DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘cardiac’

ADULT STEM CELL EVOLUTION AT A GLANCE

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 16, 2014 at 11:03 am

“Beginning in about 1990, the treatment of cardiovascular disease experienced major conceptual expansions through the application of new therapeutic paradigms targeted to angiogenesis and tissue healing. Initial strategies involved administering proteins involved in healing processes, then the genes that encoded them, and then, by the end of the decade, the use of stem cells to better achieve these objectives.” -‘Stem Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease: Past Obstacles and Promising New Directions‘, genengnews.com

Stem Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease: Past Obstacles and Promising New Directions

Adult Stem Cell Evolution At A Glance
Author: Sarah Hoffman

I know many people think that what we know about stem cells is all we have ever known. This is a misconception arising from the fact that people in the United States do not discuss the topic because it could be considered a political no-no-topic. In reality, many scientists from all over the earth research adult stem cells and are finding ways to use them that was never before imaginable. They are also perfecting ways in which we use them to treat patience with varying ailments. This article focuses on cardiovascular diseases.

Scientists began by trying varying methods of stem cell treatment, from utilizing many different types of cells at a time to using very specific cells. Through many studies and trial and error, scientists found that intravenous injection of stem cells to treat many cardiac ailments was effective, efficient, and affordable.

So it seems to me that a routine stem cell treatment may soon be available to cardiac patients.

Take a gander at the whole article and I know some more of your questions are sure to be answered!

Advertisements

REAL LIFE FIGHT CLUB… KIND OF

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on July 9, 2014 at 3:01 pm

Real Life Fight Club… Kind Of
Author: Sarah Hoffman

“Many patients with heart problems – such as heart disease or angina – may need to undergo cardiac surgery in order to restore or improve blood flow. But a new study suggests that the procedure may offer so much more; stem cells in fat discarded during cardiac surgery could be injected back into the patient’s heart to further improve its function.” – Beyond the Dish ‘Heart Function Improved by Injecting Discarded Surgery Fat’

So it looks like Tyler Durden (from Fight Club) was right… kind of. There is a better use for that unwanted, liposuctioned belly fat than just being toxic waste. Scientists have discovered that the belly fat that many of us have (that we really don’t want or need) can be used to improve the functionality of our hearts. This procedure would require liposuction pre-cardiac-surgery, however, scientists are looking into the possibility of using similar fat that builds up around the heart that, conveniently, is removed during the surgery anyway. Wam-Bam-Thank you ma’am

This seems only too fitting, as many young people experiencing cardiac distress may be experiencing it because they have a good amount of this fat to spare. Well, fret no more, because what doesn’t kill us does make us stronger.

All jokes aside this does seem like the circle of life modernized. The fat that could be killing us can be used to save us once it has already begun to kill us. Make sense? No? Well think of it this way… While surgeons are inside of someone’s chest trying to save them from a heart attack, they are also removing excess fat from around the heart– which is part of the reason this person is in this situation to begin with. In the near future doctors may be able to, in one surgery, remove this fat, isolate the stem cells, and inject them back into the heart to have a positive effect post surgery. This could increase blood flow out of the left ventricle and result in “greater ventricular movement”. So the fat that is hurting our heart can now be removed and the stem cells in it put back with basically the opposite effect it had originally. But in the mean time, it seems very likely that we will be able to save some of that liposuctioned fat and use it during cardiac surgery to improve heart function.

Pretty futuristic if you ask me. It’s also nice to know that Tyler Durden wasn’t completely crazy… kind of.

For more on why fat is awesome check THIS out

STEM CELLS FIX HEART 5 YEARS AGO

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 17, 2013 at 9:18 am

AN UPDATE ON JAMES 11/17/2013

 “i have been doing manual labor with my dads company the heart is doing well im getting in better shape every week.

im to the piont now i can carry 5 gallon buckets of concrete up hills lol, pretty cool still
in a few days it will be my 6 year anniversary and still no reversion!!”
success

2006

Case Study: James Eilert, 34 years old, presents with a “widowmaker” [100 % blockage of the left ascending coronary artery]. His ejection fraction (EF – volume of blood his heart pumps out) was between 20 and 25 percent (55 is normal). His cardiologist told him he has about 5 years left to live.  James left the country in order to receive Adult Stem Cell treatment.

