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Posts Tagged ‘knee’

STEM CELL ‘LIVING BANDAGE’ FOR KNEE INJURIES

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 19, 2017 at 4:31 pm

Can we regrow a meniscus with stem cells?  Yes, of course.

  1. stem cells are harvested from the patient’s bone marrow
  2. cells are grown for 2 weeks
  3. cells are seeded onto a membrane scaffold
  4. the manufactured cell bandage is surgically implanted into the tear
  5. the cartilage is sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place

    All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation

Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans

December 16, 2016
Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans
Credit: University of Bristol

A ‘living bandage’ made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol.

Meniscal tears are suffered by over one million people a year in the US and Europe alone and are particularly common in contact sports like football and rugby. 90 per cent or more of tears occur in the white zone of meniscus which lacks a blood supply, making them difficult to repair. Many professional sports players opt to have the torn tissue removed altogether, risking osteoarthritis in later life.

The cell bandage has been developed by Bristol University spin-out company Azellon, and is designed to enable the meniscal tear to repair itself by encouraging cell growth in the affected tissue.

A prototype version of the cell bandage was trialled in five patients, aged between 18 and 45, with white-zone meniscal tears. The trial received funding support from Innovate UK and the promising results have been published today in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

The procedure involved taking , harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow, which were then grown for two weeks before being seeded onto a membrane scaffold that helps to deliver the cells into the injured site. The manufactured cell bandage was then surgically implanted into the middle of the tear and the cartilage was sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place.

All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation. By 24 months, three of the five patients retained an intact meniscus and had returned to normal knee functionality whilst the other two patients required surgical removal of the damaged meniscus due to a new tear or return of symptoms.

Professor Anthony Hollander, formerly of Bristol and now Chair of Stem Cell Biology at the University of Liverpool and Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Azellon, said: “The cell bandage trial results are very encouraging and offer a potential alternative to surgical removal that will repair the damaged tissue and restore full knee function.

“We are currently developing an enhanced version of the cell bandage using donor stem cells, which will reduce the cost of the procedure and remove the need for two operations.”

The cell bandage was produced by the Advanced Therapies Unit at the NHS Blood & Transplant facility in Speke, Liverpool and implanted into patients at Southmead Hospital in Bristol, under the supervision of Professor Ashley Blom, Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bristol.

Professor Blom, from Bristol’s School of Clinical Sciences, commented: “The cell bandage offers an exciting potential new treatment option for surgeons that could particularly benefit younger patients and athletes by reducing the likelihood of early onset osteoarthritis after meniscectomy.”

A spokesperson for Innovate UK said: “Turning into clinical and commercial reality requires close collaboration between businesses, universities, and Hospitals. It’s great to see this inter-disciplinary approach has led to such an exciting outcome from this first-in-human trial.”

Explore further: Pioneering stem cell bandage receives approval for clinical trial

More information: Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First-in-Human Study, , DOI: 10.1002/sctm.16-0199, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sctm.16-0199/abstract

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-12-stem-cell-bandage-knee-injuries.html#jCp

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Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on October 25, 2016 at 10:17 am

Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes

head, shoulders, knees and toes

Building on the revolutionary work of Dr Lima, who used nose stem cells to recover spinal cord injuries:

“Investigators took biopsy specimens that were 6 mm in diameter from the nasal septum, under local anaesthetic.

Then they grew the harvested cells in the lab for two weeks. The cartilage grafts were further prepared and then cut into the right shapes.

Finally, surgeons used the engineered grafts to replace damaged cartilage that was removed.

..Even though the level of repaired tissue appeared to vary among patients and over time, MRI scans at two years showed new tissue developed with similar properties to the original cartilage.

The nine recipients reported improvements in use of their knees and better pain scores compared to before their surgeries.

No side-effects were reported.”

Heads and Knees – Check!
Shoulders and Toes just around the corner.

Spinal Cord Injury and Stem Cells:
https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2011/02/07/spinal-cord-injury-and-repair-stem-cell-treatments/

Read more:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/knee-repair-nose-1.3814647

HEARTS and KNEES – Patient, heal thyself | sciencebuz

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 21, 2012 at 9:20 am

“The first study…uses stem cell therapy to repair heart tissue damaged by coronary heart disease. Of the 16 patients injected with autologous CSCs, 14 showed an increase in Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF)…In seven of the patients, infarct (dead tissue) size decreased by 24 % at the end of 4 months, and a further 6 % at the end of a year. Both these results indicate CSCs had a positive impact on heart tissue regeneration.

The second study…focuses on using autologous stem cell therapy for repair of torn meniscal tissue…The “Cell Bandage” from Azellon will use patients own, expanded stem cells, harvested from the bone marrow…will grow into new menisci-type cells and heal the tear. The results of in vitro trials have so far been very promising. Phase I clinical trials are set to begin May 2012.”

https://i1.wp.com/www.designmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/5417124292_6a49ef3983.jpg

Two reports in the press this week focus on the use of autologous (patient’s own) stem cells for repair of damaged tissue.

