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Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 3, 2010 at 9:26 am

“A medical research team led by University of Miami doctors injected stem cells into the hearts of pigs that had been damaged by heart attacks. Within two months, the doctors said, the stem cells made the pigs’ hearts good as new.”

Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage

August 2, 2010 By Fred Tasker

A medical research team led by University of Miami doctors injected stem cells into the hearts of pigs that had been damaged by heart attacks. Within two months, the doctors said, the stem cells made the pigs’ hearts good as new.

For humans, the research represents another promising step toward healing the damage from heart attacks, the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, killing more than 800,000 people a year.

The treatment resulted in rapid healing in the pigs, said Dr. Joshua Hare, a cardiologist at UM Medical School and director of its Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, where research was done.

“In two weeks, their heart function was almost back to normal. In two months, they were absolutely back to normal,” he said. “If we can achieve even 50 percent of that in humans, it will have a major impact.”

Hare said he hopes that within a decade, the procedure might be routine in humans, and that similar therapy might be available for the liver, kidney, pancreas, brain, even for strokes and limbs badly injured in battle.

The new study, published in the July 29 issue of Circulation Research, a journal of the American Heart Association, builds on another UM study published in December. In that study, immature “mesenchymnal” human stem cells extracted from bone marrow and infused into the hearts of human heart-attack victims made their hearts less prone to dangerous arrhythmias and better able to pump blood.

That study prompted widespread debate among scientists over how the stem cells were able to promote healing in the heart. The greatest significance of the new research that it explains the healing process, Hare says.

“Scientists always want to know why,” he said. “You can’t really go forward with research unless you understand what’s going on.”

Dr. Robert Simari, vice chairman of cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who had read the study but did not take part in it, supported its significance.

“This is a unique insight,” he said. “The field has been hindered by a lack of understanding of this mechanism. This shines new light on how these things work.”

The new UM study found that the stem cells helped the heart in two ways. First, some of the stem cells — injected into the heart via catheter into the groin and up the femoral artery — actually turned into new, healthy heart cells themselves. They replaced heart tissue killed by the heart attack, and became part of the heart muscle that contracts and beats to circulate the blood.

Another part of the injected stem cells didn’t turn into new heart cells but instead induced stem cells already existing in the heart to greatly multiply, building more heart muscle.

Doctors had known the human heart contained some of its own stem cells, whose function is to repair and regenerate the heart. The heart’s stem cells work like the stem cells in hair follicles, which induce the hair to grow back after a haircut, Hare said. But the heart was thought to have too few of them to fully repair itself.

In the new experiment, the injected stem cells caused an explosion of growth in the heart’s own stem cells, which turned into heart muscle cells.

“They helped create 20 times the number of the body’s own heart stem cells,” Hare said.

The study demonstrates another way to use immature human stem cells that avoids the use of embryonic stem cells, which are controversial because creating them destroys human embryos.

Another advantage is that the experiment worked with stem cells from the bone marrow of unrelated donors, which — for reasons not entirely clear yet — do not seem to carry the same risk of rejection by the recipient’s body, which is a serious problem with heart and kidney transplants.

Stem cells extracted from the patient’s own bone marrow also can be used, but they need three weeks of purification and proliferation to be ready, delaying treatment for the ailing heart.

New studies are under way to see which method — using cells from a donor or the patient — works better, Hare said.

(c) 2010, The Miami Herald.
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

via Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage.

Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells Transplant into Parkinson’s Disease Patients – Safe + Improve

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 11, 2010 at 11:48 am
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Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells Transplant into Parkinson’s Disease Patients is Safe and May Improve Their Quality of Life

michael_j_fox_011

Clinical study showing a minimally invasive approach was presented in The XVIII World Congress on Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders of the World Federation of Neurology.

(PRWEB) March 11, 2010 — Eight Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients were treated with their own bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) injected via minimally invasive routes and discharged the next morning without complications.

Evaluations with UPDRS, Hoehn & Yahr scale and Schwab & England score showed encouraging improvements and the total L- dopamine dose could be decreased suggesting that stem cells may enhance endogenous dopamine synthesis. As a matter of sample, the writing test pre versus post procedure showed significant changes.

Eight Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients were treated with their own bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) injected via minimally invasive routes and discharged the next morning without complications.

“It is high time we focused our efforts in what is possible and reachable and what suffering patients demand. Not all what is researched and developed in Petri dishes or rats can automatically be used in patients, so we should stop to augment their confusion. We expect this study in PD real patients, not in animals, draws the attention of those interested in getting clinical data since, funnily enough, there are billions of dollars spent in endless animal studies but very little in clinical ones” leader investigator Dr. Luis Geffner said.