1 1/2 weeks after treatment – Echocardiogram revealed that his completely dead apex was beating again.

6 months after treatment – Sidewalls of heart beat normally.  Septum went from 100% damage to 30% damage. Cardiologist confirms James’ heart is 50 percent more elastic than the year before Repair Stem Cell therapy.

6 – 9 months after treatment – James’ total dead heart tissue is down to about 10%.  EF is up to 50%!

4 years later – James’ heart and health continue to improve. He continues to push himself and his limits.  He runs regularly, works 7 days a week and can bike 20 miles .

Summation:

James went from Class III congestive heart failure to Class I with an ejection fraction (EF) increase from ~20-25% to his current EF of 50%.  His doctors have lifted all restrictions and limitations on his physical activities.

James is only one of many adult stem cell treatment success stories…

November 17, 2011 Update:

A letter from James.  How is he doing today?

“its amazing how fast reality can change, the differences that you see in others that they dont notice themselves. the changes in attitudes and perceptions that the “new” was never in doubt and is accepted as if it were always true. the new studies showing the truth about adult stem cell heart treatments the last few months have proven that we the few pioneers that have made huge financial sacrifices to try and save our lives were not crazy, stupid or otherwise deluded!

it was a risk and for the last four years despite proving over and over by running uphill on so many treadmills my improvments were basically ignored by cardiologists, general practitioners, and even my own wife and stepdaughters.

that i am happy to say has changed!!!!

i went to see my doctor yesterday, he told me to start heavy weight training and interval running, to help me lose weight better. what was differnet? nobody has told me to do that since my heart attack, there was no mention of taking it easy, in fact before i was told to only do light weights and take it easy, watch my heart rate, dont push past 150bpm ever.

it was like i never even had a heart attack.

i asked in disbelief if i should watch my heart rate, keep it a safe zone. the answer “no, stick to 85 to 90 percent and youll be fine, your exercise scores and echos show you can handle it”

vindication, no longer an unexplained anamoly, just a patient that responded better than average to a new treatment – like it was always true in thier minds, never a doubt.

what a feeling!! it has taken ten years to go from the “fringe” to the mainstream – i look forward to getting treatments here in america, and i’m so happy i took the risk that now ensures i will be alive to reap the benifits when it becomes available here!

have a good day david – it nice to be right once in a while!
jim eilert

Congratulations as always Jim!  On your heart recovery success and on having the courage to be a pioneer with an adult stem cell treatment that was cutting edge around the world 5 years ago and is still barely know today in the USA! – David

HEARTS BEING REPAIRED THROUGH STEM CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 5, 2013 at 9:00 am

xray_1834547c

Scientists Are Rebuilding Hearts With Stem Cells

Every two minutes someone in the UK has a heart attack.

Every six minutes, someone dies from heart failure.

During an attack, the heart remodels itself and dilates around the site of the injury to try to compensate, but these repairs are rarely effective. If the attack does not kill you, heart failure later frequently will.  “No matter what other clinical interventions are available, heart transplantation is the only genuine cure for this,” says Paul Riley, professor of regenerative medicine at Oxford University. “The problem is there is a dearth of heart donors.”  Transplants have their own problems – successful operations require patients to remain on toxic, immune-suppressing drugs for life and their subsequent life expectancies are not usually longer than 20 years.  The solution, emerging from the laboratories of several groups of scientists around the world, is to work out how to rebuild damaged hearts. Their weapons of choice are reprogrammed stem cells.

These researchers have rejected the more traditional path of cell therapy that you may have read about over the past decade of hope around stem cells – the idea that stem cells could be used to create batches of functioning tissue (heart or brain or whatever else) for transplant into the damaged part of the body.  Instead, these scientists are trying to understand what the chemical and genetic switches are that turn something into a heart cell or muscle cell. Using that information, they hope to program cells at will, and help the body make repairs.

