DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘improve’

STEM CELLS FOR MS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 17, 2011 at 9:42 am

MORE CONFIRMATION IT WORKS!

Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2011;111(2 Suppl 2):72-6.

[Transplantation of mesenchymal

stem cells in multiple sclerosis].

Abstract

To assess safety and tolerability of treatment with autologic multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in multiple sclerosis (MS), we have obtained autologic red bone marrow-derived MSC from 8 patients. Proliferation, immunophenotype and caryotype of MSC, their sterility, the absence of hemopoetic cells, chromosomal aberrations and signs of aging were controlled during the cell growth. The inverse injection of MSC in patient’s blood was conducted in accordance to the elaborated protocol in a short intravenous infusion in dose 2.0 x 10(6)/kg of body mass once in 30 days.

  • The duration of treatment was from 4 to 8 months.
  • The efficacy of treatment was assessed after 4, 8 and 12 months.
  • All patients tolerated repeated intravenous infusions of autologic MSC well with no significant side-effects as in the early as well in the remote periods of treatment.
  • The distinct positive effect was seen in some cases 2 months after the beginning of treatment.
  • The improvement of 0.5 point on EDSS was seen in 5/8 patients after 4 months.
  • After 12 months, the improvement of 0.5-1 point on EDSS was seen in 6/8, stabilization in 1/8, progression in 1/8.
  • These results revealed the safety of the elaborated protocol of treatment and the moderate clinical efficacy of treatment in non-curable patients or those with poor response to treatment that suggested continuing the study and enrollment of new patients.
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Stem cell therapy wasn’t unfair help for baseball star – health – 08 June 2011 – New Scientist

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 8, 2011 at 10:55 pm

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BARTOLO COLÓN, a pitcher for the New York Yankees, is at the centre of a Major League Baseball (MLB) investigation after he opted for stem cell therapy to treat an elbow and shoulder injury.

MLB wants to know whether such stem cell treatment qualifies as a performance-enhancing drug. If Colón’s procedure included a dose of human growth hormone – which is banned in baseball – then MLB might have a case. But a New Scientist investigation suggests that the treatment was probably restorative, and does not endow people with “superhuman” powers.

Colón’s professional baseball career began impressively. In 2005 he won the American League Cy Young award for best pitcher. However, that season he partially tore the rotator cuff in his pitching arm, a group of muscles and tendons that stabilise the shoulder. In the years following the injury, Colón’s rise faltered. He was sidelined in the final two months of the 2009 season and didn’t play at all in 2010. However, after impressive pitching in the 2010 off-season, the Yankees signed the 38-year-old in January this year on a $900,000 contract. Colón is now back in action, pitching at 150 kilometres per hour in MLB games.

What changed? It seems that Colón has grown a new tendon thanks to stem cell therapy…

Stem cell therapy wasn’t unfair help for baseball star – health – 08 June 2011 – New Scientist.

Gene therapy shows promise for Parkinson’s | Reuters

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 17, 2011 at 11:02 am

I’m glad to see other therapies are producing benefits to Parkinson’s patients.

There now seems to be 3 options for Parkinson’s patients:
Gene therapy = 23.1 % improvement
Placebo effect = 12.7 % improvement

Adult Stem Cells = 60 % improvement*

* 60% PARKINSON’S PATIENTS IMPROVE AFTER REPAIR STEM CELL TREATMENT – PHYSICIANS CONFIRM RESULTS! https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/02/06/60-parkinsons-patients-improve-after-repair-stem-cell-treatment-physicians-confirm-results/

-dg

Gene therapy article below pic


“The treated group showed a 23.1 percent improvement on a scale of Parkinson’s symptoms six months after treatment, compared to a 12.7 percent improvement for patients who received sham surgery, according to the published research.”

Gene therapy shows promise for Parkinson’s | Reuters.

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

In ALL ARTICLES on February 18, 2011 at 10:13 am

“Transplanting autologous renal progenitor cells (RPCs), (kidney stem cells derived from self-donors), into rat models with kidney damage from pyelonephritis – a type of urinary infection that has reached the kidney – has been found to improve kidney structure and function.”

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

https://i0.wp.com/galileo.phys.virginia.edu/classes/304/kidney.gif

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 14, 2011) – Transplanting autologous renal progenitor cells (RPCs), (kidney stem cells derived from self-donors), into rat models with kidney damage from pyelonephritis – a type of urinary infection that has reached the kidney – has been found to improve kidney structure and function.

