DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘lung’

STEM CELLS FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS

In DISEASE INFO, HEALTH AND WELLNESS, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on January 31, 2017 at 10:56 am

“[Bob]  received an infusion of cells called allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), adult stem cells collected from the bone marrow of healthy volunteers”

“CF’s main effect is on the lungs. They fill with a sticky mucus as a reaction – really an over-reaction – by the body’s immune system to bacteria. The lungs are the source for much of the illness and shortened lifespan seen in CF.”

cystic-fibrosis-the_fluorescent_microscopy_image_of_cftr_tagged_with_eyfp

CYSTIC FIBROSIS The_fluorescent_microscopy_image_of_CFTR_tagged_with_EYFP

First stem cell study could lead to development of therapy to reduce inflammation caused by CF

Published on January 31, 2017 at 3:24 AM · 

A 39-year-old man with cystic fibrosis (CF) made history by becoming the first person to receive human adult stem cells in a new research study that researchers hope will someday lead to the development of a therapy to reduce the inflammation and infection caused by CF.

The pioneering subject in the study is Bob Held from Alliance, Ohio, who on Jan. 26 received an infusion of cells called allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), adult stem cells collected from the bone marrow of healthy volunteers. Mr. Held was diagnosed with CF when he was 16 months old.

Currently, there is no cure for CF, and life expectancy for patients who survive into adulthood is approximately 41 years of age.

“It was a very exciting day for us with the very first participant in the first stem cell trial for cystic fibrosis,” said James Chmiel, MD, the principal investigator of the study at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital.

The Phase 1 trial will assess the safety and tolerability of hMSCs in adult patients with CF.

“This is an early phase trial, and the most important thing is to ensure safety,” said Dr. Chmiel. “This study consists of a single infusion of stem cells. We will follow the study participants for a year to make sure it’s safe. Before applying any therapy on a broad basis, we want to make sure that it’s safe.”

While the goal of the study is safety, Dr. Chmiel hopes this is a first step towards the ultimate goal of developing a therapy to reduce lung inflammation and infection, resulting in longer and healthier lives for people with CF.

“While there’s been a tremendous increase in survival for people with CF from when I entered the field in the 1990s, that’s still not good enough,” said Dr. Chmiel, Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics Development Center at UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital and Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “While we’ve made great progress, we still have a long way to go.”
The stem cells that Mr. Held received were collected from the bone marrow of a healthy adult volunteer. UH is a national leader in the use of stem cell therapy with hMSCs. Researchers from UH, along with the CWRU School of Medicine, discovered hMSCs. The hMSCs possess many properties that are ideal for the treatment of inflammatory and degenerative diseases, and they possess natural abilities to detect changes in their environment, such as inflammation. The hope is that hMSCs can reduce the inflammation in the lungs caused by CF.

CF’s main effect is on the lungs. They fill with a sticky mucus as a reaction – really an over-reaction – by the body’s immune system to bacteria. The lungs are the source for much of the illness and shortened lifespan seen in CF.

“One of the issues in CF is that people with the disease get bacterial infections in their lungs, and these bacteria incite a vigorous and excessive inflammatory response,” explained Dr. Chmiel. “It’s actually the body’s inflammatory response that damages the lungs. The inflammatory response tries to eliminate the bacteria, but it’s not successful. Instead, the inflammatory system releases molecules that damage the individual’s own airways. The lung disease causes much of the illness and is responsible for the majority of the mortality of the disease.”

The stem cells are donated by healthy adult volunteers who go through a rigorous screening process. The stem cells are cultured in the UH stem cell facility. Volunteers with CF who are in the study receive an infusion through an IV.
“Once in the patient’s body, the stem cell tracks to the area where there’s a significant amount of inflammation, and they take up residence there. The stem cells then respond to the environment, and hopefully reverse some of the abnormalities,” said Dr. Chmiel. “We hope in future studies to demonstrate that the stem cells reduce the infection and inflammation and return the lungs to a more normal state.”

“This therapy aims to turn down the inflammatory response, not eliminate it because we still have to keep the bacteria in check. We want to reduce inflammation and the subsequent lung damage caused by inflammation without allowing the bacteria to proliferate,” said Dr. Chmiel.