It is an exciting time for a technology that no one thought possible a few years ago. In 2007, Shinya Yamanaka showed it was possible to turn adult skin cells into embryonic-like stem cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), using just a few chemical factors.

His technique radically advanced stem cell biology, sweeping aside years of blockages due to the ethical objections about using stem cells from embryos. He won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for his work in October. Researchers have taken this a step further – directly turning one mature cell type to another without going through a stem cell phase.

At Oxford, Riley has spent almost a year setting up a lab to work out how to get heart muscle to repair itself. The idea is to expand the scope of the work that got Riley into the headlines last year after a high-profile paper published in the journal Nature in which he showed a means of repairing cells damaged during a heart attack in mice. That work involved in effect turning the clock back in a layer of cells on the outside of the heart, called the epicardium, making adult cells think they were embryos again and thereby restarting their ability to repair.

During the development of the embryo, the epicardium turns into the many types of cells seen in the heart and surrounding blood vessels. After the baby is born this layer of cells loses its ability to transform. By infusing the epicardium with the protein thymosin β4 (Tβ4), Riley’s team found the once-dormant layer of cells was able to produce new, functioning heart cells. Overall, the treatment led to a 25% improvement in the mouse heart’s ability to pump blood after a month compared with mice that had not received the treatment.

Riley says finding ways to replace damaged cells via transplantation, the dominant research idea for more than a decade, has faltered. Scientists have tried out a variety of adult stem cells – derived from areas such as bone marrow, muscle and fat – turned them into heart cells and transplanted them into animal models, which initially showed good results.  But those results could never be repeated in humans with the same degree of success. “In humans, moving into clinical trials, the actual benefit, from a meta-analysis just on bone-marrow-derived cells, is a meagre 3% improvement,” he says. “That’s barely detectable clinically and unfortunately isn’t going to make a vast amount of difference to your overall quality of life.”  The original impression from rodent studies was that the transplanted cells would become new muscle and contribute to improving damaged areas, but Riley says that idea has fallen out of favour. “All they do, if anything at all, is to secrete factors that will help the heart sustain the injury, rather than necessarily offer long-term regeneration.”

That is where the reprogrammers get going. Find the chemical factors that will make a cell (a skin cell, say, or a piece of scar tissue) think it is in the womb, so it switches certain genes on and others off and becomes a new heart cell, and you can avoid the large-scale transplant altogether. All you need is an infusion of the right drugs and resident cells will do all the required repair work.

The process requires an understanding of how an embryo develops and what cues nature uses to grow all the body’s cell types from just a sperm and an egg. This ability to regenerate does not quite stop at birth: injure a one-day-old mouse’s heart, for example, and it will completely regenerate. Injure it again after a week and the heart will scar. “Within seven days, it goes from completely repairable to the adult wound-healing default position,” says Riley. “We want to understand what happens during that window.”

Many scientists believe the secrets of how to regenerate tissue are linked with an understanding of how to reverse the ageing process. Saul Villeda, of the University of California, presented work at the recent annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in New Orleans where he showed that blood from young mice reversed some of the effects of ageing in older mice, improving learning and memory to a level comparable with much younger animals. Older mice had an increased number of stem cells in their brains and there was a 20% increase in connections between brain cells.

Though his work is yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, Villeda speculated the young blood was likely to be working in the older mice by increasing levels of chemical factors that tend to decline as animals get older. Bring these back, he says, and “all of a sudden you have all of these plasticity and learning and memory-related genes that are coming back”.

Prof Deepak Srivastava has already transformed scar-forming cardiac cells in mice into beating heart cells, inside living animals, using a set of chemical factors. His results were published last April in Nature.  “We’ve redeployed nature’s own toolkit in these cells to convert non-muscle cells that are in the heart into new muscle. More than half of the cells in the heart are not muscle [but] architectural cells called fibroblasts that are meant to support the muscle,” he says.

“We had the idea that if we could somehow fool those cells into thinking that they should become muscle, then we have a vast reservoir of cells that already exist within the organ that might be able to be called upon to regenerate the heart from within.”

