DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘minnesota’

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 13, 2012 at 11:29 am

Twenty-two-years ago, a doctor performed the first umbilical cord transplant for leukemia in the U.S. He used stem cells from a newborn’s umbilical cord and found that they could clean up leukemia cells…Ten years later, in 2000, he learned that mixing cord blood from two different babies was even more effective. Now, he’s taking it a step further.  “What makes this particularly unique is that Derrick is the first person in the world to receive this therapy,” said Wagner.

https://i0.wp.com/www.mommymdguides.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/QuestionsSecondTrimesterCordBloodBanking2.jpg

gee I hope Texas rules in favor of stem cell treatments today or all of the leukemia patients who follow this guy will be screwed.  they will have to enter a clinical trial in 6 years or so with 30% chance of receiving the cord blood, made into a drug with side effects of course…a trial which excludes anyone with anything else wrong with them (do leukemia patients ever have other sicknesses? probably not.  i seem to remember hearing a lot: “he’s healthy as an ox…except for the leukemia of course). 

so this is good news.  in 10 years or so all you leukemia patients can get a drug…made from cord blood stem cells…with a fraction of the effectiveness…and lots of negative side effects…maybe…

because the truth is, if it’s that rare, then the market sales will not be large enough to pay back the 1/2 billion required to bring the drug to market – so it will never get made anyway…and wait, 10 years?  what’s the life expectancy for  “high-risk form(s) of leukemia which [can] not be cured by chemotherapy?”  never mind readers. skip this article, this doesn’t apply to you.  you’ll all be dead by then.

I REALLY hope Texas rules in favor of stem cell treatments today

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams

VIDEO – http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=6824750

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — He was set to go to college last fall and play baseball, but leukemia changed that. Now, an 18-year-old man is part of the first-of-its-kind treatment that may allow him to fulfill his dream.

Derrick Keller is supposed to be playing baseball for Southwest Minnesota State University, not sitting in a hospital bed at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital. But last summer, just before he was set to leave for college on a baseball scholarship, Derrick began feeling weak.

“For no reason just jogging to centerfield and back, playing catch, my muscles would get extremely tired and I wasn’t feeling myself,” said Keller.

A blood test confirmed his family’s worst fears. Keller had a high-risk form of leukemia which could not be cured by chemotherapy.

“It was unexpected. I would never expect to hear that news. I was normal and it was just weird, I guess,” said Keller.

College was no longer an option. Neither was baseball, which was probably the hardest thing for Keller. But after months in and out of the hospital, his luck was about to change.

“We were able to show that cord blood was a very effective way of curing leukemia,” said Dr. John Wagner, who believes he may be able to cure Keller.

Twenty-two-years ago, Wagner performed the first umbilical cord transplant for leukemia in the U.S. He used stem cells from a newborn’s umbilical cord and found that they could clean up leukemia cells.

Ten years later, in 2000, he learned that mixing cord blood from two different babies was even more effective. Now, with Keller, he’s taking it a step further.

“What makes this particularly unique is that Derrick is the first person in the world to receive this therapy,” said Wagner.

Wagner says Keller would receive an expanded number of stem cells, beyond anything they’ve done before. On Feb. 7, Keller received 73 times more stem cells than the average patient gets.

Wagner’s theory is that the more stem cells Keller receives, the quicker the recovery time and less hospital visits down the road. The surgery was a success and, so far, Keller looks and feels better.

“We think we should be able to cure him of leukemia where, six months from now, you had no idea he ever went through a transplant,” said Wagner.

That would make him a part of history. For Keller, the thought of going to college and being able to play the sport he loves is more thrilling than all of his home runs combined.

“It gets tough sitting here when all my friends are off at college doing that kind of stuff. As soon as I can get back to playing ball and being the normal me again, it will feel great,” said Keller.

Wagner says, if successful, this treatment could be used for both children and adults.