A total of 15 clinically stable adults with CF will be enrolled in the study. Support for the study is from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

The patient, Mr. Held, considers himself fortunate to be close to 40 with CF. When he was growing up, he said he’d miss 50 days of school each year because of the disease. Every day, he needs to breathe in aerosols for about two hours in the morning and 1-1/2 hours before bed to keep his lungs functioning. While he hasn’t been sick from the illness since his late teens, he does check himself into the hospital a couple of times a year for precautionary measures and to prevent himself from “getting into a valley” with CF.

His late wife, Michelle, died of CF seven years ago. They had met when they were kids, but didn’t get married until 2012. She died from the disease suddenly 28 days after they married.

“My only regret is that I didn’t ask her out sooner,” said Mr. Held.
He is participating in the study to carry on Michelle’s legacy, and “I am hoping the future generations of CF patients can get better treatments and that eventually a cure will be found for them,” he said.

WHY SMOKING CAUSES CANCER

In DISEASE INFO, HEALTH AND WELLNESS, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on January 30, 2017 at 7:30 pm
Lung stem cells cultured in the laboratory. The green, blue and purple colors emerging from behind the orbs are a protein expressed by lung basal stem cells. Photo: Clare Weeden, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

For four years straight medical researcher Clare Weeden would go on alert whenever lung surgery was underway anywhere across Melbourne. No matter the time, she would have to be ready in her lab to receive samples of fresh tissue as part of a project to isolate and research the stem cells that repair our lungs as they constantly breathe in contaminants from air pollution to cigarette smoke.

She didn’t know it at the time, but she was hot on the trail of the lung’s basal stem cells that now appear to be the likely culprits that trigger a major lung cancer closely tied to smoking – squamous cell carcinoma. It is the second most common form of lung cancer.

Basal stems cells are very quick at repairing DNA damage caused by inhaled chemicals such as those from cigarette smoke, but they are prone to making mistakes. It means that the more repair work they have to do, the greater the chance of a cancer-causing mutation.

“What we have found is a genetic fingerprint in squamous cell carcinoma that has been left from basal stem cells in the lung whose repair work has gone awry and led to the cancer,” says Weeden, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne.

“It isn’t definitive but the evidence is that lung basal stem cells are the likely cells of origin.”

The unmasking of basal stem cells, published in the Public Library of Science: Biology, is the culmination of years of painstaking laboratory work and data-crunching that has now provided a crucial new target for developing drugs that may be able to turn off the progress of the cancer.

Weeden was sometimes up until to 3am at the Institute isolating and processing cells from the freshly operated-on lung tissue, especially when there was a flurry of samples in one day. It is a complex process that took up to six hours for each of the eventual 140 samples.

The Clue

But one day she came across a sample that she could barely get to grow at all.

Intrigued, she contacted the Victorian Cancer Biobank for basic information on the donor. It was likely that the donor was a smoker or ex-smoker since most people having lung surgery have a history of smoking. But this patient had never smoked. Sensing a possible link she went back to the Biobank to get information on all the previous tissue donors, and over that weekend plotted out a chart.

The correlation was stark. Samples from those that had never smoked had low basal cell growth, and the more heavily a patient had smoked, the higher the growth rate.

“It completely grabbed my curiosity,” she says. “I remember on Monday morning going straight into my supervisor’s office (Marie-Liesse Asselin-Labat) and putting the chart down in front of her. We both realized we were onto something significant. The question was what?”

By using the same process that Weeden had developed to accurately isolate lung stem cells, she and Asselin-Libat set to examine how the basal stem cells worked.

They discovered that basal stem cells were very efficient at repairing damaged DNA but that the process the cells use, called non-homologous repair, is prone to making errors that can lead to cancer-causing mutations. In non-homologous repair the break in a damaged DNA chain is simply closed over rather than copied. They also found evidence of the accumulation of mutations in the basal stem cells of the smokers.

“While we need more experimentation, this gave us a model of what may be happening,” says Weeden. “Our lungs are constantly being exposed to what we inhale. When we breathe in something like cigarette smoke that causes lung damage, these basal cells receive a signal to grow and repair the damage.

