DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘exercise’

20 MINUTES EXERCISE = INFLAMMATION REDUX

In DISEASE INFO, HEALTH AND WELLNESS on January 23, 2017 at 11:17 am

Does exercise increase or reduce inflammation?  One look at Arnold Schwarzenegger’s  incredibly pumped physique and you might think exercise increases inflammation…but this is a different KIND of inflammation.
Scientists have found that just
one session of moderate exercise can stimulate the immune system, producing an anti-inflammatory cellular response.  “The findings have encouraging implications for chronic diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia and for more pervasive conditions, such as obesity.”
schwarzenegger

Exercise … It does a body good: 20 minutes can act as anti-inflammatory

One moderate exercise session has a cellular response that may help suppress inflammation in the body

Date:January 12, 2017 – Source: University of California – San Diego
Summary:
It’s well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers have found how just one session of moderate exercise can also act as an anti-inflammatory. The findings have encouraging implications for chronic diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia and for more pervasive conditions, such as obesity.

It’s well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found how just one session of moderate exercise can also act as an anti-inflammatory. The findings have encouraging implications for chronic diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia and for more pervasive conditions, such as obesity.

The study, recently published online in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, found one 20-minute session of moderate exercise can stimulate the immune system, producing an anti-inflammatory cellular response.

“Each time we exercise, we are truly doing something good for our body on many levels, including at the immune cell level,” said senior author Suzi Hong, PhD, in the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “The anti-inflammatory benefits of exercise have been known to researchers, but finding out how that process happens is the key to safely maximizing those benefits.”

The brain and sympathetic nervous system — a pathway that serves to accelerate heart rate and raise blood pressure, among other things — are activated during exercise to enable the body to carry out work. Hormones, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine, are released into the blood stream and trigger adrenergic receptors, which immune cells possess.

This activation process during exercise produces immunological responses, which include the production of many cytokines, or proteins, one of which is TNF — a key regulator of local and systemic inflammation that also helps boost immune responses.

exercise

“Our study found one session of about 20 minutes of moderate treadmill exercise resulted in a five percent decrease in the number of stimulated immune cells producing TNF,” said Hong. “Knowing what sets regulatory mechanisms of inflammatory proteins in motion may contribute to developing new therapies for the overwhelming number of individuals with chronic inflammatory conditions, including nearly 25 million Americans who suffer from autoimmune diseases.”

The 47 study participants walked on a treadmill at an intensity level that was adjusted based on their fitness level. Blood was collected before and immediately after the 20 minute exercise challenge.

“Our study shows a workout session doesn’t actually have to be intense to have anti-inflammatory effects. Twenty minutes to half-an-hour of moderate exercise, including fast walking, appears to be sufficient,” said Hong. “Feeling like a workout needs to be at a peak exertion level for a long duration can intimidate those who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases and could greatly benefit from physical activity.”

Inflammation is a vital part of the body’s immune response. It is the body’s attempt to heal itself after an injury; defend itself against foreign invaders, such as viruses and bacteria; and repair damaged tissue. However, chronic inflammation can lead to serious health issues associated with diabetes, celiac disease, obesity and other conditions.

“Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases should always consult with their physician regarding the appropriate treatment plan, but knowing that exercise can act as an anti-inflammatory is an exciting step forward in possibilities,” said Hong.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of California – San Diego. Original written by MIchelle Brubaker. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Stoyan Dimitrov, Elaine Hulteng, Suzi Hong. Inflammation and exercise: Inhibition of monocytic intracellular TNF production by acute exercise via β2-adrenergic activation. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 2016; DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.12.017
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FOR BEST RESULTS: INCREASE GUT BACTERIA

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on June 23, 2014 at 4:04 pm

http://clearlykombucha.com/2014/03/wtf-are-probiotics/

 For Best Results: Increase Gut Bacteria

 

“A healthy and balanced diet, as well as probiotics, have been known to be helpful in preserving gastrointestinal health for quite a long time. But it is only recently that the underlying mechanisms have become somewhat clearer. A rapidly increasing body of knowledge promises to further clarify the effects of our daily food on the gut microbiota and to indicate more targeted applications of probiotics in the near future. This was one of the topics presented at the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Miami, FL, USA. On March 8-9, 2014, internationally leading experts discussed the latest advances in gut microbiota research and its impact on health.”  –‘Feeding gut microbiota: Nutrition, probiotics key factors for digestive health.’ ScienceDaily

We’ve all heard of probiotics and their dietary benefits. Now let’s use that knowledge and put it to good use when it comes to stem cell transplantation. According to the article we posted earlier, increased gut microbiota can increase the success and survival rate of patients post transplant. Now here’s the big question… ‘how do we increase these helpful suckers early and get them working ASAP?!’ Well, you probably guessed it–  eating foods rich in probiotics (such as yogurt)  is one way to do this! Click the links and find out why you should be feeding the little helpers alive in your gut and how to increase their diversity– and increase your chances of success!!

http://helivac.co.za/2014/04/25/probiotics-and-your-gut/

Other benefits of increased gut microbiota and why that’s good

Related Links:

Exercise and healthy diet and how that helps

What are probiotics anyway?

 

REUTERS UPDATE

In ALL ARTICLES on January 4, 2012 at 12:09 pm
UK wants results of breast implant review this week
LONDON (Reuters) – Britain expects the results of a review of breast implant safety to come this week following a global health scare focused on products from a now defunct French company, Health Secretary Andrew Lansley said on Wednesday. | Full Article
Want your kids to do better in school? Try exercise
January 04, 2012 08:17 AM ET
(Reuters) – Children who get more exercise also tend to do better in school, whether the exercise comes as recess, physical education classes or getting exercise on the way to school, according to an international study. | Full Article
Daycare providers say kids are too inactive
January 04, 2012 09:22 AM ET
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Potential playground hazards, a focus on classroom learning and boring play equipment have children spending too little time being physically active at daycare, according to a survey of staff members at child care centers in Ohio. | Full Article

Exercise Associated With Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

In ALL ARTICLES on October 8, 2009 at 2:33 pm

Recent, Vigorous Exercise Is Associated With Reduced Breast Cancer Risk

ScienceDaily (Oct. 1, 2009) — Post-menopausal women who engage in moderate to vigorous exercise have a reduced risk of breast cancer. This comes from researchers writing the open access journal BMC Cancer who investigated the link between breast cancer and exercise.

“With an estimated 182,460 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2008, breast cancer is recognized as the most common cancer affecting U.S. women,” says Dr. Tricia M Peters from the U.S. National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, who headed up an international team of researchers. Vigorous exercise has been hypothesized to reduce cancer risk for some time. However, this new study is one of the first prospective investigations to look at the importance of various intensities of exercise at different stages in an individual’s life.

Over 110,000 post menopausal women were asked to rate their level of physical activity at ages 15-18, 19-29, 35-39, and in the past 10 years. It was found, over 6.6 years of follow up, that women who engaged in more than 7 hours per week of moderate-to-vigorous exercise for the last ten years were 16% less likely to develop breast cancer than those who were inactive. However, no link was observed between breast cancer risk and physical activity in women who were active at a younger age.

via Recent, Vigorous Exercise Is Associated With Reduced Breast Cancer Risk.

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