal.

For humans, this work could lead to a genetic switch, or drug, that allows people to grow new muscle cells to replace those that are damaged, worn out, or not working for other reasons (e.g., muscular dystrophy). In addition, this same discovery also gives researchers a new tool for the study of difficult-to-treat muscle cancers.

via Stem Cell Breakthrough: Monitoring The On Switch That Turns Stem Cells Into Muscle.

See also:

Health & Medicine

* Stem Cells

* Prostate Cancer

* Skin Cancer

* Brain Tumor

* Fibromyalgia

* Muscular Dystrophy

Reference

* Stem cell treatments

* Embryonic stem cell

* Biological tissue

* Motor neuron

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