But they have to first repair their own DNA damage and the process they use is very quick. The advantage is that it helps the cells to survive, but the disadvantage is that they are prone to making errors that can lead to cancer.”

To test that model they turned to Institute bioinfomaticians Professor Gordon Smyth and Yunshun (Andy) Chen who used statistics and computer science to extract a genetic “signature” for lung basal stem cells. They then compared that signature with the genetics of various lung cancers.

clear evidence

They discovered that this same signature was highly correlated with lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer and the most closely linked to smoking – some 96 per cent of people with lung squamous cell carcinoma are either smokers or ex-smokers. It was clear evidence that basal stem cells are the likely culprits in how the cancer is triggered.

By identifying a cell of origin Weeden says we now have a drug target to aim at that has the potential to stop the progress of the cancer. Previous Institute research in 2009 lead by Professor Jane Visvader and Professor Geoff Lindeman had similarly identified a likely cell of origin for inherited breast cancer, and last year that same team identified an existing drug, denosumab, that in laboratory models could switch off the problematic cell growth and curtail the cancer. Clinical trials are now underway.

“In the breast cancer research they similarly used correlations to identify a cell of origin like we have and now further work has solidified that,” says Weeden.

Does this mean that at some point in the future smokers could breathe easier by taking a drug that could stop the cancer being triggered? No. Weeden points out that if someone took such a drug and continued to smoke the damage could be even worse than the cancer.

“Basal stem cells have a job to do in the lung, they repair any damage. If a person was treated with a drug that turned off basal cells and continued to smoke, I would imagine that other lung problems may develop due to the inability of the stem cell to repair the lung airways from cigarette smoke-induced damage,” says Weeden. She points out that smoking also causes other lung cancers that don’t arise from basal stem cells.

She says the biggest beneficiaries of any such drug could be ex-smokers. “This is particularly relevant as lung squamous cell carcinoma can occur in ex-smokers who have quit perhaps 20 or 30 years ago.

“But the best way to reduce the risk of lung cancer is to simply quit smoking because no matter how long you’ve smoked for, the risk of lung cancer is reduced when you quit.”

NON SMOKERS GET LUNG CANCER

In DISEASE INFO, HEALTH AND WELLNESS, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on January 26, 2017 at 2:00 pm

‘Lung cancer is almost always fatal because it is asymptomatic. “Symptoms of lung cancer (chronic cough, shortness of breath, phlegm in lungs) are very similar to common respiratory illnesses”’

Can people get lung cancer if they don’t smoke?

smoke-industrial-sky

Lung cancer is responsible for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths in the nation.

Although this type is especially common in people who smoke cigarettes, it is possible for the disease to occur in non-smokers and yes, sometimes even in those who aren’t often breathing secondhand smoke.

A Texas A&M College of Medicine Radiation Oncologist breaks down the science behind lung cancer and the environmental hazards that could result in a diagnosis.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates 224,000 new cases of lung cancer will be diagnosed in 2016.

“This means up to 13 percent of all projected cancers this year could be lung cancer,” said Niloy J. Deb, MD, Assistant Professor of radiology with the Texas A&M College of Medicine and Chairman.

“The leading cause of diagnosis is due to smoking cigarettes, but there are other instances where the cancer can occur.”

Secondhand smoke—like breathing car exhaust into your lungs

Do you live with friends or family who smoke cigarettes? If so, you’re at a much higher risk for developing lung cancer.

“Exposure to secondhand smoke is the number one cause of lung cancer in non-smokers,” Deb said. “Non-smokers who are constantly exposed to secondhand smoke increase their likelihood of getting lung cancer by 20 percent.”

buttout

So, how exactly does secondhand smoke up your chances for lung cancer? Deb said even smoke indirectly inhaled from a cigarette is damaging to the lungs.

“Chronic smoking impairs the tiny alveoli (small sacs that move oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and bloodstream) in our lungs, and these alveoli start ‘trapping’ air,” he said.

