DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘CELL’

ULTRASOUND GOES INSIDE LIVE CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on February 17, 2017 at 9:06 am

Researchers at The University of Nottingham have developed a break-through technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells…like ultrasound on the body, ultrasound in the cells causes no damage and requires no toxic chemicals to work. Because of this we can see inside cells that one day might be put back into the body, for instance as stem-cell transplants

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Researchers at The University of Nottingham have developed a break-through technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells, with potential application in stem-cell transplants and cancer diagnosis.

The new nanoscale ultrasound technique uses shorter-than-optical wavelengths of sound and could even rival the optical super-resolution techniques which won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

This new kind of sub-optical phonon (sound) imaging provides invaluable information about the structure, mechanical properties and behaviour of individual living cells at a scale not achieved before.

Researchers from the Optics and Photonics group in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, are behind the discovery, which is published in the paper ‘High resolution 3D imaging of living cells with sub-optical wavelength phonons’ in the journal, Scientific Reports.

“People are most familiar with ultrasound as a way of looking inside the body — in the simplest terms we’ve engineered it to the point where it can look inside an individual cell. Nottingham is currently the only place in the world with this capability,” said Professor Matt Clark, who contributed to the study.

In conventional optical microscopy, which uses light (photons), the size of the smallest object you can see (or the resolution) is limited by the wavelength.

For biological specimens, the wavelength cannot go smaller than that of blue light because the energy carried on photons of light in the ultraviolet (and shorter wavelengths) is so high it can destroy the bonds that hold biological molecules together damaging the cells.

Optical super-resolution imaging also has distinct limitations in biological studies. This is because the fluorescent dyes it uses are often toxic and it requires huge amounts of light and time to observe and reconstruct an image which is damaging to cells.

Unlike light, sound does not have a high-energy payload. This has enabled the Nottingham researchers to use smaller wavelengths and see smaller things and get to higher resolutions without damaging the cell biology.

“A great thing is that, like ultrasound on the body, ultrasound in the cells causes no damage and requires no toxic chemicals to work. Because of this we can see inside cells that one day might be put back into the body, for instance as stem-cell transplants,” adds Professor Clark.

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More information is available from Professor Matt Clark in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham on +44 (0)115 951 5536, matt.clark@nottingham.ac.uk; or Emma Lowry, Media Relations Manager, on +44 (0)115 846 7156, emma.lowry@nottingham.ac.uk

Our academics can now be interviewed for broadcast via our Media Hub, which offers a Globelynx fixed camera and ISDN line facilities at University Park campus. For further information please contact a member of the Communications team on +44 (0)115 951 5798, email mediahub@nottingham.ac.uk or see the Globelynx website for how to register for this service.

About The University of Nottingham: The University of Nottingham has 43,000 students and is ‘the nearest Britain has to a truly global university, with a “distinct” approach to internationalisation, which rests on those full-scale campuses in China and Malaysia, as well as a large presence in its home city.’ (Times Good University Guide 2016). It is also one of the most popular universities in the UK among graduate employers and winner of both ‘University of the Year for Graduate Employment’, according to the 2017 The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide and ‘Outstanding Support for Early Career Researchers’ at the Times Higher Education Awards 2015. It is ranked in the world’s top 75 by the QS World University Rankings 2015/16. More than 97 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is recognised internationally and it is 8th in the UK by research power according to the Research Excellence Framework 2014. It has been voted the world’s greenest campus for four years running, according to Greenmetrics Ranking of World Universities.

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Thomas Gray lived six days, but his life has lasting impact

In ALL ARTICLES, HOPE AND INSPIRATION on March 31, 2015 at 9:47 am

Thomas Gray lived six days, but his life has lasting impact

Sarah Gray reacts to research information about the donated retinas from her son, Thomas, who died at six days old in 2010. Callum, 5, Thomas´ identical twin brother, plays during the visit to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Sarah Gray reacts to research information about the donated retinas from her son, Thomas, who died at six days old in 2010. Callum, 5, Thomas’ identical twin brother, plays during the visit to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Sarah Gray reacts to research information about the donated retinas from her son, Thomas, who died at six days old in 2010. Callum, 5, Thomas´ identical twin brother, plays during the visit to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
Gallery: Thomas Gray lived six days, but his life has lasting impact

Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER

When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia.