If Keller continues to heal as fast as he is, Wagner sees no reason he can’t go to Southwest Minnesota State in Marshall this fall, where a baseball scholarship is still waiting for him.

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams « CBS Minnesota.

Advertisements

University of Minnesota doctors use stem cells to regrow skin

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 12, 2010 at 12:25 am
University of Minnesota doctors use stem cells to regrow skin – 8.11.10 | Thomas Lee | Minneapolis, Minnesota

Dr. John Wagner, clinical director of the Stem Cell Institute, University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota said Wednesday that its researchers have successfully repaired damaged skin tissue using stem cells gleaned from bone marrow.

In a study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from the school’s Stem Cell Institute said the therapy can help patients who suffer from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), a painful genetic skin disorder that causes skin to blister and scrape off with the slightest friction or trauma…

Nate Liao in 2007, then 18 months old, has his bandages changed by his mother Theresa at the hospital in Minneapolis. Nate was born with a genetic condition called epidermolysis bullosa.

by Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY

Nate Liao in 2007, then 18 months old, has his bandages changed by his mother Theresa at the hospital in Minneapolis. Nate was born with a genetic condition called epidermolysis bullosa.

via University of Minnesota doctors use stem cells to regrow skin « MedCity News.

Snorting stem cells : UMNews : University of Minnesota

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 13, 2009 at 9:43 am

Amazing!  But…not surprising.  Did you know…

Dr Lima of Portugal has been treating SCI with Olfactory Mucosa stem cells for quite some time now.  Put simply…stem cells from the nose are neurological stem cells and have been used in treatments successfully since 2001!  Even more amazing…they can be used to treat spinal cord injury!!  – http://repairstemcells.org/Home/Science-Advisory-Board/Lima.aspx

(or as my Dad would say – “the NOSE KNOWS”)

– DG/StemCellBlogger

William Frey and his colleagues have found that “snorted” cells can bypass the blood-brain barrier and reach the brain.

By Deane Morrison

If you had a brain malady that could be treated with stem cells, how would you like them delivered—by having surgeons cut open your skull to implant the cells, or by snorting them like a nasal decongestant?

Not really a hard choice, is it?A University of Minnesota researcher has taken the first step toward making this kind of medical delivery service a reality by showing that when stem cells suspended in fluid are snorted, they rapidly migrate into the brain.

William Frey, an adjunct professor of pharmaceutics, and his colleagues in Tuebingen, Germany, describe their work in a recent article in the European Journal of Cell Biology.The method holds promise for delivering not only stem cells, but other therapeutic cells or drugs that can’t easily penetrate the blood-brain barrier…

Mom of Teen With Cancer Said It Was His Decision to Flee Court-Ordered Treatment – ABC News

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on May 26, 2009 at 10:20 am

I get very worried when the government tries to force anything.  my comments below the article. – dg

Mom of Teen With Cancer Said It Was His Decision to Flee Court-Ordered Treatment

In Interview With Production Company, 13-Year-Old Daniel Hauser Tells Public to ‘Back Off’ By SARAH NETTER and EMILY FRIEDMAN, May 26, 2009

The mother of a teenage boy stricken with cancer said it was the boy’s decision to flee the family’s Minnesota farm when a judge ordered him back into chemotherapy.

The mother and son on the run from chemotherapy return to Minnesota.

Now back home after nearly a week on the run, Colleen Hauser, who police said has not been charged in her 13-year-old son Daniel’s disappearance, said she had no choice but to go with him.

via Mom of Teen With Cancer Said It Was His Decision to Flee Court-Ordered Treatment – ABC News.

SO…the government and legal system want to give Daniel chemo for his own good

WHAT DOCTORS SAY ABOUT CHEMO:

Scientists based at McGill Cancer Centre sent a questionnaire to 118 lung cancer doctors to determine what degree of faith these practicing cancer physicians placed in the therapies they administered. They were asked to imagine that they had cancer and were asked which of six current trials they would choose.