“Cigarette smoke, with all the dissolved carcinogens, will then ‘sit’ in the alveoli, which causes the genetic mutations (changes) that cause cancerous transformation.”

Important to know: The most harmful part of cigarette smoke comes from the burning paper. This is because compounds are added to the wrapping to allow the tobacco and paper to burn at the same rate.

“To do this, companies add tar and other petroleum derivatives to the paper around cigarettes,” Deb said. “So, when you inhale smoke from a cigarette, it’s essentially like breathing car exhaust directly into your lungs.”

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Carcinogens activate the ‘switch’ for cancer cell mutation

Cancer happens when a cell’s DNA is changed, and there are certain known substances and exposures that can lead to cancer; these are called carcinogens.

According to the ACS, carcinogens don’t always cause cancer in every case, but they may predispose to cancer in other ways.

“Some environmental carcinogens like asbestos, silica, benzene, ethylene oxide, and exposure to nickel compounds and by-products of petroleum distillation from vehicle exhaust and fossil fuels, can lead to lung cancer,” Deb said.

“These substances flip the genetic switches in our body by turning on a cancer activator or turning off a cancer suppressor.”

For example: For a cancer cell to form in our lungs, there must be an on/off switch flipped in the genetic code of the lung cells. “When a carcinogen flicks the ‘on’ switch, it turns on a gene that converts a normal cell into a cancer cell,” Deb said.

“When a carcinogen hits the ‘off’ switch, it’s turning off a gene that has been preventing a cancerous process or cancer cell formation. These switches can be flipped because of exposure to environmental carcinogens.”

Why lung cancer is a killer

Lung cancer is almost always fatal because it is asymptomatic. “Symptoms of lung cancer (chronic cough, shortness of breath, phlegm in lungs) are very similar to common respiratory illnesses,” Deb said.

“Most patients (both smokers and non-smokers) do not know their symptoms may be caused by cancer instead of a relatively benign illness.”

Most people who are diagnosed with lung cancer live with symptoms for years before seeking any medical opinion, and by then, it’s too late.

“This is why most lung cancers are diagnosed at Stage 3 or Stage 4 and the reason approximately 158,000 people die from lung cancer each year,” Deb said.

“The death rate increases when you can’t catch the cancer at an earlier stage, when there are more treatment options available.”

CELEBRATE 420!!! POT, WEED, MARIJUANA REDUCES CANCER, TUMORS

In ALL ARTICLES on April 20, 2011 at 11:02 am
Today is April 20th but besides that it is also 420. What is 420?

What does 420 mean? There are varying theories on the origin of 420. Some say that 420 originated from a police code that announces marijuana use is taking place. Yet another story is that a group of guys (Waldo’s) in the 1970’s made 4:20 their official meeting time to smoke marijuana after school. Whether or not 4:20 p.m. is the best time of day for your first hit depends on your own body, your own needs. Some folks feel that waiting until 4:20 enhances ones appreciation of the herb. Of course, your mileage may vary.

    • In the 21st Century, 420 is firmly established as a code amongst tokers, a time of day and even sort of a toker’s New Year’s Day. It’s in our culture now and only time will tell where it ends up.

      April 20th (4/20) is another usage, meaning that it is time for to plant before the summer.

      Whatever the real story is, 420 has been an important part of the marijuana culture since the 1970’s. The significance of 420 has been kept underground and is mostly known only among marijuana smokers. Many non-smokers aren’t aware of the symbolism when they see someone wearing a T-shirt or baseball cap that says 420 across the front.

      When the 420 icon is somehow discreetly worked into a mainstream product like a film, marijuana users take notice. The film Pulp Fiction is rumored to have had all clocks throughout the movie set to 4:20. Marijuana smokers familiar with the symbol picked up on it—most people, however, did not.

      While some marijuana smokers are using 420 as a code that enables them to openly speak about marijuana in front of parents or teachers. 420 has been to some, a sacred symbol for nearly 30 years.

      Simply put, 420 is a symbol of cannabis and its culture. Today, April 20th events are international, and 4:20 pm has become sort of a world wide “burn time”.

