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Posts Tagged ‘meniscal’

STEM CELL ‘LIVING BANDAGE’ FOR KNEE INJURIES

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 19, 2017 at 4:31 pm

Can we regrow a meniscus with stem cells?  Yes, of course.

  1. stem cells are harvested from the patient’s bone marrow
  2. cells are grown for 2 weeks
  3. cells are seeded onto a membrane scaffold
  4. the manufactured cell bandage is surgically implanted into the tear
  5. the cartilage is sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place

    All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation

Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans

December 16, 2016
Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans
Credit: University of Bristol

A ‘living bandage’ made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol.

Meniscal tears are suffered by over one million people a year in the US and Europe alone and are particularly common in contact sports like football and rugby. 90 per cent or more of tears occur in the white zone of meniscus which lacks a blood supply, making them difficult to repair. Many professional sports players opt to have the torn tissue removed altogether, risking osteoarthritis in later life.

The cell bandage has been developed by Bristol University spin-out company Azellon, and is designed to enable the meniscal tear to repair itself by encouraging cell growth in the affected tissue.

A prototype version of the cell bandage was trialled in five patients, aged between 18 and 45, with white-zone meniscal tears. The trial received funding support from Innovate UK and the promising results have been published today in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

The procedure involved taking , harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow, which were then grown for two weeks before being seeded onto a membrane scaffold that helps to deliver the cells into the injured site. The manufactured cell bandage was then surgically implanted into the middle of the tear and the cartilage was sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place.

All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation. By 24 months, three of the five patients retained an intact meniscus and had returned to normal knee functionality whilst the other two patients required surgical removal of the damaged meniscus due to a new tear or return of symptoms.

Professor Anthony Hollander, formerly of Bristol and now Chair of Stem Cell Biology at the University of Liverpool and Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Azellon, said: “The cell bandage trial results are very encouraging and offer a potential alternative to surgical removal that will repair the damaged tissue and restore full knee function.

“We are currently developing an enhanced version of the cell bandage using donor stem cells, which will reduce the cost of the procedure and remove the need for two operations.”

The cell bandage was produced by the Advanced Therapies Unit at the NHS Blood & Transplant facility in Speke, Liverpool and implanted into patients at Southmead Hospital in Bristol, under the supervision of Professor Ashley Blom, Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bristol.

Professor Blom, from Bristol’s School of Clinical Sciences, commented: “The cell bandage offers an exciting potential new treatment option for surgeons that could particularly benefit younger patients and athletes by reducing the likelihood of early onset osteoarthritis after meniscectomy.”

A spokesperson for Innovate UK said: “Turning into clinical and commercial reality requires close collaboration between businesses, universities, and Hospitals. It’s great to see this inter-disciplinary approach has led to such an exciting outcome from this first-in-human trial.”

Explore further: Pioneering stem cell bandage receives approval for clinical trial

More information: Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First-in-Human Study, , DOI: 10.1002/sctm.16-0199, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sctm.16-0199/abstract

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-12-stem-cell-bandage-knee-injuries.html#jCp

HEARTS and KNEES – Patient, heal thyself | sciencebuz

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 21, 2012 at 9:20 am

“The first study…uses stem cell therapy to repair heart tissue damaged by coronary heart disease. Of the 16 patients injected with autologous CSCs, 14 showed an increase in Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF)…In seven of the patients, infarct (dead tissue) size decreased by 24 % at the end of 4 months, and a further 6 % at the end of a year. Both these results indicate CSCs had a positive impact on heart tissue regeneration.

The second study…focuses on using autologous stem cell therapy for repair of torn meniscal tissue…The “Cell Bandage” from Azellon will use patients own, expanded stem cells, harvested from the bone marrow…will grow into new menisci-type cells and heal the tear. The results of in vitro trials have so far been very promising. Phase I clinical trials are set to begin May 2012.”

https://i2.wp.com/www.designmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/5417124292_6a49ef3983.jpg

Two reports in the press this week focus on the use of autologous (patient’s own) stem cells for repair of damaged tissue.

The first study, led by Professor Roberto Bolli, of the University of Louisville, reports on early findings of a phase I clinical trial, which uses stem cell therapy to repair heart tissue damaged by coronary heart disease. Cardiac tissue, harvested from the patient during surgery, was used to  isolate autologous cardiac stem cells (CSCs). CSCs were grown in the laboratory till their numbers reached around 2 million cells. At this stage the cells were re-injected back at the site of tissue damage.

Of the 16 patients injected with autologous CSCs, 14 showed an increase in Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) – the amount of blood a left ventricle pumps through the aorta during each contraction of the heart, 4 months after infusion. In seven of the patients, infarct (dead tissue) size decreased by 24 % at the end of 4 months, and a further 6 % at the end of a year. Both these results indicate CSCs had a positive impact on heart tissue regeneration.

The second study, led by Professor Anthony Hollander, of Azellon Ltd, a University of Bristol spin-out company, focuses on using autologous stem cell therapy for repair of torn meniscal tissue. The menisci are found at the knee joints, and they act as shock absorbers for the knee. This tissue is often damaged as a result of sport-related injury, especially contact sports such as football or rugby.

Current treatment options include knee arthroscopy surgery, which involves removing part or whole of the damaged meniscal tissue. This reduces the shock-absorbing properties at the knee joint and leaves the patient vulnerable to early-onset osteoarthritis, eventually followed by total knee replacement.

The “Cell Bandage” from Azellon will use patients own, expanded stem cells, harvested from the bone marrow. These cells are seeded onto a special biocompatible membrane, which will be inserted at the site of damage using a simple surgical procedure.  Given the right conditions, the hope is that stem cells will grow into new menisci-type cells and heal the tear. The results of in vitro trials have so far been very promising. Phase I clinical trials are set to begin May 2012.

Patient, heal thyself | sciencebuz.

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