  • this is a tool that may complement standard treatments and delay the progress of both the illness and the complications of the medication currently used to treat it. PD patients should be cared comprehensively; therefore, their treatment may include physical therapies as well as optimal medication and stem cells transplant, trying to improve their independence and self-care he added.

  • The treating doctor’s team has already transplanted 147 patients suffering from different illnesses or trauma states and many of them have been followed up 5 years showing that autologous adult BMSC neither provoke tumors, immunologic rejection, pain, infections nor arise ethical or religious controversies. That is why they stand to push these investigations forward.

  • This clinical study Transplant of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells into Parkinson’s Disease Patients Is Safe And May Improve Their Quality Of Life was shown in Miami on December 15th, 2009 in the XVIII World Congress on Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders organized by the World Federation of Neurology and published in December 2009 issue of Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders journal.

For more info on stem cells and Parkinson’s:

Muhammad Ali seeks ADULT STEM CELL treatment in Israel

60% PARKINSON’S PATIENTS IMPROVE AFTER REPAIR STEM CELL TREATMENT – PHYSICIANS CONFIRM RESULTS!

michael-j-fox-foundation-commits-up-to-5-75-million-in-funding-for-2010-critical-challenges-new-york-march-2-prnewswire-usnewswire/

Do Stem Cells Repair Damaged Brain Cells

Adult Stem Cells Reverse Heart Attack Damage

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 6, 2010 at 9:41 am

Proven safe and effective Repair Stem Cell Treatments for heart disease have been performed around the world for over half a decade. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/do-stem-cell-treatments-work/

Can Repair Stem Cell Treatments help your heart disease?

Adult stem-cell therapy continues to prove useful for treating heart disease patients, according to researchers at the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.

The study found that injecting stem cells into patients within 10 days of a heart attack could repair heart damage.

Researchers said it could be several years before there are federally approved cardiac stem-cell therapies [IN THE US].

Wesley J. Smith, senior fellow in human rights and bioethics at the Discovery Institute, said it demonstrates the effectiveness of stem cells that do not require the destruction of human embryos.

“It is a tremendous potential victory for medical science,” he said.

Jeff Karp, assistant professor at the Harvard Medical School, explained that the process may eliminate the need for drugs.

“You can take mesenchymal stem cells from one person,” he said, “implant them or inject them into another person and not require any matching or immune-suppressive drugs.”

via Illinois Federation for Right to Life: NEWS SHORTS FOR FRIDAY.

Stem Cells, Hyperbaric Chambers and Diabetes

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 29, 2009 at 12:30 pm
Diabetes Hope – Successful Pilot Study of Immature Adult Stem Cells

March 28, 2009

(ChattahBox)-A recent study published in the Journal of Cell Transplantation, offers new hope to the 24 million people in the US who suffer from type 2 diabetes and its harmful affects. The University of Miami Diabetes Research Institute, is conducting its first phase of human clinical trials, using immature adult stem cells from a patient’s own bone marrow. After treatment, symptoms significantly lessened, with increased insulin production, lower blood-sugar levels and a reduced need for those dreaded insulin injections.

University researchers conducted the successful pilot study with 25 sufferers of type 2 diabetes. Once they removed the stem cells from the patient’s bone marrow, it was purified and concentrated, and then injected into arteries near the pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing the insulin our bodies need.

The next phase of the novel treatment is right out of science fiction. The patients were enclosed in hyperbaric oxygen capsules for 10 hours, blasting their bodies with pure oxygen, at more than twice the amount of normal levels. The hyperbaric chambers are similar to ones used to treat divers with the “bends.”

Researchers found that the high levels of pure oxygen drew additional stem cells from the bone marrow, which joined up with the new cells injected near the pancreas, renewing the pancreas’ ability to make insulin on its own. Research director, Dr. Camillo Ricordi, believes this groundbreaking new treatment could eventually lead to wiping out type 2 diabetes. At the very least, it can ease the painful symptoms and the serious complications of type 2 diabetes.

The University of Miami is expanding its study to the countries of Argentina, Sweden and research centers in Asia. Over the next four years of further clinical trials, researchers are hopeful of obtaining FDA approval to offer the experimental treatment to more patients.

http://chattahbox.com/health/2009/03/28/diabetes-hope-successful-pilot-study-of-immature-adult-stem-cells/

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