    • U.S. Government Repressed Marijuana-Tumor ResearchAlternet, May 31, 2000
      Title: Pot Shrinks Tumors; Government Knew in ‘74
      Author: Raymond Cushing
      http://www.alternet.org/print.html?StoryID=9257

      Faculty Evaluator: Mary King M.D.
      Student researchers: Jennifer Swift, Licia Marshall,

      Corporate media coverage: AP and UPI news wires 2/29/00

      A Spanish medical team’s study released in Madrid in February 2000 has shown that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active chemical in marijuana, destroys tumors in lab rats. These findings, however, are not news to the U.S. government. A study in Virginia in 1974 yielded similar results but was suppressed by the DEA, and in 1983 the Reagan/Bush administration tried to persuade U.S. universities and researchers to destroy all cannabis research work done between 1966 and 1976, including compendiums in libraries…http://www.projectcensored.org/top-stories/articles/22-us-government-repressed-marijuana-tumor-research/

    • ‎”Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids,” an article in a 1975 Journal of the National Cancer Institute –The summary of the Virginia study begins, “Lewis lung adenocarcinoma growth was retarded by the oral administration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinol (CBN)” — two types of cannabinoids, a family of active components in marijuana. “Mice treated for 20 consecutive days with THC and CBN had reduced primary tumor size.”

      The 1975 journal article doesn’t mention breast cancer tumors, which featured in the only newspaper story ever to appear about the 1974 study — in the Local section of the Washington Post on August 18, 1974. Under the headline, “Cancer Curb Is Studied,” it read in part:

      “The active chemical agent in marijuana curbs the growth of three kinds of cancer in mice and may also suppress the immunity reaction that causes rejection of organ transplants, a Medical College of Virginia team has discovered.” The researchers “found that THC slowed the growth of lung cancers, breast cancers and a virus-induced leukemia in laboratory mice, and prolonged their lives by as much as 36 percent.” – http://www.alternet.org/story/9257/comments/?page=2

“Dwarf’s (lung) standing on the shoulders of giant’s (heart)”

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on July 15, 2010 at 1:12 pm

“Dwarf’s (lung) standing on the shoulders of giant’s (heart)”

(Latin: nanos gigantium humeris insidentes) is a Western metaphor meaning “One who develops future intellectual pursuits by understanding the research and works created by notable thinkers of the past.

A dwarf standing on the shoulders of a giant

—————————————

Lungssss, get yer lungs here!

Soon enough, organs grown from YOUR OWN stem cells will be available at a store near you.  What began as the outlandish quest of one woman in 1998…one woman who swam against a huge tidal flow of scientists and doctors telling her she was out of her mind…is now, almost 20 years later, hitting mainstream science, academia and media.

Who is this woman and what did she do?  You’ve probably never heard of her (unless you’ve read my book – “Super Stemmys) but she will most likely go down in history as the mother of 21st century patient specific organ regeneration. Organs, btw, that are both rejection free and require no immunosuppressive drugs. In other words…

YOUR OWN organs grown from YOUR OWN stem cells.”

Here’s how it all started…

1998 – Dr Doris Taylor takes stem cells from the thigh of a rabbit, injects them into scar tissue in the animal’s heart and repairs the damaged muscle.  Published in Nature Medicine.

2002 – Dr Taylor herself witnessed, in Rotterdam, the first patient in the world to get stem cells injected through a catheter into the wall of the heart. Encouraging results began to come in—improved ejection fractions, reduced diameters, thicker muscle tissue.

2005 – Advancements continue as Dr Taylor rinses rat hearts with detergent until the cells washed away and all that remained was a skeleton of tissue translucent as wax paper. She then injected the scaffold with fresh heart (stem) cells from newborn rats.  Four days later, “We could see these little areas that were beginning to beat.  By eight days, we could see the whole heart beating.”  The experiment, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, marked the first time scientists had created a functioning heart in the lab from biological tissue.

Read it again! Doctor Doris Taylor grew a new heart in a lab 5 YEARS AGO!