She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation.

“Instead of thinking of our son as a victim,” she said, “I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science.”

On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia. Callum, perfect, was five pounds, 10 ounces. Thomas, four pounds, was born without part of his brain. His mother nursed him, diapered him, cradled him.

He died after six days – five years ago on Sunday. Within hours of Thomas’ death, his eyes and liver were recovered and sent – along with umbilical cord blood from him and his brother – to researchers.But that wasn’t the end of it for Sarah Gray.

She often wondered – what became of his eyes, his blood, his liver?

The Grays had received a thank-you letter from the Washington regional transplant organization, telling them their son’s corneas had been sent to the Schepens Eye Research Institute in Boston, and his liver and the cord blood to Duke University in North Carolina.

Two years later, on a business trip to Boston, Sarah Gray called the eye institute, which is affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

“I donated my son’s eyes to your lab,” she said on the phone. “Can I come by for a tour?”

The receptionist said she had never had such a request. “I’m not sure who to transfer you to,” she said, “but don’t hang up!”

The next day, Gray met James Zieske, the institute’s senior scientist, who told her “infant eyes are worth their weight in gold,” because, being so young, they have great regenerative properties. Thomas’ corneas were used in a study that could one day help cure corneal blindness.

Thirteen more studies had cited that study. Gray felt a new emotion: pride.

Before leaving, she bought a Harvard T-shirt for Callum, and decided she was going to go with the whole family to North Carolina, where Thomas’ liver and the cord blood had been sent.

Zieske also wrote her: “Your visit helped to remind me that all the eyes we receive are an incredibly generous gift from someone who loved and cared about the person who provided the eyes. I thank you for reminding me of this.”

A few months later in 2012, the Grays went to the Duke Center for Human Genetics in Durham, N.C., where even though the twins were identical, scientists found epigenetic differences in their cord blood, research that could one day help prevent Thomas’ fatal defect, anencephaly.

Sarah Gray bought Callum a Duke T-shirt.

The couple then drove down to the road to visit Cytonet, a biotech company that had used their baby’s liver in a trial to determine the best temperature to freeze liver tissue.

Already in the nonprofit public relations field, Sarah Gray became director of marketing for the American Association of Tissue Banks.

Her mantra has become donate, donate, donate, and not just for transplant, but also for research. Even if nobody asks you – doctors are often uncomfortable when a child is dying – bring it up yourself, she says.

At a conference last summer, by coincidence, Gray learned that the Old Dominion Eye Bank in North Chesterfield, Va., had shipped Thomas’ retinas to Philadelphia.

She couldn’t believe she’d never known this. She immediately wrote to the researcher at the University of Pennsylvania who used the donation in her efforts to cure retinoblastoma, the most common form of eye cancer in children.

Two days later, Gray got a reply from Arupa Ganguly, who runs the lab and is a genetics professor at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

“It is almost impossible to obtain normal retina from a child,” Ganguly wrote. “The sample from Thomas is extremely precious for us.”

Ganguly sent Callum a Penn T-shirt.

They arranged to meet last Monday.

First, Sarah, Ross, and Callum Gray went to the National Disease Research Interchange in Center City, which Sarah Gray calls “the Match.com of science.” The interchange connects hospitals that supply organs and tissue with researchers who request it.

“This seems to have brought you a lot of peace and joy,” Bill Leinweber, the interchange’s president and CEO, told Sarah. “You’ve been such a strong advocate for research and such an eloquent spokesperson for the value of research.”

After a visit there, the Gray family went to Penn to meet Ganguly and tour her lab.

Sarah Gray saw the marbled composition book in which the receipt of retinas was logged on March 30, 2010, the 360th specimen to be received. They became “RES 360,” short for Research 360.

“Is this the log book?” she asked. “Oh, my gosh.”

Gray ran her index finger over the cursive of Jennifer Yutz, the lab manager who recorded the entry.

“Ross, look at this! Med 360!”

Her husband took a look. Callum, then 4, hugged an inflatable Godzilla as tall as he is, a gift from Ganguly, bouncing it on the lab floor.

“Wow,” Sarah Gray continued. “Can I Xerox this?”

“We have a copy for you,” Ganguly said.

Penn also gave the Grays a copy of the Fed Ex packing slip confirming arrival, which Sarah Gray said she would “treasure like a war medal.”

