DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘DIABETES’

INTER-SPECIES PANCREAS TRANSPLANT REVERSES DIABETES

In HEALTH AND WELLNESS, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 8, 2017 at 12:33 pm

Color Rat Laboratory Cage Mammal Rat Rodent Pet

Let’s take a page out of what was not too long ago science fiction; which is now science-fact.

  • A pancreas was grown in a rat,
  • the organ was transplanted into a mouse,
  • the mouse was given immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection,
  • the diabetic mice were able to normalize their blood glucose levels for over a year.

This illustrates the long proven regenerative capacity of stem cells and the recent advancements scientists have made with anti-rejection protocols…And of course, the cool inter-species transplant of rat to mouse.

Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice

Growing organs from one species in the body of another may one day relieve transplant shortages. Now researchers show that islets from rat-grown mouse pancreases can reverse disease when transplanted into diabetic mice.

White rat with black patches

A rat in which researchers were able to grow a mouse pancreas. Islets from the pancreases were transplanted into mice with diabetes. The transplants helped control the mice’s blood sugar levels.
Courtesy of the Nakauchi lab

 Mouse pancreases grown in rats generate functional, insulin-producing cells that can reverse diabetes when transplanted into mice with the disease, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Tokyo.

The recipient animals required only days of immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the genetically matched organ rather than lifelong treatment.

The success of the interspecies transplantation suggests that a similar technique could one day be used to generate matched, transplantable human organs in large animals like pigs and sheep.

To conduct the work, the researchers implanted mouse pluripotent stem cells, which can become any cell in the body, into early rat embryos. The rats had been genetically engineered to be unable to develop their own pancreas and were thus forced to rely on the mouse cells for the development of the organ.

Once the rats were born and grown, the researchers transplanted the insulin-producing cells, which cluster together in groups called islets, from the rat-grown pancreases into mice genetically matched to the stem cells that formed the pancreas. These mice had been given a drug to cause them to develop diabetes.

“We found that the diabetic mice were able to normalize their blood glucose levels for over a year after the transplantation of as few as 100 of these islets,” said Hiromitsu Nakauchi, MD, PhD, a professor of genetics at Stanford. “Furthermore, the recipient animals only needed treatment with immunosuppressive drugs for five days after transplantation, rather than the ongoing immunosuppression that would be needed for unmatched organs.”

Nakauchi, who is a member of Stanford’s Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, is the senior author of a paper describing the findings, which was published online Jan. 25 in Nature. Tomoyuki Yamaguchi, PhD, an associate professor of stem cell therapy, and researcher Hideyuki Sato, both from the University of Tokyo, share lead authorship of the paper.

Hiro Nakauchi

Although much research remains to be done, scientist Hiromitsu Nakauchi and his colleagues believe their work with rodents shows that a similar technique could one day be used to generate matched, transplantable human organs in large animals like pigs and sheep.
Wing Hon Films

Organs in short supply

About 76,000 people in the United States are currently waiting for an organ transplant, but organs are in short supply. Generating genetically matched human organs in large animals could relieve the shortage and release transplant recipients from the need for lifelong immunosuppression, the researchers say.

People suffering from diabetes could also benefit from this approach. Diabetes is a life-threating metabolic disease in which a person or animal is unable to either make or respond appropriately to insulin, which is a hormone that allows the body to regulate its blood sugar levels in response to meals or fasting. The disease affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. The transplantation of functional islets from healthy pancreases has been shown to be a potentially viable option to treat diabetes in humans, as long as rejection can be avoided.

The researchers’ current findings come on the heels of a previous study in which they grew rat pancreases in mice. Although the organs appeared functional, they were the size of a normal mouse pancreas rather than a larger rat pancreas. As a result, there were not enough functional islets in the smaller organs to successfully reverse diabetes in rats.

Mouse pancreases grown in rats

In the current study, the researchers swapped the animals’ roles, growing mouse pancreases in rats engineered to lack the organ. The pancreases were able to successfully regulate the rats’ blood sugar levels, indicating they were functioning normally. Rejection of the mouse pancreases by the rats’ immune systems was uncommon because the mouse cells were injected into the rat embryo prior to the development of immune tolerance, which is a period during development when the immune system is trained to recognize its own tissues as “self.” Most of these mouse-derived organs grew to the size expected for a rat pancreas, rendering enough individual islets for transplantation

Next, the researchers transplanted 100 islets from the rat-grown pancreases back into mice with diabetes. Subsequently, these mice were able to successfully control their blood sugar levels for over 370 days, the researchers found.