The study, authored by a research team from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, is published in the current issue of Cell Medicine [1(3)] and is freely available on-line at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/cm .

“Advancements in stem cell therapies and tissue engineering hold great promise for regenerative nephrology,” said Dr. Abdol-Mohammad Kajbafzadeh, corresponding author. “Our RPC transplant study demonstrated benefits for pyelonephritis, a disease characterized by severe inflammation, renal function impairment and eventual scarring, and which remains a major cause of end-stage-renal disease worldwide.”

The researchers divided 27 rats into three groups, two of which were modeled with an induced pyelonephritis in their right kidneys, while the third group did not have induced disease. RPCs were obtained from the diseased animals’ left kidneys and injected into the right kidney six weeks later. Two weeks after injection, tubular atrophy was reduced. After four weeks, fibrosis was reduced and after sixty days, right renal tissue integrity was “significantly improved.”

“We propose that kidney augmentation was mainly due to functional tissue regeneration following cellular transplantation,” said Dr. Kajbafzadeh. “Kidney-specific stem/progenitor cells might be the most appropriate candidates for transplantation because of their inherent organ-specific differentiation and their capacity to modulate tissue remodeling in chronic nephropathies.”

The researchers concluded that because renal fibrosis is a common and ultimate pathway leading to end-stage renal disease, amelioration of fibrosis might be of major clinical relevance.

“Transplanting RPCs showed the potential for partial augmentation of kidney structure and function in pyelonephritis,” said Dr. Kajbafzadeh. “This is one of the first studies to demonstrate improved renal function after cell transplantation. The translation of this study into larger clinical models will be very relevant to validate the success of this small animal study.” said Dr. Amit Patel, Section Editor Cell Medicine, Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Utah.

###

Citation. Kajbafzadeh, A-M.; Elmi, A.; Talab, S. S.; Sadeghi, Z.; Emami, H.; Sotoudeh, M. Autografting of Renal Progenitor Cells Ameliorates Kidney Damage in Experimental Model of Pyelonephritis. Cell Med. 1(3): 115-122; 2010.

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

Heart study finds long-term value in stem cell treatments – FierceBiotech Research

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 22, 2010 at 8:17 pm

Heart study finds long-term value in stem cell treatments

August 31, 2010 — 8:10am ET | By John Carroll

Related Stories

* Adult stem cells key to ventricle transplants

* Osiris reports major gains in stem cell trial

* Heart researchers hunt for drugs that rein in mystery protein

* Researchers combat aging as a “stem cell disease”

* iPSC use may be limited by ‘memory’

* Artificial artery readied for human trials

* Stem cell patch developed to repair damaged hearts

* Cell discovery opens new door to heart researchers

* Revolutionary stem cell trials planned in the UK

* Researchers testing stem cell therapy for CHF

German scientists have posted some of the most convincing long-term data yet seen demonstrating that injections of a chronic heart failure patient’s own bone marrow stem cells can significantly improve heart function and raise their chances of survival.

The researchers recruited close to 400 subjects for the trial, nearly evenly dividing them between a group that received stem cell injections and another group which opted to go without the added therapy. Researchers said they could begin tracking a positive response after three months and found that after five years only seven of the stem cell treatment group had died compared to 32 in the control arm of the study. All of the patients were provided standard therapy for their condition.

“Our study suggests that, when administered as an alternative or in addition to conventional therapy, bone marrow cell therapy can improve quality of life, increase ventricular performance and increase survival,” said lead researcher Bodo-Eckehard Strauer of Duesseldorf’s Heinrich Heine University. And Strauer went on to tell a gathering in Stockholm that the therapy presents no risks and “can only be beneficial.”

Not everyone who has reviewed the data, though, is so certain. “God gave us two gifts for doing clinical research–blinding and randomization,” Rob Califf, vice chancellor for research at Duke University, told MedPage Today. “If you have done neither, your data are interesting but not definitive.”

via Heart study finds long-term value in stem cell treatments – FierceBiotech Research.

Minnesota cancer researchers net $26M for stem cell therapies « MedCity News

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 21, 2010 at 8:22 pm

Minnesota cancer researchers net $26M for stem cell therapies

Two researchers at the University of Minnesota‘s Masonic Cancer Center will receive $26 million in renewed grants from the National Cancer Institute to boost stem cell therapies that treat blood and bone cancers, as well as other disorders.

Dr. Philip McGlave and Dr. Jeffrey Miller want to increase the availability, safety and effectiveness of hematopoietic stem cell transplants and cell therapies to improve treatment and survival for thousand of patients diagnosed each year with leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and other blood and bone marrow disorders.