79 doctors responded of which 64 would not consent to be in any trial containing Cisplatin – one of the common chemotherapy drugs they were trialling, (currently achieving worldwide sales of about $110,000,000 a year) and 58 of the 79 found that all the trials in question were unacceptable due to the ineffectiveness of chemotherapy and its unacceptably high degree of toxicity

When the cancer patient hears the doctor say “effective,” he or she thinks, and logically so, that “effective” means it cures cancer. But all it means is temporary tumor shrinkage.

Chemotherapy usually doesn’t cure cancer or extend life, and it really does not improve the quality of the life either. Doctors frequently make this claim though… http://www.alternativehealth.co.nz/cancer/chemo/index.htm

Besides chemo, what else do they want to give him?

CHEMOTHERAPY:

The treatment can be physically exhausting for the patient. Current chemotherapeutic techniques have a range of side effects mainly affecting the fast-dividing cells of the body. Important common side-effects include (dependent on the agent):

Secondary Neoplasm

The development of secondary neoplasia after successful chemotherapy and or radiotherapy treatment has shown to exist. The most common secondary neoplasm is secondary acute myeloid leukemia, which develops primarily after treatment with alkylating agents or topoisomerase inhibitors.[9] Other studies have shown a 13.5 fold increase from the general population in the incidence of secondary neoplasm occurrence after 30 years from treatment.[10]

Immunosuppression and myelosuppression

Virtually all chemotherapeutic regimens can cause depression of the immune system, often by paralysing the bone marrow and leading to a decrease of white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. The latter two, when they occur, are improved with blood transfusion. Neutropenia (a decrease of the neutrophil granulocyte count below 0.5 x 109/litre) can be improved with synthetic G-CSF (granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, e.g., filgrastim, lenograstim, Neupogen, Neulasta).

In very severe myelosuppression, which occurs in some regimens, almost all the bone marrow stem cells (cells that produce white and red blood cells) are destroyed, meaning allogenic or autologous bone marrow cell transplants are necessary. (In autologous BMTs, cells are removed from the patient before the treatment, multiplied and then re-injected afterwards; in allogenic BMTs the source is a donor.) However, some patients still develop diseases because of this interference with bone marrow.

Nausea and vomiting

Nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy; stomach upset may trigger a strong urge to vomit, or forcefully eliminate what is in the stomach.

Stimulation of the vomiting center results in the coordination of responses from the diaphragm, salivary glands, cranial nerves, and gastrointestinal muscles to produce the interruption of respiration and forced expulsion of stomach contents known as retching and vomiting. The vomiting center is stimulated directly by afferent input from the vagal and splanchnic nerves, the pharynx, the cerebral cortex, cholinergic and histamine stimulation from the vestibular system, and efferent input from the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ). The CTZ is in the area postrema, outside the blood-brain barrier, and is thus susceptible to stimulation by substances present in the blood or cerebral spinal fluid. The neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin stimulate the vomiting center indirectly via stimulation of the CTZ.

The 5-HT3 inhibitors are the most effective antiemetics and constitute the single greatest advance in the management of nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer. These drugs are designed to block one or more of the signals that cause nausea and vomiting. The most sensitive signal during the first 24 hours after chemotherapy appears to be 5-HT3. Blocking the 5-HT3 signal is one approach to preventing acute emesis (vomiting), or emesis that is severe, but relatively short-lived. Approved 5-HT3 inhibitors include Dolasetron (Anzemet), Granisetron (Kytril, Sancuso), and Ondansetron (Zofran). The newest 5-HT3 inhibitor, palonosetron (Aloxi), also prevents delayed nausea and vomiting, which occurs during the 2-5 days after treatment. A granisetron transdermal patch (Sancuso) was approved by the FDA in September 2008. The patch is applied 24-48 hours before chemotherapy and can be worn for up to 7 days depending on the duration of the chemotherapy regimen.