Because the transplanted islets contained some contaminating rat cells, the researchers treated each recipient mouse with immunosuppressive drugs for five days after transplant. After this time, however, the immunosuppression was stopped.

After about 10 months, the researchers removed the islets from a subset of the mice for inspection.

“We examined them closely for the presence of any rat cells, but we found that the mouse’s immune system had eliminated them,” said Nakauchi. “This is very promising for our hope to transplant human organs grown in animals because it suggests that any contaminating animal cells could be eliminated by the patient’s immune system after transplant.”

Importantly, the researchers also did not see any signs of tumor formation or other abnormalities caused by the pluripotent mouse stem cells that formed the islets. Tumor formation is often a concern when pluripotent stem cells are used in an animal due to the cells’ remarkable developmental plasticity. The researchers believe the lack of any signs of cancer is likely due to the fact that the mouse pluripotent stem cells were guided to generate a pancreas within the developing rat embryo, rather than coaxed to develop into islet cells in the laboratory. The researchers are working on similar animal-to-animal experiments to generate kidneys, livers and lungs.

Although the findings provide proof-of-principle for future work, much research remains to be done. Ethical considerations are also important when human stem cells are transplanted into animal embryos, the researchers acknowledge.

The research was funded by the Japan Science and Technology Agency, the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, a KAKENHI grant, the Japan Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Network and the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Stanford’s Department of Genetics also supported the work.

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WHAT DOES THE FOXO1 SAY? HERE’S MORE INSULIN!

In ALL ARTICLES, BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS on July 5, 2014 at 10:20 am
It May Take Guts to Cure Diabetes -Human GI Cells Retrained to Produce Insulin

Imagine taking cells from your gastrointestinal tract and then switching off one gene, the FOXO1 gene, and then ending up with insulin producing cells.  From gut cell to diabetes fighter in one easy gene switch-off.  Scientists did this successfully in 2012 in mice and recently in humans.  What does the FOXO1 say? ‘Here’s more insulin!’  Awesome.

The next step is where it gets…awkward.  I’d like this information to generate a gene therapy protocol or to improve success rates in stem cell/Diabetes treatment protocols,  etc.  But that’s not the way our system works.  The next step is to find a drug that inhibits the FOXO1 gene so it “…could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin…”  Unfortunately, this drug will also have side effects as all drugs do which will create other symptoms requiring other drugs to mitigate.  And so it goes.

When will US Diabetes patients be able to benefit from a medical protocol based on this discovery?  An educated guess puts it at:
7-10 years for clinical trials and drug development for a name brand Pharma product and then 10-15 years for the drug patent to open up to an affordable generic.
Sorry Diabetes patients.

New York, NY (June 30, 2014) “By switching off a single gene, scientists at Columbia University’s Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin…The Columbia researchers were able to teach human gut cells to make insulin in response to physiological circumstances by deactivating the cells’ FOXO1 gene.”

WHAT PRICE HEALTH?

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 2, 2013 at 4:02 pm

https://i2.wp.com/www.defendingfoodsafety.com/uploads/image/FDA%20-%20Grant%20Money.jpg

Greg said:

“Dave, word on the grapevine is a few stem cell professionals almost or did come to blows over the FDA nonsense. They couldn’t understand how the FDA has been stonewalling them when the FDA has okayed dangerous drugs with far less data and safety.”

I responded:

“This has been going on for some time. Simply put, there are a number of docs and treatment centers that are leading the charge, a full frontal assault on the FDA to obtain the right (which should not be something they need to petition for) to use autologous (from the patient’s own body) adult stem cells for treatment. There are a number of regulations that need to be met and federal, state and local law before one can treat in the USA. Almost nobody knows how to do this. Even those that do, can still come under fire and spend their entire war chest battling in the courts. Even if you win over and over, you still can waste valuable time, money and energy better spent treating patients and researching protocols and developing ideas.