The first study, led by Professor Roberto Bolli, of the University of Louisville, reports on early findings of a phase I clinical trial, which uses stem cell therapy to repair heart tissue damaged by coronary heart disease. Cardiac tissue, harvested from the patient during surgery, was used to  isolate autologous cardiac stem cells (CSCs). CSCs were grown in the laboratory till their numbers reached around 2 million cells. At this stage the cells were re-injected back at the site of tissue damage.

Of the 16 patients injected with autologous CSCs, 14 showed an increase in Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) – the amount of blood a left ventricle pumps through the aorta during each contraction of the heart, 4 months after infusion. In seven of the patients, infarct (dead tissue) size decreased by 24 % at the end of 4 months, and a further 6 % at the end of a year. Both these results indicate CSCs had a positive impact on heart tissue regeneration.

The second study, led by Professor Anthony Hollander, of Azellon Ltd, a University of Bristol spin-out company, focuses on using autologous stem cell therapy for repair of torn meniscal tissue. The menisci are found at the knee joints, and they act as shock absorbers for the knee. This tissue is often damaged as a result of sport-related injury, especially contact sports such as football or rugby.

Current treatment options include knee arthroscopy surgery, which involves removing part or whole of the damaged meniscal tissue. This reduces the shock-absorbing properties at the knee joint and leaves the patient vulnerable to early-onset osteoarthritis, eventually followed by total knee replacement.

The “Cell Bandage” from Azellon will use patients own, expanded stem cells, harvested from the bone marrow. These cells are seeded onto a special biocompatible membrane, which will be inserted at the site of damage using a simple surgical procedure.  Given the right conditions, the hope is that stem cells will grow into new menisci-type cells and heal the tear. The results of in vitro trials have so far been very promising. Phase I clinical trials are set to begin May 2012.

Patient, heal thyself | sciencebuz.

TERRELL OWENS GETS STEM CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES on September 20, 2011 at 9:58 am

THE DAM IS BREAKING AND STEM CELLS ARE POURING IN…

OR RATHER, OUR ELITE ATHLETES ARE POURING OUT OF THE USA TO GET STEM CELLS!!

FOLLOWING THE PATHS OF BARTOLO COLON AND PEYTON MANNING, 37 YEAR OLD TERRELL OWENS GOES FOR STEM CELL TREATMENT ON HIS ACL IN A BID TO REJUVENATE HIS KNEE AND RETURN TO THE NFL.

NFL.com Staff

Published: September 20th, 2011 | Tags:

NFL WIDE RECEIVER Terrell Owens, refusing to abandon his attempted return to the NFL, has traveled to Asia for treatment on the anterior cruciate ligament he tore up during the offseason.

“Mr. Owens starts with therapy Monday, followed by the collecting and storing of his stem cells the next day”

Owens becomes the second big-name player to travel abroad for stem cell-related therapy after Peyton Manning went to Europe for a stem-cell procedure before his most recent neck surgery.

– Marc Sessler

Natural Health Care: Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

In ALL ARTICLES on July 13, 2010 at 12:59 pm

This article is interesting because the UK has been typically focused on embryonic stem cell research.  They are now accepting the benefits of safety of adult stem cells and putting their research time and money into it.  Perhaps the US should follow suit so they are not the last kid on the block to get their “big wheel” or “x-box?” – dg

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

BBC news A stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis is to be tested on patients in the UK for the first time.

A year-long trial, funded by Arthritis Research UK, will mix stem cells with cartilage cells in the lab and inject them back into damaged knee joints.

Bone marrow stem cell
Stem cell therapy is a less invasive treatment than joint replacement

The new treatment could be an alternative to joint replacement surgery, experts hope.  Scientists from Keele University will study up to 70 people from the end of this year.  The trial will be run at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital in Oswestry, Shropshire as part of a five-year research programme.  Three treatments are being tested in a randomised trial of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cell therapy

Using keyhole surgery, a patient’s cartilage cells – also known as chondrocytes – and bone marrow stem cells will be removed and grown in a laboratory for three weeks.  We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term.

Professor Sally Roberts, Keele University

They will then be re-implanted separately in some patients, and mixed together in other patients, into the area of damaged or worn cartilage.  Scientists will then test the effectiveness of all three types of cell therapy, based on the quality of the new cartilage formed over a period of 12 months.  Chondrocytes – cartilage cells – have been grown in a lab and re-injected into patients’ damaged knees for the last 15 years.  But scientists now want to find out if combining cartilage cells and stem cells in the same process could work better, and specifically if one type of cell stimulates the other.

Less invasive

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 8m people in the UK.  The condition is caused by wear and tear to the surface of joints, leading to stiffness and pain.  At present there is little effective treatment for osteoarthritis patients, apart from pain-relieving drugs and joint replacement.  The trial will focus on knee joints, but the results could have implications for other joints, say the scientists.  The advantage of stem cell treatment is that it’s much less invasive than major joint replacement surgery.  Sally Roberts, professor of orthopaedic research at Keele University and lead scientist on the trial, says it’s also a more “biological approach”.