McGlave and his research team will get $12.6 million to improve stem cell transplant and cell-based treatments. McGlave is deputy director of the Masonic Cancer Center and director of the University Medical School’s Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation.

Miller will get about $13.3 million to continue his team’s research on characterizing “natural killer cells” or “NK cells” to reduce the rate of relapse of leukemia after stem cell transplants. He is associate director of the Masonic Cancer Center’s Experimental Therapeutics Program and professor of medicine focusing on hematology, oncology and transplantation.

via Minnesota cancer researchers net $26M for stem cell therapies « MedCity News.

Autologous Neural Stem Cells Benefit Parkinson’s Patients – AdultStemCell.com

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 21, 2010 at 8:21 pm

Autologous Neural Stem Cells Benefit Parkinson’s Patients

Stem cells and stem cell research have long been studied to help provide relief of symptoms and potential cures for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

The use of adult stem cell therapy has grown in popularity, surpassing even traditional embryonic stem cell research methodology is. Autologous stem cells are those harvested from individual patients suffering from a disease process such as Parkinson’s, which do not carry with them the risk of rejection, as do organs or cells transplanted from other individuals into that patient.

Stem Cell Treatment Studies

Adult stem cells are known as undifferentiated or multipotent cells capable of producing different blood cells. That means that they haven’t specifically developed or grown into a specific type of tissue or organ. Adult stem cells can renew themselves and grow into become just about any type of specialized cell, tissue or organ tissue.

Neural stem cells are multipotent cells that self-renew or self generate. Neural stem cells that may be generated from a patient’s own bone marrow or nerve tissues may be used to treat a variety of traumatic brain injuries, damage caused by strokes, or neuro-genetic disease processes such as those commonly found in Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease patients.

Neural stem cells may be harvested from the bone marrow as well as various areas of the brain and central nervous system. Recent studies, including those described in The Open Stem Cell Journal 1, 20-29, February 2009 stated that autologous adult stem cells were able to relieve Parkinson’s patient symptoms for almost five years.

Stem cells 24, 781-792, March 2006, reported that the use of stem cells derived from umbilical cord stem cells and used to treat rats with Parkinson’s determined “significant recovery in motion and behavior”.

In Japan, researchers from Kyoto University successfully treated mice with Parkinson’s disease by transplanting “nerve cells developed from their own bone marrow stromal cells.” Journal Of Clinical Investigation 113: 1701-1710, 2004

Research and technology regarding the use of autologous neural stem cells to treat symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, improve mobility and quality of life for patients continue around the world. Individuals from the United States, as well as Parkinson’s patients from around the world, increasingly travel to destinations such as Mexico, the Ukraine, South Korea, Asia, and South America for promising stem cell treatments.

via Autologous Neural Stem Cells Benefit Parkinson’s Patients – AdultStemCell.com.

STROKE articles:

  1. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/autologous-neural-stem-cells-benefit-parkinson%e2%80%99s-patients-adultstemcell-com/
  2. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/stem-cell-treatment-for-stroke-and-traumatic-brain-injury-wholewellness-net/
  3. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-stem-cells-block-stroke-damage
  4. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110831160216.htm

Stem Cell Treatment for Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury | WholeWellness.net

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 20, 2010 at 8:17 pm

Stem Cell Treatment for Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury

September 20, 2010, By admin

Damage and Disability caused by Stroke

At present, ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialised countries. With an annual incidence of 250–400 in 100 000 inhabitants, around 1 million people suffer from a stroke each year in the United States and in the European Union(1). Approximately a third of cases are left with some form of permanent impairment, making stroke the single largest cause of severe disability in the developed world.

Stroke is caused by the interruption of blood flow in a brain-supplying artery; commonly an embolus causes an occlusion (blockage) in the blood vessel. Ischemic stroke (cerebral infarction) and the even more devastating intracerebral haemorrhage, cause a disturbance of neuronal circuitry and disruption of the blood-brain-barrier that can lead to functional disabilities. At this time, therapy is primarily based on the prevention of recurrent (secondary) strokes. Rehabilitation therapy is important for maximizing functional recovery in the early phase after stroke, but once recovery has plateaued there is no known treatment.

Stem cell treatment could be the major breakthrough in effecting repair of some of the damage caused by stroke.

via Stem Cell Treatment for Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury | WholeWellness.net.

