DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘intestin’

INTESTINAL STEM CELLS RESPOND TO FOOD BY SUPERSIZING THE GUT

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on October 27, 2011 at 6:24 pm

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INTESTINAL STEM CELLS RESPOND TO FOOD BY SUPERSIZING THE GUT

SO now we know that stem cells change your body all the time to deal with changes in your environment and what you eat.  Is it getting clearer? – David

Intestinal stem cells respond to food by supersizing the gut

BERKELEY —

A new study from University of California, Berkeley, researchers demonstrates that adult stem cells can reshape our organs in response to changes in the body and the environment, a finding that could have implications for diabetes and obesity…

Intestinal stem cells respond to food by supersizing the gut.

DIABETES CLINICAL TRIALS

  • FIRST USE OF CORD BLOOD TO ALTER COURSE OF TYPE 1 DIABETES, June 25, 2007 – (I’ll bet nobody heard of this one!)transfusion of stored, autologous (i.e. the person’s own), umbilical cord blood into a group of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes appears to have reduced their disease severity, possibly re-setting the immune system and slowing the destruction of their insulin-producing cells, according to a report presented today at the American Diabetes Association’s 67th Annual Scientific Sessions. –http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/media/m_pdf/ADA_T1D_PR-06-25-07.pdf(The ADA in 2007 knew stem cells can treat Diabetes type 1 in children!)
  • Diabetes type 1 stem cell clinical trial – Enrollment 11/2003-4/2008, follow-up until December 2008 – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/14/type-1-diabetes-stem-cells-clinical-trial/
  • Why no diabetes clinical trial s in the US when mice were cured of diabetes type 1 in the 1990’s? –  Weissman, a professor of pathology and developmental biology at Stanford University, states: “Stem cells are rare, self-renewing, and can regenerate body tissues.” He repeatedly expressed frustration that while many of his discoveries seemed to hold remarkable potential for life-saving treatments, commercial or regulatory hurdles have prevented his scientific research from benefiting human beings. One example is, his mid-’90s research on type I diabetes, in which he demonstrated the ability to fully cure type I diabetes in mice using stem cells. Even though the experiments avoided political controversy by using adult/repair stem cells, which do not come from embryos, Weissman ran into a road block when pharmaceutical companies refused to sponsor clinical trials. The therapy went nowhere. “The pharmaceutical companies had put profit over principle, preferring to keep diabetes sufferers dependent on costly insulin than to cure them once and for all.” – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/13/research-from-90s-cures-type-1-diabetes/

If you or a loved one is interested in receiving FREE information on currently available stem cell treatments for DIABETES or PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE, please contact me at dsgrano@gmail.com or for other options, go to: CONTACT ME

The making of an intestinal stem cell

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on March 6, 2009 at 4:09 pm
intestinal-stem-cell

intestinal-stem-cell

Science Centric | 6 March 2009 15:44 GMT

Researchers have found the factor that makes the difference between a stem cell in the intestine and any other cell. The discovery reported in the 6th March issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, is an essential step toward understanding the biology of the stem cells, which are responsible for replenishing all other cells in the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in mammals. It may also have implications for colon cancer, according to the researchers.

The report finds evidence that a transcription factor called Achaete scute-like 2 (Ascl2) switches on the stem cell program in intestinal cells. Transcription factors are genes that control other genes.

‘This transcription factor makes these stem cells tick,’ said Hans Clevers of Hubrecht Institute-KNAW and University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. ‘It activates a small program of genes essential to gut stem cells.’ In other words, if the Ascl2 gene turns on, any dividing cell in the intestine would turn into a stem cell capable of producing any other cell type in that tissue, he added.

The lining of the intestine is made up of peaks known as villi and valleys called crypts. The crypts contain stem cells and so-called Paneth cells, which serve to protect those stem cells.

Intestinal stem cells are rather unique among adult stem cells, Clevers said. In most tissues of the body, stem cells divide only rarely – perhaps once a month. That’s not true of the rapidly dividing stem cells of the intestine.

‘Their entire life, intestinal stem cells make tissue every day,’ he said. That’s because approximately every five days, the intestinal lining is replaced in its entirety, leaving only the stem cells and their Paneth cell defenders constant. The stem cells produce an impressive 200 to 300 grams of new cells every day, Clevers added…

via Science Centric | News | The making of an intestinal stem cell.

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