Thomas’ retina tissue is so rare, so precious, Ganguly and her team are still saving some of it for future research. Ganguly’s staff led Sarah Gray into the hallway, where a refrigerator, innocuous and ordinary, stood across from student lockers. Yutz unlocked it.

Inside were hundreds of 1.5 milliliter tubes – smaller than cigarette filters.

Yutz pointed to two.

“There it is,” Yutz said.

“Oh my gosh!” Gray said. She couldn’t touch them. The tubes were frozen at minus-80 degrees centigrade (minus-112 Fahrenheit).

“It’s the RNA isolated from the retina tissue,” Yutz said.

Call it what you will, that was a piece of Thomas Gray, her son.

Ross Gray has long supported his wife’s journey.

“It helped her get over the loss,” he said. “It was part of the healing process, seeing that there’s still research going on five years after. His life was worthwhile. He’s brought a lot of good to the world.”

“The way I see it,” Sarah Gray said, “our son got into Harvard, Duke, and Penn. He has a job. He is relevant to the world. I only hope my life can be as relevant.”

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/20150329_Thomas_Gray_lived_six_days__but_his_life_has_lasting_impact.html#ASIBfjvkMHBMos7Y.99

NEW HOPE FOR SOLDIERS DISFIGURED IN WAR

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 8, 2014 at 11:08 am
face-of-hope

Stem cells as part of every treatment protocol
What if stem cells could be used in conjunction with other treatments and in doing so, make the impossible, possible?  Well…they are starting to.  “Army surgeon Robert Hale is leading the charge to make facial reconstruction medicine ready for the wounds of 21st-century war.”

A great deal of scientific and anecdotal evidence substantiate that stem cells are a seemingly limitless potential cure-all and one of the greatest medical advancements known to man.  While the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy when utilized as an isolated therapy is virtually undeniable, the full extent of stem cells’ healing potential is even more awe-inspiring.  Stem cells can potentially become complements to thousands of other treatments due to:

  • their regenerative capabilities
  • their flexibility
  • the fact that they are part of the body’s natural healing system

Stem cells have been used successfully to reduce symptoms and alleviate the suffering of hundreds of conditions previously believed to be incurable and they are often best utilized in isolation.  In fact, many stem cell doctors believe they work best when manipulated or modified as little as possible.  On the other hand, they have shown great success when used with other treatment protocols.  The oldest example is the 6 decades of stem cell use in the form of Bone Marrow Transplants and in coordination with chemo to mitigate Leukemia, Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas and other blood cancers.  When used with an “other” effective treatment, the result is often greater than the sum of the parts as the stem cells contribute to the healing potential of the “other” protocol.

In the article below, Army surgeon Robert Hale combines multiple techniques and protocols with stem cell therapy with a patient whose injuries were so severe, they were arranging organ donation.  This “protocol stacking” of cutting edge facial reconstruction, cutting edge stem cell therapy, superclavicle flap grafting from 1917 and other techniques allowed him to accomplish what was previously impossible.  .

Used alone, stem cells have a proven history of success as the “this changes everything” element in regenerative medicine and modern healing.

Used in conjunction with other established protocols or with new technologies, stem cells may very well change everything we have come to expect from modern medicine.

By the way, we saw this coming 3 years ago in DAMN! SILENCE OF THE LAMBS MEETS STEM CELLS!

SILENCE OF THE LAMBS MEETS STEM CELLS and future transplant recipients win big!!  Remember in Silence of the Lambs, at the end of the movie, when Hannibal Lechter cuts off the guards face and then wears it out to escape?  It turns out, if he had some stem cells to go with that face transplant, he could have just kept on wearing it.  Surgical researchers did exactly that on four dogs and all 4 of the dogs tolerated the face transplants for over one year without immunosuppressive drugs after the first month.

New Hope for Soldiers Disfigured in War

Army surgeon Robert Hale is leading the charge to make facial reconstruction medicine ready for the wounds of 21st-century war.