So congrats to the docs at Harvard Medical School for growing a lung…just don’t forget that Dr Doris Taylor’s heart is the giant on whose shoulders your lung is standing. -dg

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Stem cell scientists unveil lab-grown lung – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

By Kellie Lazzaro

Updated Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:04am AEST

Harvard doctors used stem cells to generate the organ. (Supplied: Harald C Ott)

A decellularized rat lung. Harvard doctors have used stem cells to generate the artificial organ

Artificial lung: a recellularized lung in a bioreactor during organ culture (Supplied: Harald C Ott)

Artificial lung: a recellularized lung in a bioreactor during organ culture (Supplied: Harald C Ott)

First breath: the recellularized rat lung takes in air at the end of the organ culture period (Supplied: Harald C Ott )

American researchers have provided some hope for the hundreds of Australians languishing on organ-transplant waiting lists.

Doctors at the Harvard Medical School have used stem cells to construct a miniature lung, which functioned for up to six hours when transplanted into a rat.

Lung transplant specialists say the research is a significant breakthrough in efforts to develop ways to expand the organ donor pool.

For the 50 million people worldwide with end-stage lung disease, the only definitive treatment is a transplant.

Kate Hayne, 66, waited four years for a double lung transplant after she was diagnosed with bronchiectasis.

“You’re waiting for the phone to ring and it doesn’t ring and you’re life is getting narrower and narrower because you can do less and less and less,” she said.

“You’re basically waiting to die … and a lot of people do die.

“I met some lovely people who didn’t survive the wait.”

It is hoped the research by the Harvard Medical School in Boston will go some way towards improving the chances of survival.

Dr Harald Ott and his team removed the cells from a rat lung and rebuilt the organ blueprint using human umbilical and foetal rat cells.

Within about a week that lung began exchanging oxygen like normal lungs and was transplanted into a rat where it continued functioning for six hours.

“There’s a lot of work to do in up scaling this now from rats to human-sized organs,” he said.

“But I think that we are looking at a situation where over the next five to 10 years we might be seeing more regenerated products to actually hit the patients’ side.”

Professor Allan Glanville, the medical head of lung transplantation at Sydney’s St Vincent’s Hospital, says specialists in Australia are watching with interest.

“This is extraordinarily exciting work and it lays the groundwork for the beginning of the development of a inartificial lung that might benefit so many people,” he said.

Dr Michael Musk, who heads the West Australian Lung Transplant program, agrees the research is a huge step forward.

“It hopefully means we don’t need the degree or amount of immunosuppression required, which is associated with a lot of side effects,” he said.

“It would not only improve donor pool, but also improve the quality of life.”

The research is published today in the journal Nature Medicine (see Technical Report abstract below).

via Stem cell scientists unveil lab-grown lung – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).


Nature Medicine
Published online: 13 July 2010 | doi:10.1038/nm.2193

Regeneration and orthotopic transplantation of a bioartificial lung

Harald C Ott1, Ben Clippinger1, Claudius Conrad1, Christian Schuetz1, Irina Pomerantseva1, Laertis Ikonomou2, Darrell Kotton2 & Joseph P Vacanti1


About 2,000 patients now await a donor lung in the United States. Worldwide, 50 million individuals are living with end-stage lung disease. Creation of a bioartificial lung requires engineering of viable lung architecture enabling ventilation, perfusion and gas exchange. We decellularized lungs by detergent perfusion and yielded scaffolds with acellular vasculature, airways and alveoli. To regenerate gas exchange tissue, we seeded scaffolds with epithelial and endothelial cells. To establish function, we perfused and ventilated cell-seeded constructs in a bioreactor simulating the physiologic environment of developing lung. By day 5, constructs could be perfused with blood and ventilated using physiologic pressures, and they generated gas exchange comparable to that of isolated native lungs. To show in vivo function, we transplanted regenerated lungs into orthotopic position. After transplantation, constructs were perfused by the recipient’s circulation and ventilated by means of the recipient’s airway and respiratory muscles, and they provided gas exchange in vivo for up to 6 h after extubation.


To read this technical report in full you will need to login or make a payment at Nature Medicine.  – http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.2193.html

Breathing Easier with Adult Stem Cells

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on December 3, 2009 at 1:14 pm

Several recent reports, using animal models, provide evidence for treating lung disorders with adult stem cells.