There are also many patient groups who are actively lobbying for these rights and numerous petitions floating around. The call to arms I recently wrote which I am putting the finishing touches on, entitled “The Public Wants Stem Cell Treatments” addresses these issues directly. These are the front lines my friends and the docs and patients are on one side and the FDA and upstart regulatory bureaus trying to get a market share of stem cell regulation are on the other. Welcome to the wild west. The mortars and shrapnel are flying and anyone who sticks their head out of the fox hole will incur a mortal wound.

The number of hoops required to jump through are daunting and almost nobody knows how and fewer are willing to take the chance but the potential upside is thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of chronic and terminally ill patients with incurable disease recovering, going into remission, reclaiming their health and their lives.

What’s the value of that? What price can we put on our health? I’m reminded of the old credit card commercials…

Chronic disease = $30-150,000 per year
Loss of income from inability to work = $30-150,000 per year
Adult stem cell treatment = $8 – 10,000
Living without symptoms after treatment = Priceless
Living to see your daughter married = Priceless
Living to see your grandchild born = Priceless
Living without pain = Pricelesshttps://i1.wp.com/www.statusant.com/large/Today-be-thankful-and-think-how-rich-you-are.-Your-family-is-priceless%7C2C-your-time-is-gold-and-your-health-is-wealth.-status.jpgRelated articles

STEM CELL THERAPY REVERSES DIABETES

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 7, 2013 at 9:00 am

recent-blood-cell-news

“…findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility and safety of Stem Cell Educator therapy and demonstrate that Type 1 Diabetes patients achieve improved metabolic control and reduced autoimmunity that lasts months following a single treatment.”  “…clinical data provide powerful evidence that reversal of autoimmunity leads to regeneration of islet β cells and improvement of metabolic control in long-standing Type 1 Diabetes subjects. This principle may also be beneficial in the treatment of other autoimmune-related diseases.”

Stem Cell Therapy Reverses Diabetes: Stem Cells from Cord Blood Used to Re-Educate Diabetic’s Own T Cells

Type 1 diabetes is caused by the body’s own immune system attacking its pancreatic islet beta cells and requires daily injections of insulin to regulate the patient’s blood glucose levels. A new method described in BioMed Central‘s open access journal BMC Medicine uses stem cells from cord blood to re-educate a diabetic’s own T cells and consequently restart pancreatic function reducing the need for insulin.

Stem Cell Educator therapy slowly passes lymphocytes separated from a patient’s blood over immobilized cord blood stem cells (CBSC) from healthy donors. After two to three hours in the device the re-educated lymphocytes are returned to the patient. The progress of the patients was checked at 4, 12, 24 and 40 weeks after therapy.

C-peptide is a protein fragment made as a by-product of insulin manufacture and can be used to determine how well beta cells are working. By 12 weeks after treatment all the patients who received the therapy had improved levels of C-peptide. This continued to improve at 24 weeks and was maintained to the end of the study. This meant that the daily dose of insulin required to maintain their blood glucose levels could be reduced. In accordance with these results the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) indicator of long term glucose control also dropped for people receiving the treatment, but not the control group.

Dr Yong Zhao, from University of Illinois at Chicago, who led the multi-centre research, explained: “We also saw an improved autoimmune control in these patients. Stem Cell Educator therapy increased the percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes in the blood of people in the treatment group. Other markers of immune function, such as TGF-beta1 also improved. Our results suggest that it is this improvement in autoimmune control, mediated by the autoimmune regulator AIRE in the CBSC, which allows the pancreatic islet beta cells to recover.”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012.htm

To view the full research article – http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/3

To view the clinical trial – http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350219

PANCREATIC STEM CELLS, ONE STEP CLOSER TO A CURE

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on December 12, 2012 at 9:00 am

360_diabetes_0413

Millions of people in the United States suffer with type 1 diabetes and are unable to produce sufficient insulin. “As of 2010, 25.8 million people—8.3% of the population—have diabetes; 1.9 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older in 2010.” (http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/consumer/research.htm) “… About 27 percent of those with diabetes—7 million Americans—do not know they have the disease. Pre-diabetes affects 35 percent of adults aged 20 and older. (http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2011/p0126_diabetes.html) The potential to transplant insulin-producing cells into patients suffering from Diabetes would be a critical step forward and could offer hope for a long-term cure.
-DG

The potential to one day treat type 1 diabetes using transplants of insulin-producing beta-cells derived from pancreatic progenitors may have just crept a tad closer, if findings by a group of researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) can be verified. The team has identified a cell surface marker on a subpopulation of cells in the pancreas that appears to identify them as pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs), a cell type which has never actually been firmly demonstrated in human or animal tissues.

A current approach to cell replacement therapy for diabetes involves the transplantation of pancreatic islets, which involves numerous transplant procedures. Although it is feasibly possible to derive insulin-producing cells from either human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), there are technical issues which have yet to be solved. What is ideally needed is a source of stem cells derived directly from the pancreas that can readily be prompted to differentiate into the desired cell type.

Research by Alberto Hayek, Ph.D., and colleagues now indicates that human pancreatic ductal cells that express the cell surface stem cell marker stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4) may represent this elusive population of PnSCs that has long been postulated but never quite isolated. The cells, located in the exocrine portion of the adult human pancreas but not inside islets themselves, also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, the investigators found that SSEA4-expressing cells isolated from fetal pancreatic tissue additionally express a recognized marker of endocrine progenitor cells.

Notably, when the UCSDF team then isolated adult human pancreatic SSEA4+ cells and cultured them in media containing high levels of glucose and B27 supplements, the cells formed aggregate-like spheres and differentiated readily into pancreatic hormone-expressing cells.
“Accumulated evidence supports the concept that pancreatic stem/progenitor cells may originate in the pancreatic duct, where they reside in a quiescent stage,” the authors remark. “We are first to identify SSEA4+ cells in the adult human pancreas with characteristics of pancreatic progenitors. Further clonal analysis would confirm their stemness…. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells.

Dr. Hayek et al., report on their findings in BioResearch Open Access, in a paper titled “Is stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 a marker for human ductal/stem/progenitor cells?”

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/pancreatic-stem-cells-could-they-treat-diabetes/81247218/

STEM CELLS DEVELOP BEST IN 3D

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 24, 2012 at 8:19 am

Scientists have reported improved results for creating insulin-producing cells within a 3 dimensional environment, as opposed to the standard 2 dimension within a Petri dish.  By creating an environment that mimics the inside of an embryo, scientists are able to use this new knowledge to improve diabetes treatment and stem cell treatments for chronic diseases of internal organs.

Scientists from The Danish Stem Cell Center (DanStem) at the University of Copenhagen are contributing important knowledge about how stem cells develop best into insulin-producing cells. In the long-term this new knowledge can improve diabetes treatment with cell therapy. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

Stem cells are responsible for tissue growth and tissue repair after injury. Therefore, the discovery that these vital cells grow better in a three-dimensional environment is important for the future treatment of disease with stem cell therapy. “We can see that the quality of the cells produced two-dimensionally is not good enough. By putting the cells in a three-dimensional environment and giving them the proper growth conditions, we get much better results. Therefore we are developing a three-dimensional culture medium in gelatine in the laboratory to mimic the one inside an embryo,” says Professor Anne Grapin-Botton from DanStem at the University of Copenhagen, who produced the results together with colleagues from Switzerland and Belgium.

The international research team hopes that the new knowledge about three-dimensional cell growth environments can make a significant contribution to the development of cell therapies for treating diabetes. In the long-term this knowledge can also be used to develop stem cell treatments for chronic diseases in internal organs such as the liver or lungs. Like the pancreas, these organs are developed from stem cells in 3D.

The research team has investigated how the three-dimensional organization of tissue in the early embryonic stage influences development from stem cells to more specialized cells. “We can see that the pancreas looks like a beautiful little tree with branches. Stem cells along the branches need this structure to be able to create insulin-producing cells in the embryo. Our research suggests that in the laboratory beta cells can develop better from stem cells in 3D than if we try to get them to develop flat in a Petri dish,” explains Professor Grapin-Botton.

“Attempts to develop functional beta cells in 2D have unfortunately most often resulted in poorly functioning cells. Our results from developing cells in 3D have yielded promising results and are therefore an important step on the way to developing cell therapies for treating diabetes.”The research is supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, Swiss National Research Foundation, and the National Institute of Health (NIH), USA.

The results from the paper “Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis” have just been published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

http://news.ku.dk/all_news/2012/2012.11/stem_cells_develop_best_in_3d/

ADULT Stem Cell Therapy Reverses Diabetes – CBS 42

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 18, 2012 at 9:12 am

ADULT Stem Cell Therapy Reverses Diabetes

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire)- Type 1 diabetes is caused by the body’s own immune system attacking its pancreatic islet beta cells and requires daily injections of insulin to regulate the patient’s blood glucose levels.

A new method found in the BioMed Central’s open access journal BMC Medicine uses stem cells from cord blood to reeducate the T cells in a diabetic’s blood to restart the pancreatic function and reduce the need for insulin. In Stem Cell Educator therapy, lymphocytes were separated from a patient’s blood over immobilized donated cord blood stem cells. After two or three hours in the device the revamped lymphocytes are returned to the patient. Progress was checked at 4, 12, 24 and 40 weeks after therapy.

After 12 weeks results showed an increase in C-peptide levels. C-peptide is a protein fragment created from insulin that can be used to determine how well beta cells are working. Levels increased at 24 weeks and remained the same at the end of the study, meaning that the patient’s daily dose of insulin could be reduced. Also results showed that the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) indicator of long term glucose control also dropped for people receiving the treatment.

Dr Yong Zhao, from University of Illinois at Chicago, was quoted as saying, “We also saw an improved autoimmune control in these patients. Stem Cell Educator therapy increased the percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes in the blood of people in the treatment group. Other markers of immune function, such as TGF-beta1 also improved. Our results suggest that it is this improvement in autoimmune control, mediated by the autoimmune regulator AIRE in the CBSC, which allows the pancreatic islet beta cells to recover.”

Source: BMC Medicine, January 2012

Stem Cell Therapy Reverses Diabetes – CBS 42 Birmingham, AL News Weather Sports.

Medical News: Stem Cells Help in Type 1 Diabetes – in Endocrinology, Diabetes from MedPage Today

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 12, 2012 at 9:33 pm

Medical News: Stem Cells May Help in Type 1 Diabetes – in Endocrinology, Diabetes from MedPage Today.

Action Points  


    • A study in 15 patients, 12 of whom received the treatment, found that lymphocytes “re-educated” by passage with cord blood stem cells, were effective in treating patients with type 1 diabetes with and without residual beta cell function.
  • Both insulin requirements and glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly in the treated patients with effects lasting out to 40 weeks.

Therapy using the patient’s lymphocytes passed through a device with cord blood stem cells may “educate” the patient’s cells to provide safe, lasting treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes, according to the results of a small Chinese study.

Those patients with moderate diabetes and some residual beta cell function (Group A) exhibited improved fasting C-peptide levels at 12 and 24 weeks post-treatment, Yong Zhao, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues reported online in BMC Medicine.

Patients with more severe disease and no residual beta cell function (Group B) also showed improvement at every follow-up…

INTESTINAL STEM CELLS RESPOND TO FOOD BY SUPERSIZING THE GUT

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on October 27, 2011 at 6:24 pm

Request more treatment info.

INTESTINAL STEM CELLS RESPOND TO FOOD BY SUPERSIZING THE GUT

SO now we know that stem cells change your body all the time to deal with changes in your environment and what you eat.  Is it getting clearer? – David

Intestinal stem cells respond to food by supersizing the gut

BERKELEY —

A new study from University of California, Berkeley, researchers demonstrates that adult stem cells can reshape our organs in response to changes in the body and the environment, a finding that could have implications for diabetes and obesity…

Intestinal stem cells respond to food by supersizing the gut.