Col. Robert Hale shows a prototype of a mask that would speed healing and help prevent infection in treatment of facial injuries in soldiers. The design and function of the biomask has evolved as Hale has worked with research teams at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio…

http://discovermagazine.com/2014/sept/11-face-of-hope

STEM CELLS ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 21, 2014 at 4:38 pm

The potential of stem cells to regrow and/or prevent the deterioration of muscle and bone cells over time when subjected to zero gravity has garnered an enormous amount of interest from NASA and the entire space travel industry.   This has lead NASA to send stem cells into space to be researched in low or zero gravity on the space station.   The findings are extraordinary.  “The team discovered that 64 percent of the proteins found in the stem cells grown in simulated microgravity were not in control samples. In particular, the bioreactor cells contained several proteins involved in the breakdown of bone and in the regulation of calcium, neither type of which were found in stem cells grown in regular, Earth gravity.” 

We’ve know for some time that stem cells are smart and capable of:

  • differentiating into whatever cell types are needed without direction
  • growing every cell in a heart and organizing those cells perfectly into where they need to be
  • retro-differentiate into other cell types after finishing work on a particular organ or tissue type
  • traveling back through the umbilical cord from fetus in womb to mother with heart disease to aid the mother in the healing process
  • and many more incredible capabilities

But those actions took place in the patient’s body where the stem cells are able to read the needs of the body with the help of  numerous cues, messenger cells and the entire physiological road map of the patient to guide them.   Essentially, they have an awesome GPS system and just have to follow the directions they are given on roads the GPS “knows” very well.  Conversely, the astro-stem cells (stem cell-nauts?) are able to grow better in space than on earth and to grow with “space relevant capabilities.”  This is incredible.  Imagine going to space for the first time and knowing intrinsically what to do and further, knowing what to do to help your host body better survive and thrive in the conditions of space.  The astro-stem cells are taking cues from their external environment from factors they have never even been exposed to (unless you adhere to the ancient aliens theories) and modifying their proteins and genetic make up to accommodate for the difference in gravity.

What else can they do? If we assume the stem cells will react to the external cues as well as the internal cues, what other factors will they respond to?  We know they grow better in space and in a hyperbaric chamber; what type of response would they have to being underground, on the ocean or under it (long submarine voyages or sub-oceanic colonization), in the dark (increased optic nerve proliferation?), in radioactive areas (radiation resistance)?  Time will tell.  I would say the sky is the limit but apparently, it’s not.

Are we witnessing evolution?
evo·lu·tion  noun \ˌe-və-ˈlü-shən, ˌē-və-\ biology : a theory that the differences between modern plants and animals are because of changes that happened by a natural process over a very long time.  the process by which changes in plants and animals happen over time, a process of slow change and development

No.  Not evolution.  This is faster than the classic definition of evolution.  This is accelerated and positive mutation as a response to external and internal environmental factors.   This is…adaption, rapid adaption…”  Lending support to my analogy that stem cells are born Marines because “Marines are taught to adapt, improvise, overcome…” via

…and the line between science fiction and science reality grows ever thinner.
– David

Growing-stem-cells-in-space

Growing stem cells in space: Medicine’s next big thing

“When challenged by microgravity, living organisms’ genes can ‘turn on,’ transforming growth. Scientists at Zero Gravity Solutions work to direct cells toward healthier, hardier strains. It’s not genetic engineering, but accelerated hybridization.” via http://www.space.com/21885-stem-cells-in-space-can-solve-plant-and-animal-problems-video.html

Date:
March 31, 2014
Source:
Ivanhoe / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Currently, treatments for hemorrhagic stroke aim to control swelling but not regeneration of the damaged tissue. Now, researchers are using an out of this world idea to help stroke survivors. Video provided by Ivanhoe

http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/58f619e8b7a37890f1857c84110e7e91.htm

RELATED/SOURCES:

Welcome to the CASIS Request for Proposals

The Impact of Microgravity on Fundamental Stem Cell Properties:

A Call for Spaceflight and Ground-Based Experiments

– See more at: http://www.iss-casis.org/Opportunities/Solicitations/RFPStemCellsResearch.aspx#sthash.Y6sDtvQa.dpuf

Welcome to the CASIS Request for Proposals

The Impact of Microgravity on Fundamental Stem Cell Properties:

A Call for Spaceflight and Ground-Based Experiments

– See more at: http://www.iss-casis.org/Opportunities/Solicitations/RFPStemCellsResearch.aspx#sthash.Y6sDtvQa.dpuf

 

Angel Di Maria gets stem cells for World Cup final

In ALL ARTICLES, CELEBRITIES & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 8, 2014 at 11:07 am

Angel di Maria now joins the ranks of professional athletes who turned to stem cell treatments for healing from injury or performance enhancement.  This long list includes such notables as Peyton Manning, Bartolo Colon, Jarvis Green, Kobe Bryant, Andrew Bynum, Tiger Woods (if you believe the rumors) and many more.

 

Atletico Madrid Barcelona Real Madrid Athletic Bilbao Sevilla Villarreal Real Sociedad Valencia Celta Vigo Levante Malaga Rayo Vallecano Getafe Espanyol Granada Elche Almeria Deportivo La Coruña Eibar Córdoba

2014 World Cup / News

Angel Di Maria to undergo stem cell treatment to play the 2014 World Cup final

by Tom Conn | Posted on Monday, July 7th, 2014

Argentine international winger, Angel Di Maria suffered a torn right hamstring in Friday’s 1-0 win over Belgium and despite being ruled out of action for the remainder of the tournament, Di Maria Is undergoing stem-cell treatment in hopes of making the 2014 World Cup final next weekend.

DiMaria

According to Spanish sports daily, AS, Di Maria is so determined to join his teammates, should they reach the World Cup final, that he has decided to undergo stem cell treatment, similar to that used by Diego Costa ahead of the Champions League final, in order to fight for football’s grandest prize.

The medical procedure is used to regenerate damaged cells using the patient’s own healthy cells, with the primary object being to reduce inflammation and repair the torn muscle tissue.

In addition to the treatment, Di Maria will also undergo the standard treatment for this injury; ice, kinesiology, electro pulse stimulation and some rehabilitation exercises in the swimming pool.

LATE STAGE OVARIAN CANCER CURED WITH STEM CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on July 7, 2014 at 1:03 pm

ovarian-cancer-symptoms
Hue Hospital Succeeds in Treating Cancer with Stem Cell

Saigon – Doctors of Hue Central Hospital have used stem cell transplantation to successfully treat a cancer patient of the last stage. The Hue Central Hospital announced on June 26 that its doctors have cured Le Thi Sau, 52, who was suffering ovarian cancer in the last stage, with stem cell transplant. The operation is the success of the scientific project “Using stem cell in breast cancer and cervical cancer” managed by Professor Nguyen Duy Thang, deputy head of the hospital. Adult stem cells have been used to treat certain cancers through bone marrow transplants. In this therapy, the stem cells that give rise to the different blood cells in the body are transplanted into the bone marrow of the patient, where they regenerate the blood. The project was given green light to carry out in the Hue Central Hospital by the Ministry of Science and Technology. Professor Nguyen Duy Thang said the success of this method will pave the way for next operations on breast and ovarian cancer patients. In the time ahead, the hospital continues to treat two other cancer female patients with the stem cell treatment. It is hoped that the treatment will save many cancer patients. (www.saigon-gpdaily.com.vn June 27)

DO ADULT STEM CELLS CAUSE CANCER?

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on July 1, 2014 at 4:31 pm

NO!

cancer-free-zone

What do you get when you add 1,100 ADULT STEM CELL PATIENTS studied over 5 years,

plus another 1,873 ADULT STEM CELL PATIENTS studied over an average 12.5 years,

plus another ~7,000 ADULT STEM CELL PATIENTS in studies and FDA clinical trials data?

~10,000 ADULT STEM CELL TREATMENT PATIENTS showing NO CANCER!

 

“A total of 1873 patients were treated from 1990 to 2006 with bone marrow-derived concentrated cells. Patients were monitored for cancer incidence from the date of the first operation (1990) until death, or until December 31, 2011. The mean follow-up time was 12.5 years (range, five to twenty-two years)…No tumor formation was found at the treatment sites on the 7306 magnetic resonance images and 52,430 radiographs among the 1873 patients…This study found no increased cancer risk in patients after application of autologous cell-based therapy using bone marrow-derived stromal progenitor cells either at the treatment site or elsewhere in the patients after an average follow-up period of 12.5 years.

The upshot? This most recent study, as well as others, FDA clinical trials data, and the data we have published now amounts to about 10,000 patients who have been treated with adult stem cells and extensively tracked for this issue. There is no evidence that adult stem cells cause cancer. There is no rational reason for the fear, other than a completely different type of cell (ESC) that happens to have a similar name (stem cell) can cause teratomas – hence the confusion!”

Tumors, cancers and teratomas may result from Embryonic stem cell (ESC) treatments or Induced Pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) treatments

but NOT FROM ADULT STEM CELL TREATMENTS.

Sources:

RADIATION AND CANCER (MUST READ)

In ALL ARTICLES, DISEASE INFO on June 29, 2014 at 12:23 pm

RADIATION AND CANCER (MUST READ)

radiotherapy_malignancy

“Researchers from the Department of Radiation Oncology at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report that radiation treatment TRANSFORMS CANCER CELLS INTO TREATMENT-RESISTANT BREAST CANCER STEM CELLS, even as it kills half of all tumor cells.”

“…In some cases, CANCER STEM CELLS ARE GENERATED by the therapy…”

“… if tumors are challenged by certain stressors that threaten them (such as radiation), they generate iBCSCs that may, along with surviving cancer stem cells, PRODUCE MORE TUMORS…”

For more info: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/study-radiation-therapy-can-make-cancers-30x-more-malignant
Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.27701/full

A SIGHT FOR SORE EYES

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on June 28, 2014 at 1:45 pm

20140628-143215-52335093.jpg
A Sight for Sore Eyes
Author: Sarah Hoffman

“Researchers have grown part of an eye in a lab dish, using a type of stem cell made from a piece of skin.

They said the little retina started growing and developing on its own — an important step towards creating custom-tailored organs in the lab.”

Earlier this month scientists successfully created a functioning human retina using iPSCs (induced pluripotent stem cells). But that’s not the cool part. What’s actually amazing is that they did very little to make this happen.

Wait what?! Ok let me explain. These researchers took some of these cells from a tiny little piece of human skin, basically rewound time as far as these cells are concerned and pushed them back to a more-or-less embryonic state, sent signals to some genes manipulating them to form a retina, and then let it do it’s thing. And it was a success! This little retina is living in a dish just sensing light and being a badass little organ. Even the scientists didn’t realize this would happen so naturally

STEM CELLS HIT MAIN STREAM MEDIA!

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 27, 2014 at 9:03 pm

STEM CELLS HIT MAIN STREAM MEDIA! 
On NBC tonight at 8pm EST!

The first stem cell generated windpipe was implanted in 2008.
Six long years later, the technique has been improved significantly and has hit main stream media. 

Image

“Macchiarini’s team began by collecting stem cells from Beyene’s bone marrow. Those cells were mixed with special growth factors and then poured onto a scaffold made from plastic — in fact, the very same plastic that is used to make soda bottles — which had been made to mimic the shape of a real windpipe.  In just a matter of days, the scaffold began to transform into an actual functioning windpipe.”

Some attack those pushing the boundaries, citing that the surgery is experimental and unproven.  But the Dr can’t stand by as patients die when he can do something about it and can’t ignore their pleas for a chance at the hope of recovery.  This is cutting edge of medicine and there are thousands of clinical trials and studies and 10s to 100s of thousands of patients treated, most outside of the US.  There are no guarantees.  There are always risks, even with rigorously tested pharmaceutical drugs and treatment protocols that have been used for decades.  But for chronic and terminal patients who are given no chance for recovery, experimental sounds like a pretty great option.

Historically, new treatments have always been met with resistance.

“Tom Starzl, when he started doing liver transplants, the first seven, eight, nine patients all died. Everybody said he was nuts, OK? Christian Barnard, when he started doing heart transplants, everyone threw rocks at him. This is how we’re going to treat diseases in the future and this is the start of it.”

Anything which pushes the envelop of contemporary knowledge will be rejected by those clinging to traditional concepts…but without pioneering doctors and even more pioneering patients, willing to take risks, medical protocols can not advance.  I salute the doctor and the patients who are the ground-breaking pioneers in the new land of regenerative medicine.  And what can their mutual risk do for the patient and millions to follow?

“One of Macchiarini’s most promising success stories is Claudia Castillo, a Spanish mother who is doing so well six years after her transplant that an increasing number of Macchiarini’s colleagues are beginning to see him in a new light.”

Thank you!

To watch the video and learn more:

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/leap-faith-desperate-patients-look-lab-grown-organs-n142036

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