Another drug to control nausea in cancer patients became available in 2005. The substance P inhibitor aprepitant (marketed as Emend) has been shown to be effective in controlling the nausea of cancer chemotherapy. The results of two large controlled trials were published in 2005, describing the efficacy of this medication in over 1,000 patients.[11]

Some studies[12] and patient groups claim that the use of cannabinoids derived from marijuana during chemotherapy greatly reduces the associated nausea and vomiting, and enables the patient to eat. Some synthetic derivatives of the active substance in marijuana (Tetrahydrocannabinol or THC) such as Marinol may be practical for this application. Natural marijuana, known as medical cannabis is also used and recommended by some oncologists, though its use is regulated and not legal everywhere.[13]

Other side-effects

In particularly large tumors, such as large lymphomas, some patients develop tumor lysis syndrome from the rapid breakdown of malignant cells. Although prophylaxis is available and is often initiated in patients with large tumors, this is a dangerous side-effect that can lead to death if left untreated.

Some patients report fatigue or non-specific neurocognitive problems, such as an inability to concentrate; this is sometimes called post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, referred to as “chemo brain” by patients’ groups.[14]

Specific chemotherapeutic agents are associated with organ-specific toxicities, including cardiovascular disease (e.g., doxorubicin), interstitial lung disease (e.g., bleomycin) and occasionally secondary neoplasm (e.g., MOPP therapy for Hodgkin’s disease).

WELL…AS LONG AS IT’S FOR HIS OWN GOOD!

ADULT STEM CELLS – Laboratory-created heart : Future hope for treatment for cardiovascular disease – Sri Lanka

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 12:40 pm

(ADULT STEM CELL) Laboratory-created heart :

Future hope for treatment for cardiovascular disease

Wednesday, 31 December 2008 – 5:00 AM SL Time
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=C7m3vi_GGdc

Creating a replacement heart for some of the sickest patients may be one step closer, if new research in rats pans out in humans.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota were able to create a beating heart using the outer structure of one heart and injecting heart cells from another rat.

Their findings are reported in the journal Nature Medicine.

Rather than building a heart from scratch, which has often been mentioned as possible use for stem cells, this procedure takes a heart and breaks it down to the outermost shell. It`s similar to taking a house and gutting it, then rebuilding everything inside. In the human version, the patient`s own cells would be used.

via Laboratory-created heart : Future hope for treatment for cardiovascular disease – Sri Lanka.

A STEM CELL… INSURANCE MIRACLE?

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 9, 2009 at 12:36 am

A 3 year old boy is getting a repair stem cell transplant!

This is not an historic medical event…this barely registers as news.  Doctors have been using repair stem cells in order to prepare patient’s bodies for the ravages of high-dose chemotherapy for decades.

What is a miracle is that an insurance company is actually willing to pay for SOME of it!

A STEM CELL....INSURANCE MIRACLE?

Feb 8 2009 1:40PM -KXNewsTeam -AP-SDInsurance Stalemate,0160

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) A 3-year-old South Dakota boy whose brain tumor treatment had been in question because of an insurance dispute is to begin chemotherapy in Minnesota on Tuesday.

Cooper Urbaniak (ur-BAN’-ee-ak) is to be admitted to the University of Minnesota Medical Center to begin high-dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant.

The family’s insurance provider initially declared the procedure experimental and refused to pay for it. But under an agreement reached last month between Sanford Health Plan and the university, Sanford will pay for the chemotherapy and pay a discounted rate on the stem cell transplant.

The boy’s father, Joe Urbaniak, says his son will undergo eight days of chemotherapy treatments followed by a day of rest. Doctors then will give him back the stem cells they harvested earlier this fall.

The family is from Hereford, which is near Sturgis in western South Dakota.

By AP Writer Dirk Lammers (Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.) APNP 02-08-09 1330CST |

via 3yearold boy to begin chemo, stem cell treatment | KXNet.com North Dakota News.

%d bloggers like this: