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Posts Tagged ‘clinical trial’

Parkinson’s patients fund their own stem cell research

In BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 19, 2013 at 9:00 am

parkinsons

Healing Parkinson’s patients with their own stem cells

Up to 1 million Americans have Parkinson’s, according to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation. Because aging is the chief risk factor for the disease, the patient population is expected to increase as the baby boom generation gets older.  Parkinson’s selectively kills brain cells that make the neurotransmitter dopamine, which enables movement. No one knows how it happens, or how to stop it. Researchers expect that transplanted dopamine-producing brain cells will eventually die, but perhaps not for 10 to 15 years.

The most visible symptoms of Parkinson’s include tremors, slowed movement, stooped posture and loss of balance, and trouble speaking. People sometimes walk with a shuffling gait, and they may experience severe and chronic pain. Patients’ faces can assume a mask-like expression.  Drugs that provide dopamine or mimic its effects can partially relieve the symptoms, but they produce side effects such as uncontrolled movement. Also, their effectiveness decreases over time.

A groundbreaking stem cell treatment for Parkinson’s disease is getting close to moving from lab research in La Jolla to therapy for patients. The research, funded by the patients and their supporters, could also pioneer a new model for moving medical advances from the lab into the clinic.

Eight Parkinson’s patients have allied with scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and medical professionals from Scripps Clinic for the project, which involves creating new brain cells from other cells in their own bodies. Because of the unusual, personalized nature of the research, the patients are participating with scientists and doctors as equals, meeting regularly to review the progress.

The ambitious goal is to relieve the movement difficulties Parkinson’s causes by replacing the brain cells the disease destroys. In theory, it would restore near-normal movement for a decade or more, and the procedure could be repeated as needed.

Research is far enough along that scientists and health care professionals in the project are talking to regulators about beginning clinical trials, perhaps as soon as next year.

The replacement brain cells are now being grown in a lab at The Scripps Research Institute. Patches of skin the diameter of a pencil eraser were removed from the patients’ arms and turned into a new kind of stem cell that acts like embryonic stem cells. Called induced pluripotent stem cells, they were discovered in 2006, a feat honored by a Nobel Prize last year.

These IPS cells can become nearly any kind of cell in the body… Another potential advantage of IPS cells over embryonic stem cells is that they should be less prone to rejection by the patients’ immune systems, because the transplanted cells come from the individuals themselves.

Patient Cassandra Peters, 57, learned of the reality of Parkinson’s and the hope of a new treatment in a visit with Dr. Houser, her neurologist.  “Interestingly, when I first had a conversation with her, when she definitively told me I had Parkinson’s, she said to me, quote, “You will have a stem cell procedure in your lifetime.”  I took that ball and held it in my heart, thinking, this is going to be my ‘get out of jail free’ card.  Not a day goes by when I don’t have an opportunity to share what I’m going through now and what the future might hold,” Peters said.

Ileana Slavin, a research associate in the lab of Jeanne Loring, and Suzanne Peterson, a staff scientist, discuss what it means for scientists to directly meet the people they’re trying to help.  Diabetes researcher Matthias von Herrath of the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology said the work could help scientists developing stem cell therapies for diabetics,” von Herrath said. “And that’s going to open the door for these type of stem cells.”

Loring’s researchers are reaching the final stages of their part of the project. They have made induced pluripotent stem cells from all eight patients, and have turned those into the needed brain cells for two of them. The work continues for the other six.

Parkinson’s represents the “low-hanging fruit” of neurological diseases for stem cell therapy.  We know what cell types are lost in Parkinson’s disease,” Bratt-Leal said in a March 8 meeting of the group. “We can make them from stem cells.  And now we can make stem cells from adult tissues.  The next logical step is to make these cells from people and put them back into them.”

“With IPS cells grown from the patient, rejection should be less of a worry”, Bratt-Leal said.

Now that the research side of the project has overcome its greatest hurdles, the focus is shifting to medicine, Loring said. The replacement brain cells will be grown in a clinical grade facility at the City of Hope in Los Angeles.  As part of the transition to the medical side, Houser will provide expertise in setting up the clinical trial, assuming approval is granted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Beyond the potential benefit to the eight patients, the project may provide an answer to what Loring and other researchers call the “Valley of Death,” the period that halts promising research before it can become a medical treatment.  Most scientific research is federally funded, but commercialization is left to the private sector. If companies don’t see a way to make money, they won’t pursue a therapy, even if it works.  This problem is especially forbidding for treatments customized to individual patients. These don’t produce economies of scale, and hence are not attractive to pharmaceutical companies.  Advocates of the customized Parkinson’s therapy said it will pay off in the long run. Patients will require less medical care, and find it easier to maintain their jobs.

To Read Full Article click HERE.

PIONEERING??? Heart Study

In ALL ARTICLES, CATCH UP!, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 20, 2013 at 9:27 am

This makes me crazy.  Thousands, maybe tens of thousands treated to date successfully with studies going back to 2002 and they call this brand new study pioneering?  Consider the triple blind study protocol used:

  • 1/3 RECEIVE NOTHING AT ALL
  • 1/3 RECEIVE A PLACEBO
  • 1/3 RECEIVE STEM CELLS

The odds are not in his favor to even get the treatment.  It’s time to catch up to the rest of the world. – DG

DeBary man takes part in pioneering stem cell study

Dr. David Henderson, left, talks to his patient Robert Anderson, 64, of DeBary recently at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach. Anderson is participating in a clinical research trial that uses a patient’s own stem cells to regenerate cardiovascular tissue. He was the first patient to enroll in the clinical study that started in December at Cardiology Research Associates of Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center.

News-Journal/STEVEN NOTARAS

By
STAFF WRITER
Published: Monday, February 18, 2013 at 5:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, February 17, 2013 at 5:41 p.m.

DAYTONA BEACH — At 44, Robert Anderson’s career as a chemical engineer was cut short due to pain in his chest and jaw.

A few years earlier doctors had performed bypass surgery on Anderson to repair the deteriorating muscle around his heart. Like 850,000 Americans, Anderson suffers from angina, which causes chest discomfort due to coronary heart disease.

But the surgery was a temporary fix for Anderson, whose diabetes worsened his heart condition. As the pain in his jaw and chest increased when he walked, the DeBary resident was forced into early retirement.

For the past 20 years, Anderson’s life has been limited by his heart condition, which has only worsened.

With no surgical options left, Anderson is hoping his participation in a clinical research trial that uses a patient’s own stem cells to regenerate cardiovascular tissue will improve his quality of life. Some patients taking part in the study also were injected with a placebo…

JAPAN TO HOLD FIRST STEM CELL CLINICAL TRIAL

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2013 at 9:00 am

images

World’s first stem cell clinical trial

Researchers in Japan are looking to use the recent discoveries of Nobel Prize winning Shinya Yamanaka to treat a degenerative eye disease in what would be the world’s first clinical trial of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). An ethics committee at the Institute for Biomedical Research and Innovation gave its approval this week for the trial, meaning work could begin as early as the 2013 fiscal year.

Scientists plan to use iPS cells in a therapy for age-related macular degeneration, or vision loss. The trial will be conducted by a team led by Dr. Masayo Takahashi, and will be done in cooperation with Riken, a scientific research foundation affiliated with Japan’s Ministry of Science and Technology.

Age-related macular degeneration mostly occurs in people who are middle-aged or older, and, if left untreated, often leads to blindness. The current drugs on the market are known for only treating symptoms and not fighting the disease itself. The goal of the clinical trial is to create retinal cell sheets from iPS cells, which take the form of any other cells from the body, and transplant them into patients’ eyes. Six patients, all aged 50 or older and for whom existing drugs do not work, will be chosen from the institute’s hospital and, if successful, have corrected vision below 0.3 on the Japanese scale. The Japanese government has already stated it will be spending 110 billion yen (approx. $1.18 billion) over the next 10 years to sponsor research on the application of iPS cells.

“Japan is yet another country that has envisioned the potential stem cell therapies hold for regenerative medicine. ” – DG

To see full article click HERE.

FDA APPROVED SCHWANN CELL TRANSPLANT

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 29, 2013 at 9:00 am

 nerve1sm

Doctors Perform First FDA Approved Schwann Cell Transplant in Patient with New Spinal Cord Injury

Doctors at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, performed the first-ever Food and Drug Administration approved Schwann cell transplantation in a patient with a new spinal cord injury. The procedure, performed at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center, is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transplanting the patient’s own Schwann cells.

“This historic clinical trial represents a giant step forward in a field of medicine where each tangible step has tremendous value. This trial, and these first patients in this trial specifically, are extremely important to our mission of curing paralysis,” said neurosurgeon Barth Green, M.D., Co-Founder and Chairman of The Miami Project, and Professor and Chair of Neurological Surgery. “The Miami Project team includes hundreds of scientists, clinicians, and technicians who have joined hands to make the ‘impossible possible,’ for which this trial is a key goal and dream now being realized. This achievement reaffirms that the tens of millions of dollars and the incalculable work hours were well invested in this first of a kind human Schwann cell project.”

Led by W. Dalton Dietrich, Ph.D., Scientific Director of The Miami Project and Professor of Neurological Surgery, Neurology and Cell Biology & Anatomy, the Schwann cell clinical trial team at The Miami Project is composed of a multidisciplinary group of basic science and clinical faculty members, scientific staff, and regulatory personnel focused on advancing the trial. The transplantation procedure was conducted by the Principal Investigators of the trial, Dr. Allan Levi, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery, Orthopedic, and Rehabilitation, and James Guest, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery. The patient had a neurologically complete thoracic spinal injury and received the transplantation of autologous Schwann cells about four weeks post-injury. There have been no adverse events and the team is moving forward with the trial.

 schwann_cell

This image shows a cultured Schwann cell stained for the actin cytoskeleton with phalloidin-Rd.

SCHWANN CELL:

“a cell that forms spiral layers around a myelinated nerve fiber between two nodes of Ranvier and forms the myelin sheath consisting of the inner spiral layers from which the protoplasm has been squeezed out.”   (Source)

“As a basic scientist, the hope is always to increase knowledge and discovery,” said Dietrich. “Not every day are you able to see that translated into the clinical realm with the hopes of bettering the lives of those suffering, so this Phase I clinical trial is a vital step for the field of SCI research, and for The Miami Project team that has been working diligently on this therapeutic concept for more than a quarter of a century. This trial, when completed successfully, will lay the critical foundation for future cell-based therapies to target spinal cord injuries.”

The Miami Project clinical trial will enroll a total of eight participants with acute thoracic SCI. Newly injured patients brought to the trauma center would have to meet the stringent inclusion criteria. The participants will undergo a biopsy of a sensory nerve in one leg to obtain the tissue from which to grow their own Schwann cells. The Schwann cells are then grown in a state-of-the art culturing facility for three to five weeks to generate the number of cells necessary for transplantation, and to undergo the strict purification process. By the time the Schwann cells are surgically transplanted into the injury site, participants will be 26-42 days post-injury.

All procedures will be conducted at UM/Jackson and The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, with colleagues at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Each participant will be followed intensively for one year after receiving the transplantation surgery, and their neurologic status, medical status, pain symptoms, and muscle spasticity will be evaluated. It is expected that it could be two to three years from the time the first subject is enrolled until the final subject is one year post-transplantation. All participants will continue to be monitored for an additional four years under a separate clinical protocol. This Phase I trial is the foundation upon which The Miami Project will develop future cell transplant trials targeting different types of injuries, times post-injury, and therapeutic combinations.

Posted on January 24, 2013 By Neuroscience News Featured, Neurology (Source)

STEM CELL TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATING INTERVERTEBRAL DISCS

In ALL ARTICLES, BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 13, 2013 at 9:53 am

spine-stem-cells

Stem cell treatment for spine tested

An Australian-invented stem cell treatment for spinal surgery has been successfully used for the first time in the United States.  The patented stem cells product created by Melbourne-based company Mesoblast was trialed in a small group of patients with spinal discs that had degenerated beyond repair.  The bone marrow-derived stem cells – called mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) – were used to promote bone growth to fuse together spinal vertebrae, to eliminate debilitating leg and back pain.

If the procedure ultimately passes the final stage of clinical trials and is approved by America’s drug regulator, it would potentially provide patients worldwide with a quicker and less invasive procedure.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved trial compared the use of stem cells to fuse vertebrae with bone harvested from the patient’s own hip, the current gold standard for this common operation.  The stem cells were used in conjunction with two chemicals to encourage bone growth, said Texas surgeon Dr Randall Dryer, who performed a number of surgical procedures in the trial.  The chemicals, hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, are non-cellular components of bone that tell the stem cells to turn into bone-forming cells, rather than other tissues, “If you put these cells into an environment that stimulates them to grow into bone, they do.  That eliminates us having to take the patient’s own bone from a different location to pack in there“, said Dr. Dryer, an orthopedic surgeon at the Central Texas Institute in Austin.

Eight of the 24 patients enrolled in the trial had the surgery using their own bone.  Of these, six patients’ bone had successfully fused after a year.  Six out of seven patients given a low concentration of stem cells had equally successful results, while five out of eight patients given a higher concentration of stem cells achieved the bone fusion.  “These stem cells work at least as good as or better than the patients’ own bone.”  The advantage of the operation is that it cancels the need to harvest the patient’s own bone, which lengthens the surgery time, is more painful and can lead to more complications.  This is hopefully going to be a new tool that we can use to help patients recover less painfully, quicker and with just the same effectiveness.” There were no adverse events in the phase two trial, which tests the product for safety and efficacy.  The company plans to apply for FDA approval to conduct a larger phase three trial in the United States, Europe and Australia later this year.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/breaking-news/stem-cell-treatment-for-spine-tested/story-fn3dxiwe-1226551833859

Related articles

PROMISING RESULTS FOUND IN NEW STEM CELL TRANSPLANT TECHNIQUE

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 4, 2013 at 9:00 am

Many years ago, researchers tested a theory of using two unrelated units of cord blood to produce an increased volume of stem cells, which would decrease the engraftment time frame in adults suffering from blood disorders. The newly expanded procedure proves promising results and will soon begin human clinical trials.

A team of researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston has come up with a new way to make stem cell transplants more effective in patients with leukemia, lymphoma and other blood cancers and disorders. The study, whose findings were published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, is the first of its kind to show favorable results in manipulating one batch of stem cells in patients who undergo a double cord blood transplant. The promising results have paved the way for expanding the study from one site to an international, multicenter clinical trial.
University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center is poised to become one of those sites. Between 15 and 25 patients will be enrolled, said Dr. Marcos de Lima, lead study author who joined UH in the fall to become section chief of hematologic malignancies and bone marrow transplantation at Seidman and professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. With study sites opening up elsewhere in the United States and in Europe, several hundred patients will be able to take part in the trial, said de Lima. He said he hopes enrollment will start within the next year.
Cord blood, which is filled with adult stem cells similar to those found in bone marrow, is extracted from an umbilical cord and placenta shortly after a baby is born. Transplanting cord blood instead of bone marrow or peripheral blood has several advantages, among them that the cord blood doesn’t have to be a perfect match for a patient. That opens up the number of potential matches that are available for patients, especially those who are ethnic minorities. But among the limitations were the time it took for donor cells to begin making new blood cells, called engraftment, and the relatively small amount of cells that can be obtained from one cord blood unit — a problem for adult patients.
The first double cord blood transplants using two unrelated units of cord blood, designed to make transplantation more effective in adults, were conducted more than a dozen years ago. The ability to produce a higher volume of stem cells from the two transplanted units still did not solve the problem of the length of time from infusion to engraftment. “The longer you go without red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, the more trouble you have,” de Lima said. All of those things are essential to ward off infection, bleeding, and anemia.  To get around that hurdle, the MD Anderson team decided to see if they could make more of the cord blood cells in the lab in conditions that mimic that of bone marrow. One unit was transplanted unchanged, while the second unit was “expanded” in the lab — before transplant — using a type of cell found in bone marrow called mesenchymal stromal cell.
The study, which opened in 2007 and lasted for three years, enrolled 31 patients at MD Anderson, all of whom received two cord blood units with the new treatment. An additional 140 patients from MD Anderson and elsewhere also received two units of unmanipulated cord blood, and were the control group. The result of the expansion treatment was quicker engraftment, compared to other patients treated with the more traditional double cord blood transplant method. The most unexpected study outcome, de Lima said, was the reduction in time it took to resume production of platelets, a key in protecting against excessive bleeding.
“Traditionally, platelets are a big problem,” said de Lima, adding that patients typically have to undergo numerous transfusions. With the new method, “We saw much more consistent, solid [development], and people needed less transfusion. That was a pleasant surprise,” he said.

http://www.cleveland.com

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STEM CELLS MAY CONQUER INFERTILITY IN CANCER SURVIVORS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on December 10, 2012 at 9:00 am

sperm stem cells

Cancer survivors, who have undergone radiation or chemotherapy treatments, are often met with the dismal reality of infertility.  Oncologists, for years, have been unable to address the long-term and permanent consequences of these life saving treatments.  New research conducted on the concept of using spermatogonial stem cells to restore fertility has proven to be a success in male primates and is getting closer to clinical trials.

-DG

A UTSA professor has now demonstrated that it is possible to remove testicular stem cells from a monkey prior to chemotherapy, freeze them and later, after cancer treatments, transplant these cells where they can restart sperm production and restore fertility.  UTSA Assistant Professor Brian Hermann worked in collaboration with researchers at the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine Magee-Women’s Research Institute (MWRI) on a technique that might be used to make male cancer patients fertile using their own spermatogonial stem cells.

“This is a really exciting milestone for this research,” said John McCarrey, director of the San Antonio Cellular Therapeutics Institute. “This is the first time that anybody has been able to show the concept works in a primate model, and that is an important step in moving the research forward to clinical trials.”

While men facing cancer treatments, which could cause infertility, are able to store their own sperm for future use in the fertility clinic, this is not an option for boys before puberty who are not yet making sperm. But, all pre-pubertal boys have spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in their testes, which could be used for transplantation.  The concept of using spermatogonial stem cells to restore fertility was first introduced in the mid-1990s by University of Pennsylvania scholar Ralph L. Brinster. Since that time, scholars have been working to demonstrate the concept is viable.  But, more work is required. The research must overcome a number of hurdles before it can become a common clinical practice.  “This research demonstrates the proof of principle — that the concept works in primates and has a good chance of working in humans,” said Hermann. “We need to better understand the optimal timing of transplantation, how to prepare testicular stem cells for transplantation and make them safe for transplantation, and how to maximize their ability to restart sperm production.”  But, it’s difficult for researchers to know when clinical trials will begin, since the removal and storage of spermatogonial stem cells currently is a rare practice worldwide.

“There are currently only a handful of clinics around the world that will remove and preserve testicular stem cell samples from pre-pubertal patients, and that limits the availability of candidates,” said Hermann. “Until more clinics get on board and save stem cells for patients, we are limited in what we can do to test transplantation in clinical trials.”

Hermann joined the UTSA College of Sciences faculty in summer 2011, following a post-doctoral fellowship at MWRI alongside Associate Professor Kyle Orwig. At UTSA, he is continuing to focus his research on basic and translational studies of spermatogonial stem cells to preserve fertility in boys treated for cancer and related diseases.  “For a long time, oncologists have been unable to address the long-term consequences of life-saving chemotherapy and radiation treatments such as infertility,” said Hermann. “That is now beginning to change as laboratory research such as this study provides new experimental options for patients facing infertility after cancer.”

Hermann’s research is funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Fund, and UTSA.

http://bio.utsa.edu/news/brian-hermanns-stem-cell-research-provides-hope-for-infertile-cancer-surviv/#.UMXVuXf4J8g

RESEARCHERS DISCOVER KEY TO STEM CELL THERAPY FOR MS PATIENTS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 30, 2012 at 9:00 am

 clinical trial capsules

We know stem cells work on MS, we just hadn’t figured out exactly how yet…and now we have!

– DG

CLEVELAND, Ohio — One of the most promising and exciting treatment avenues for multiple sclerosis is the use of a patient’s own stem cells to try to stop — or even repair — some of the disease’s brain tissue damage.

But injecting a patient with a dose of his or her own bone-marrow stem cells was actually a pretty crude method of treating the disease, because no one was quite sure how or why it worked. Last year, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University began trying this for MS patients in a Phase 1 clinical trial after positive results were seen in mice.

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheaths that surround and protect nerve cells. When myelin is damaged, the nerve cells are exposed and unable to do their job, which is sending signals to the brain and back. This results in the loss of motor skills, coordination and cognitive abilities.

Like many other researchers using stem cells, the local group didn’t know exactly how their treatment worked, but they knew that when they gave these human mesenchymal stem cells, or MSCs, to mice with a mouse version of the disease, the mice got better.

Figuring out why the mice improved could help researchers see if the MSC injection will work well in a particular patient before the patient is injected, and possibly augment or improve the treatment as well.

In May, the research group at CWRU, headed up by neurosciences professor Robert Miller, discovered exactly what it is in the stem-cell soup that has a healing effect: a large molecule called hepatocyte growth factor, or HGF. The team published their results in Nature Neuroscience.

Miller’s group knew that it could be the stem cells themselves, by coming in physical contact with the myelin damage, that were having a healing effect. Or it could be something the stem cells secreted into the surrounding liquid culture, or media, they were grown in, that was key. HGF is secreted by the stem cells, Miller said.

The team identified the HGF by first injecting only the liquid the stem cells were grown in, but not the stem cells themselves, into the mice they were studying. The mice got better, so the team knew whatever was helping was in the media.

Next, they isolated the small, medium and large molecules from the media and tried each size on the mice. Only the large-molecule treatment had the healing effect, meaning that whatever was helping was somewhere in that mix, Miller said.

“The molecule that jumped out at us was HGF,” he said, because it is the right size, is made by MSCs, and in a couple of studies had been shown to be involved in myelin repair.

So the scientists took a purified sample of HGF and injected it into the sick mice. They got better. When they blocked the receptor for HGF in the mice, they stayed sick. It was pretty compelling evidence that they’d found what they’d been looking for, Miller said.

“We went on to show that HGF, like the MSCs, is regulating both the immune response, and it is independently promoting myelin repair in the brain,” he said.

MSCs, taken from the bone marrow, are currently being tested in more than 150 clinical trials in the United States and around the world to treat conditions such as osteoarthritis, diabetes, emphysema and stroke.

The local Phase 1 trial has enrolled 16 of 24 total patients, and eight of them have completed the trial protocol, said Dr. Jeffrey Cohen, Cleveland Clinic neurologist and lead investigator of the trial.

So far, the treatment seems to be working, Cohen said.

“It’s a little early to be saying it, but things have looked encouraging.”

And there have been no safety concerns and almost no side effects. There has also been no activation — an aggravation or return of symptoms — of this relapsing disease in the patients involved, which has happened unexpectedly with other types of MS treatments.

Miller’s discovery won’t change the course of the trial currently under way at the Clinic and UH, but it may change the future of MSC treatment.

While they don’t know yet what the outcome of that trial will be, it’s possible that if a patient doesn’t respond to the treatment, it could mean that his stem cells aren’t producing enough HGF to be effective at healing, Miller said. Miller will be studying MSC samples from all the patients in the trial to find out if those who are better at producing HGF fare better.

He’ll also be trying to see if they can predict how well a patient will do based on his HGF levels in the MSC sample.

“Finally, though we’re a long way from this, maybe we could augment the expression of HGF in patients whose stem cells aren’t that effective to enhance their effectiveness,” he said.

But why not just inject the HGF alone? Miller said there are two reasons. First, the receptor for HGF in the cells, called c-MET, has been implicated in liver and breast cancer. Injecting HGF by itself into the body may stimulate the c-MET pathway, he said, and the research team is not willing to risk that.

“The stem cells have the advantage that they tend to home to the area of insult, so they don’t stick around in other parts of the body,” he said. “They target the treatment where it’s needed.”

Miller said his group is experimenting with a way of delivering HGF directly into the area of injury in the brain to minimize its contact with the rest of the body. HGF and c-MET are not associated with brain tumors.

They are also trying to test small fragments of the growth factor as a treatment, to see if they can eliminate some of the cancer concerns.

Cohen’s group hopes to have results from the Phase 1 trial available in the spring and has already started planning a larger study based on those results.

http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2012/09/cleveland_researchers_find_key.html

BENNY HILL IS ALIVE AND WELL AS BRITAIN GOES BLIND

In ALL ARTICLES on September 23, 2011 at 7:00 am

Remember in the final scene of every episode of Benny Hill where he does something really scandalous and then gets chased by the entire cast around and around in circles?  Turns out, Benny Hill is ALIVE AND WELL and advising Britain on their medical protocols!  https://i2.wp.com/www.webtvwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/the-benny-hill-show-logo.jpg

You see, Britain, like the USA, is chasing this fleet footed “embryonic stem cell treatment comedy of errors” around and around in circles just like in the Benny Hill episodes.  Every week, the same scene is played out with Benny running, the entire cast chasing and he never gets caught.  So in Art, so in life.  Britain is chasing embryonic stem cells used for treatment of optic diseases.  And remember…

  • Embryonic stem cells STILL have ZERO successful clinical trials
  • Embryonic stem cells STILL cause cysts and tumors that can become cancerous (wait 20 years and ask again though)
  • Embryonic stem cells STILL have rejection issues that require immunosuppressive drugs
  • Embryonic stem cells STILL carry the genetic anomalies of the donor
ON THE OTHER HAND…

So on top of wasting time chasing a cure with no prior history of success and huge negative side effects, thy are running right past a treatment with a huge history of success and safety and trials.

So cue up the cameras, get everyone in costume and let’s start that famous music going as everyone chases embryonic stem cell treatments around and around.  Wait! STOP! Hold it! CUT!

How on earth can we explain the entire medical community and government running right past what already works?  Got it! Give them all blindfolds!  That way they can be assured to miss the forest but they will hit every damn tree in it and so will the patients, patiently waiting for treatments which will never come!

…annndddd   ACTION!!!

Iris of a human eye

First trial of embryonic stem cell treatment in Europe gets green light

Patients in Britain with an eye disease that leads to blindness will take part in Europe’s first human embryonic stem cell trial

British surgeons are to take part in the first trial in patients of a human embryonic stem cell therapy to gain approval from regulators in Europe.

Surgeons at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London will inject cells into the eyes of 12 patients with an incurable eye disease called Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, one of the main causes of blindness in young people…

Read more

Successful Stem Cell Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury in Dogs

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 8, 2010 at 4:31 pm

Histostem Participates in Successful Stem Cell Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Dogs

https://i0.wp.com/www.anatomytrains.com/uploads/static/Image/Fe%20Dog%20Skel%20Lat.jpg

February 08, 2010: 12:00 PM ET

Stem Cell Therapy International, Inc. (OTCBB: SCII) announced that Histostem Ltd. of South Korea (“Histostem”) has participated in a study resulting in the successful treatment of spinal cord injury in dogs through the use of Multipotent Stem Cells (MSCs) derived from Human Umbilical Cord Blood (HUCB). The study, a collaborative effort between a team of doctors from the Departments of Veterinary Surgery and Veterinary Anatomy at Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea and Dr. Hoon Han, President and Founder of Histostem, presented a method for the percutaneous transplantation of stem cells and investigated the therapeutic efficacy of transplanting stem cells to improve the recovery of the central nervous system following such acute spinal cord injury.

While previous research on spinal cord injury has typically used rats, this study used dogs which have a spinal cord structure more similar to humans. Within the test group, those dogs that received cellular transplants exhibited gradual improvement in hind limb locomotion two to three weeks after the transplant and also demonstrated reduced cyst and injury size.

Dr. Han commented, “Our research demonstrated a new, less invasive method of transplanting human umbilical cord blood derived multipotent stem cells, which avoids surgical exposure and allows the cells to be more precisely transplanted into the spinal cord. In addition to this breakthrough in the technique used to transplant stem cells, we also had success in improving the condition of the spinal cord injury among the test group. Based on the successful results of this study and because of the canine spinal cord’s resemblance to a human spinal cord, we are optimistic that this technique has many potential applications in the treatment of human spinal cord injury through stem cell transplantation.”

More details on the research process and results are available in the December 2009 issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

via Histostem Participates in Successful Stem Cell Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Dogs.

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