Premature babies are often placed on ventilators to deliver oxygen and expand underdeveloped lungs, but the high oxygen and mechanical ventilation can lead to lung inflammation, inhibit proper lung growth, and lead to long-term complications. Work out of Children’s Hospital in Boston found that bone marrow stromal cells, a type of adult stem cell, can reduce inflammation in lung tissue. Using newborn mice as a model, the researchers injected adult bone marrow stem cells intravenously. The cells migrated to the lungs and prevented inflammation. The cells seem to work by secreting protective and stimulatory factors that help the lung cells and blood vessels; the same effects could be obtained by injecting the growth medium in which the adult stem cells had been grown. The results are published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Similar results have been published by an international team, led by Canadian scientist Dr. Bernard Thébaud at the Stollery Children’s Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta. Using a rat model, the scientists found that adult stem cells from bone marrow could repair lung damage in newborn rats as well as prevent further damage. According to Dr. Thébaud:

“The really exciting thing that we discovered was that stem cells are like little factories, pumping out healing factors.”

These results are also published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

More breathable news comes from a team in South Korea led by Dr. Won Soon Park from the Samsung Medical Center. Using newborn laboratory rats with oxygen-deprived lung injury, the researchers found that mesenchymal stem cells, a type of adult stem cell from umbilical cord blood, had a protective effect against low-oxygen-induced lung injury. They noted that their findings could have important therapeutic potential for the currently untreatable hyperoxic neonatal lung disease, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), in premature human infants. The easy availability of umbilical cord blood is also an associated benefit. The results are published in the journal Cell Transplantation.

And in a final breath of adult stem cell fresh air, a team at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine identified adult stem cells in the bone marrow of mice that could prevent and treat acute lung injury. The researchers discovered a way to grow and stimulate the adult stem cells, and when injected into mice with acute lung injury, the cells repaired the lung injury, prevented fluid build-up and improved survival of the mice. Results were published in the journal Stem Cells.

So take a deep breath in appreciation of adult stem cells.

via FRC Blog » Breathing Easier with Adult Stem Cells.

CONSIDERING STEM CELLS FOR LUNG DISEASE, ALI, COPD?

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 6, 2009 at 11:52 am

DEEP BREATH!

BELIEVE IT OR NOT,  you should consider yourself very lucky!

  • There are a number of top-notch facilities around the world that are successfully treating lung disease.
  • The lungs are the greediest organ in the body when it comes to stem cells so any treatment has a high potential of success than most.

INFO ON STEM CELLS AND LUNG DISEASE/EMPHYSEMA
Here are a number of articles and a description of the procedure at the bottom for your review.
Please be aware that the US is years behind the rest of the world in regard to stem cell treatments.
Also, the only treatments I would consider, use adult stem cells, not embryonic stem cells.
This is a scientific/medical bias, not a religious one.  Adult stem cells work, embryonic do not.

STEM CELL THERAPY PROCESS FOR LUNG DISEASE:
Procedure to implant the patient’s own Adult Stem Cells into the lungs
(this is one of the more popular techniques to give you an idea of what’s involved):

1.A very thin special needle is injected into the crest of the patient’s iliac bone and bone marrow is drawn out
2.The aspirated bone marrow is then taken next door into the lab and put into a centrifuge. The stem cells are separated, filtered (to remove some bone remains)
3.2-3 hours later, the stem cells are injected into the veins and go directly to the lungs.

What Do The Adult Stem Cells Do In the Lungs?
The lungs grab and keep the stem cells and the alveolus starts regenerating. What happens here is that dead cells in the alveolus of the lungs leave empty spaces or niches or little caves, into which the stem cells settle down and start growing, reproducing and rebuilding the alveolus.

The stem cells go to the lungs directly as all blood passes through the lungs before going to the heart, lungs are a sort of a trap and the stem cells stay there. Recovery does not happen immediately for obvious reasons, but it takes from 3 to 6 months, though the patient starts reducing his oxygen consumption as from the 4th week onwards. How much he can reduce his oxygen consumption depends on his actual condition, how his body may react and many other factors.

Sometimes, quite rare, a second implant is required about 6 to 12 months later, for reinforcement. If this would be the case, some Doctors do not charge any additional medical fees, just the out of pocket expenses coming with it, such as hospital, hotel accommodation, ground transportation and airfares.  That doesn’t sound like a bad deal at all. In other words, if it doesn’t work, a patient can try again at minimal expense.

More On The Stem Cell Treatment For COPD and Emphysema
The patient is requested to arrive at one of the Treatment Centers one day prior treatment, for pre-treatment tests. The next day, the patient gets his stem cell treatment done and it is very probable he will be discharged from hospital on the same day or next morning, but he is requested to stay at a hotel nearby for observation purposes for 2 more days at least.

No Pain, No Gain With Adult Stem Cells
The patient normally does not have any pain during or after treatment, though if necessary he will get some analgesic, such as an Aspirin or Advil pill, that is all he will need. He will be at least in the same condition for traveling back as he was when he arrived. Afterwards, the patient will get his follow up by his regular attending physician, but the patient will always be able to keep in touch with the doctor whom performed the procedure.

No Rejection, No Side Effects From Your Own Stem Cells
There is no rejection as the patient gets his own cells and there are no side effects, collateral effects nor consequences of the treatment. If some of the injected Stem Cells would escape from the lungs and go to some other organs, there is no harm, just the opposite- benefits for that organ!

Feel free to contact me again if I can be of further assistance.

CATCH UP! – Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury

In CATCH UP! on October 29, 2009 at 3:28 am

The USA is so far behind the rest of the world it scares me.  The lungs are the greediest of all of the organs in the body for stem cells.  ALI, COPD, etc have been treated around the world with adult stem cells for a long time now.  There was even a clinical trial in Dresden on 86 human patients   –

“Acute Lung Injury After Allogeneic Transplantation – Diagnosis and Early Treatment”

Enrollment: 86
Study Start Date: December 2001
Primary Completion Date: August 2005 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

…and the US is just barely putting a toe in the water with mouse studies? It’s time to CATCH UP!

-DG

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Lungs

Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury

ScienceDaily (Oct. 28, 2009) — Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can prevent acute lung injury in a mouse model of the disease.

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Their results are reported online in the October issue of the journal Stem Cells.

Acute lung injury (ALI) is responsible for an estimated 74,500 deaths in the U.S. each year. ALI can be caused by any major inflammation or injury to the lungs and is a major cause of death in patients in hospital ICUs. There is no effective drug treatment…

Except for adult stem cell treatments outside the US which you can find here – TREATMENT INFO NOW

via Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury.

BEAUTY OF SCIENCE – Adult Stem Cells

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on October 8, 2009 at 5:31 pm

Middle of the upper image: the product of the fusion of a multipotent, adult stem cell, marked by the expression of a green fluorescent protein, with a muscle cell (dyed red). Next to it are unfused stem and heart muscle cells. Bottom image: a combination of phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy shows the expression of the green stem cell markers in the nucleus of a hybrid heart muscle cell. Next to it are a number of unfused cells. (Image: Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research)

via Adult Stem Cells May Be Just Remnants Of Evolution.

Adult Stem Cells From Bone Marrow Made To Kill Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells In Mice

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on May 21, 2009 at 7:25 pm

Adult Stem Cells From Bone Marrow Made To Kill Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells In Mice

ScienceDaily (May 19, 2009) — Researchers in London have demonstrated the ability of adult stem cells from bone marrow (mesenchymal stem cells, or MSCs) to deliver a cancer-killing protein to tumors.

The genetically engineered stem cells are able to home to the cancer cells, both in culture and in mouse models, and deliver TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), destroying the tumor cells while sparing normal cells.

via Adult Stem Cells From Bone Marrow Made To Kill Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells In Mice.

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SUPER STEMMYS

are coming!!

Doris is a repair stem cell with some very special qualities.  Her will and persistence is vigorously challenged in her quests to overcome adversity and improve the health of a damaged heart.

Come join the adventure and discover the natural healing capabilities of the repair stem cells residing in all of us.  Don’t wait!  Dive right in to the exploits of SUPER STEMMYS!

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