DIABETES CLINICAL TRIALS

  • FIRST USE OF CORD BLOOD TO ALTER COURSE OF TYPE 1 DIABETES, June 25, 2007 – (I’ll bet nobody heard of this one!)transfusion of stored, autologous (i.e. the person’s own), umbilical cord blood into a group of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes appears to have reduced their disease severity, possibly re-setting the immune system and slowing the destruction of their insulin-producing cells, according to a report presented today at the American Diabetes Association’s 67th Annual Scientific Sessions. –http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/media/m_pdf/ADA_T1D_PR-06-25-07.pdf(The ADA in 2007 knew stem cells can treat Diabetes type 1 in children!)
  • Diabetes type 1 stem cell clinical trial – Enrollment 11/2003-4/2008, follow-up until December 2008 – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/14/type-1-diabetes-stem-cells-clinical-trial/
  • Why no diabetes clinical trial s in the US when mice were cured of diabetes type 1 in the 1990’s? –  Weissman, a professor of pathology and developmental biology at Stanford University, states: “Stem cells are rare, self-renewing, and can regenerate body tissues.” He repeatedly expressed frustration that while many of his discoveries seemed to hold remarkable potential for life-saving treatments, commercial or regulatory hurdles have prevented his scientific research from benefiting human beings. One example is, his mid-’90s research on type I diabetes, in which he demonstrated the ability to fully cure type I diabetes in mice using stem cells. Even though the experiments avoided political controversy by using adult/repair stem cells, which do not come from embryos, Weissman ran into a road block when pharmaceutical companies refused to sponsor clinical trials. The therapy went nowhere. “The pharmaceutical companies had put profit over principle, preferring to keep diabetes sufferers dependent on costly insulin than to cure them once and for all.” – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/13/research-from-90s-cures-type-1-diabetes/

If you or a loved one is interested in receiving FREE information on currently available stem cell treatments for DIABETES or PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE, please contact me at dsgrano@gmail.com or for other options, go to: CONTACT ME

HOPE FOR DIABETES SUFFERERS

In ALL ARTICLES on October 27, 2011 at 2:05 pm

THERE IS HOPE

I am continuously amazed at the wet blanket attitude that is projected by so many in light of significant stem cell breakthroughs.

First they say: “stem cell treatment has enabled patients with type 1 diabetes to go for as long as four years without insulin injections”

…pretty awesome huh?

Then they say: “the team warned the treatment may only work in those very recently diagnosed”

…oh, really…bummer.

Let’s just overlook that “recently diagnosed” actually means “recently developed symptoms” (I am fairly sure they don’t mean a 75 yr old grandmother who was “recently diagnosed” as having lived with diabetes for 55 years.) and as my friend the actuary likes to say: “Let’s just concentrate on the numbers.”

  • · Diabetes Prevalence – Total: 23.6 million children and adults — 8.0% of the population — have diabetes.  The total prevalence of diabetes increased 13.5% from 2005-2007.
  • · Diagnosed: 17.9 million people
  • · Undiagnosed: 5.7 million people (24%!)
  • · Pre-diabetes: 57 million people
  • · 1.6 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older in 2007.

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-statistics.jsp

———————–

Ok, those are the numbers….So how SHOULD this article have been written?

How about…

World celebrates as new results prove diabetes pandemic can be stopped in it’s tracks with early detection!  Government to spend 10 million on improved early diabetes detection. (wait, where would they get the money…oh!) Money to be saved from not having to spend 100 million on late stage diabetes treatments.

Or….

5.7 million undiagnosed diabetes victims can now be saved from the trials of diabetes, amputation, blindness, kidney disease…etc with a single blood test.

Maybe you can come up with a different slant?

Point is; this is HUGE news!  Can we now cure every diabetic in the world?  No.  But we can potentially cure MILLIONS and this is a time for celebration for those people…and a time for optimism for the potential cures for others who are more advanced (as the science improves)…not a time for warnings of limitations.

But no, they stick to the glass is half empty position and say:
“It would be wrong to unnecessarily raise the hopes of people living with diabetes about a new treatment for the condition on the back of the evidence provided in this study.”

But you know what I think?

I think caution is good…but we are talking about people who are living with diabetes!  In my book, that makes them pretty damn tough already.  They are not little kittens and they don’t have to have their hopes “managed” or “spoon fed” to them.  In fact, raising their hopes may be EXACTLY what they need to survive through one more day of diabetes related pills and insulin, threats of blindness and amputation, reduction of lifespan, kidney and liver disease…etc. etc.

So celebrate the victories, embrace the hope and ALWAYS remember:

“If you lose hope, somehow you lose the vitality that keeps life moving, you lose that courage to be, that quality that helps you go on in spite of it all. And so today I still have a dream.” Martin Luther King, Jr.

And as far as false hope, there is no such thing. There is only hope or the absence of hope-nothing else. – Patti Davis

 

hope-1

“There is only hope or the absence of hope-nothing else.

DAMN STRAIGHT!

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