Other STROKE articles:

  1. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/autologous-neural-stem-cells-benefit-parkinson%e2%80%99s-patients-adultstemcell-com/
  2. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/stem-cell-treatment-for-stroke-and-traumatic-brain-injury-wholewellness-net/
  3. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-stem-cells-block-stroke-damage
  4. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110831160216.htm

Stem Cell Treatment for Burn Patients Earns Alpert Prize | Focus

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on September 3, 2010 at 8:17 pm

Stem Cell Treatment for Burn Patients Earns Alpert Prize

September 3, 2010

Howard Green

Howard Green, a founding father of regenerative medicine and the George Higginson professor of cell biology at HMS, will receive the 2010 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize on Sept. 27. Colleagues will honor Green at an afternoon symposium featuring talks by prominent stem cell researchers.

The Warren Alpert Foundation Prize, which confers an award of $200,000, recognizes researchers for laboratory discoveries that have been translated into patient therapies or for findings with real potential to improve human health. Green’s work embodies the spirit of the prize: he developed the first therapeutic use of cells grown in the lab. Before stem cells gained prominence, Green cultivated them to generate skin grafts for burn patients. As an Alpert Prize recipient, Green joins an elite international group of researchers, seven of whom have also won a Nobel Prize.

“Right now there are but a handful of proven stem cell therapies, and two of the major ones are directly derived from the pioneering work of Howard Green,” said Elaine Fuchs, a well-known skin stem cell biologist and the Rebecca Lancefield professor at Rockefeller University. Fuchs, who is also a Howard Hughes investigator and the current president of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, completed her postdoctoral work in Green’s lab.

via Stem Cell Treatment for Burn Patients Earns Alpert Prize | Focus.

Stem Cells May Help Treat Heart Failure

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on August 30, 2010 at 8:17 pm

Stem Cells May Help Treat Heart Failure

Study Shows Injection of Bone-Marrow Stem Cells May Extend Lives of Heart Failure Patients

By Charlene Laino

WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Aug. 30, 2010 (Stockholm, Sweden) — Giving people with chronic heart failure injections of their own bone-marrow stem cells appears to improve their heart function and extend their lives, new research suggests.

The benefits of the stem cell treatment were apparent within three months and persisted for the five years the patients were followed, says researcher Bodo-Eckehard Strauer, MD, of Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf, Germany.

This isn’t the first time doctors have reported that stem cells may help improve the health of people with heart failure or other heart conditions.

But the 391-patient study is one of the biggest tests to date of stem cell therapy for heart disease — and the first to show that the treatment cuts the risk of death in chronic heart failure, Strauer tells WebMD.

The treatment “has almost no risks and is effective when used on top of other treatments for chronic heart failure,” he says.

The findings were reported here at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Stem Cells and Scarred Heart Tissue

One major cause of heart failure occurs when the heart muscle becomes scarred and loses its ability to pump enough blood throughout the body, often after a massive heart attack.

“The hope is that by injecting stem cells into the scarred area, you will bring life back to that area and induce healthy muscle,” says American Heart Association spokeswoman Mariell Jessup, MD, medical director of the Penn Heart and Vascular Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Stem cells are at an early stage of maturation and therefore have the potential to become many different types of cells, including those in the heart muscle.

Treatment With Stem Cells

In the study, bone marrow stem cells were taken from the area at the top of the patient’s pelvic bone. Then they were processed in the lab in such a way as to allow them to be injected into the scarred heart muscle.

Nearly five years after the study started, seven of the 191 patients who had the stem cell treatment had died vs. 32 of 200 patients who did not have the treatment — a substantial difference.

The stem cell treatment improved the heart’s ability to pump blood and restored blood flow to oxygen-starved heart muscle. Patients were able to exercise more. They also reported improved quality of life, Strauer says.

No patient experienced side effects, he says. All patients continued to receive optimal medical treatment throughout the study.

“There’s been ongoing excitement about using stem cells to treat heart disease for some time and this study certainly adds to it,” Jessup tells WebMD.

But the therapy is not ready for prime time, she says. One of the reasons: In the study, people knew whether they were getting the stem cell treatment, she says.

“It’s not like the traditional randomized, controlled trial where people don’t know whether they are getting the experimental treatment. That’s what we really need,” Jessup says.

Also, there may be “some increase in potentially life-threatening [irregular heartbeats]. You can’t discount that and say there are no risks,” she says.

This study was presented at a medical conference. The findings should be considered preliminary as they have not yet undergone the “peer review” process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.

via Stem Cells May Help Treat Heart Failure.

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