“We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints.

The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term repair,” she said.

via Natural Health Care: Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

BBC news A stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis is to be tested on patients in the UK for the first time.A year-long trial, funded by Arthritis Research UK, will mix stem cells with cartilage cells in the lab and inject them back into damaged knee joints.

Bone marrow stem cell
Stem cell therapy is a less invasive treatment than joint replacement
The new treatment could be an alternative to joint replacement surgery, experts hope.

Scientists from Keele University will study up to 70 people from the end of this year.

The trial will be run at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital in Oswestry, Shropshire as part of a five-year research programme.

Three treatments are being tested in a randomised trial of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cell therapyUsing keyhole surgery, a patient’s cartilage cells – also known as chondrocytes – and bone marrow stem cells will be removed and grown in a laboratory for three weeks.

We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term

Professor Sally Roberts, Keele University

They will then be re-implanted separately in some patients, and mixed together in other patients, into the area of damaged or worn cartilage.

Scientists will then test the effectiveness of all three types of cell therapy, based on the quality of the new cartilage formed over a period of 12 months.

Chondrocytes – cartilage cells – have been grown in a lab and re-injected into patients’ damaged knees for the last 15 years.

But scientists now want to find out if combining cartilage cells and stem cells in the same process could work better, and specifically if one type of cell stimulates the other.

Less invasive

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 8m people in the UK.

The condition is caused by wear and tear to the surface of joints, leading to stiffness and pain.

At present there is little effective treatment for osteoarthritis patients, apart from pain-relieving drugs and joint replacement.

The trial will focus on knee joints, but the results could have implications for other joints, say the scientists.

The advantage of stem cell treatment is that it’s much less invasive than major joint replacement surgery.

Sally Roberts, professor of orthopaedic research at Keele University and lead scientist on the trial, says it’s also a more “biological approach”.

“We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term repair,” she said.

Adult Stem Cell Technique May Help Injury – The Philadelphia Bulletin

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 30, 2009 at 1:56 pm

knee-and-stem-cells-meniscusAdult Stem Cell Technique May Help Knee/Meniscus Injury

By Susan Brinkmann, For The Bulletin

Monday, March 30, 2009

The same Scottish research team that successfully grew human cartilage from a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells in 2005 is now ready to test a new technique that can “knit” together torn knee cartilage — a common injury among young people who play sports…suffering from injuries to the part of the knee cartilage known as the meniscus.

“At the moment, there’s no way to treat this [cartilage],” Mr. Hollander told The Scotsman. “It is just cut out, and that leaves the patient very susceptible to osteoarthritis within a short number of years.”

The problem…common in young athletes, is that it involves a tear in what is called the “white zone” on the knee where there is no blood supply. Doctors can suture together the tear and relieve the pain for a short time, but when the sutures fall out, the pain returns.

Because these tears essentially do not heal, surgeons generally perform a partial meniscectomy to remove the damaged part of the meniscus. In at least 50 percent of these cases, patients go on to develop premature osteoarthritis in the damaged knee — often at an age when they are too young to have joint replacement.

This is a significant problem for which there is currently no other treatment.

In 2005, Mr. Hollander and his team successfully grew human cartilage from a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells and have been working on a way to implant the engineered cartilage into the knee so that it will integrate with surrounding tissue. They discovered that by using a special material that can be “seeded” on both sides with stem cells, the “cell bandage” can be implanted into the middle of the lesion and sewn closed. The cells then begin to migrate out of the bandage and into the surrounding tissue.

“It is designed in a way that the cells will migrate across the lesion and literally knit it together. So, instead of growing new tissue, it’s healing the lesion itself,” Mr. Hollander said.

The procedure also eliminates the need to cut out damaged tissue.

via Adult Stem Cell Technique May Help Injury – The Philadelphia Bulletin.

Bristol University | News from the University | A stem cell bandage for your knee

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 1:08 pm

A stem cell bandage for your knee

knee-and-stem-cells

knee-and-adult-stem-cell-"bandage"

17 February 2009

Back in December 2003, re:search reported on the work being done by Anthony Hollander, Professor of Rheumatology and Tissue Engineering in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, who was pioneering regenerative medicine techniques in order to replace cartilage in the knees of osteoarthritis sufferers. Five years later, re:search reviews the remarkable developments that have occurred in that time.

Building on his previous work, Hollander and his team, which included Dr Wael Kafienah and Dr John Tarlton, announced in 2005 they had, for the first time ever, successfully grown human cartilage from a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells. It took just over a month to grow the cells into a half-inch length of cartilage and tests showed that the laboratory-grown cartilage was of a higher quality than any previous attempts at tissue engineering. Now the challenge was how to implant the engineered cartilage into the knee and get it to integrate with the surrounding tissue. The idea was to use cells to drive integration of one tissue with another, with the long-term aim of developing a way of fixing and integrating engineered cartilage with natural cartilage, literally ‘knitting’ the two surfaces together with cells.

via Bristol University | News from the University | A stem cell bandage for your knee.

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