He injected three chemical factors – called Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5, collectively known as GMT – into the damaged region of a heart and, within a month, the non-beating cells that normally ended up becoming scar tissue had become functioning heart cells that had integrated with their neighbors.  “The factors get taken up by the fibroblasts and the non-muscle population of cells and they initiate a genome-wide switch of the program of the cells so that it now begins to activate thousands of muscle-specific genes and it turns off thousands of fibroblast genes.”

Srivastava’s direct reprogramming technique takes Yamanaka’s work further because it allows scientists to turn one type of cell into another without having to go through a stem cell phase in between, thus reducing the risk that any future therapy might induce cancer.  The method has been proven to work, so far only in Petri dishes, for blood, liver and brain cells. “Ultimately, as we learn enough about each cell type, it’s likely we might be able to make most cell types in the body with this direct reprogramming approach,” he says.

The tough task for all these scientists – from those working specifically on the heart such as Riley to those working more generally on all cell types such as Srivastava – is to identify and catalogue the thousands of chemical factors that are at work in the various stages of cell development, and that are the keys to the transformation of one cell into another.

“We’re trying to do the same experiments we did in the heart in the pig’s heart because it is very similar in size and physiology to human hearts. If it works there and it is safe, then we’d be ready for a human clinical trial,” says Srivastava.

www.businessinsider.com

STRANGERS STEM CELLS REPAIR HEART MUSCLE

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 5, 2012 at 8:54 pm

English: Solution to repair heart muscle using...

Study: Stem cells from strangers can repair hearts

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Researchers are reporting a key advance in using stem cells to repair hearts damaged by heart attacks. In a study, stem cells donated by strangers proved as safe and effective as patients’ own cells for helping restore heart tissue.

The work involved just 30 patients in Miami and Baltimore, but it proves the concept that anyone’s cells can be used to treat such cases. Doctors are excited because this suggests that stem cells could be banked for off-the-shelf use after heart attacks, just as blood is kept on hand now.

Results were discussed Monday at an American Heart Association conference in California and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study used a specific type of stem cells from bone marrow that researchers believed would not be rejected by recipients. Unlike other cells, these lack a key feature on their surface that makes the immune system see them as foreign tissue and attack them, explained the study’s leader, Dr. Joshua Hare of the University of Miami.

The patients in the study had suffered heart attacks years earlier, some as long as 30 years ago. All had developed heart failure because the scar tissue from the heart attack had weakened their hearts so much that they grew large and flabby, unable to pump blood effectively.

Researchers advertised for people to supply marrow, which is removed using a needle into a hip bone. The cells were taken from the marrow and amplified for about a month in a lab at Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University, then returned to Miami to be used for treatment, which did not involve surgery.

The cells were delivered through a tube pushed through a groin artery into the heart near the scarred area. Fifteen patients were given cells from their own marrow and 15 others, cells from strangers.

About a year later, scar tissue had been reduced by about one-third. Both groups had improvements in how far they could walk and in quality of life. There was no significant difference in one measure of how well their hearts were able to pump blood, but doctors hope these patients will continue to improve over time, or that refinements in treatment will lead to better results.

The big attraction is being able to use cells supplied by others, with no blood or tissue matching needed.

“You could have the cells ready to go in the blood bank so when the patient comes in for a therapy — there’s no delay,” Hare said. “It’s also cheaper to make the donor cells,” and a single marrow donor can supply enough cells to treat as many as 10 people.

Dr. Elliott Antman of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who heads the heart conference, praised the work.

“That opens up an entire new avenue for stem cell therapy, like a sophisticated version of a blood bank,” he said. There’s an advantage in not having to create a cell therapy for each patient, and it could spare them the pain and wait of having their own marrow harvested, he said.

The study was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Hare owns stock in a biotech company working on a treatment using a mixture of cells.

Juan Lopez received his own cells in the study, and said it improved his symptoms so much that at age 70, he was able to return to his job as an engineer and sales manager for a roofing manufacturer and ride an exercise bike.

“It has been a life-changing experience,” said Lopez, who lives in Miami. “I can feel day by day, week by week, month by month, my improvement. I don’t have any shortness of breath and my energy level is way up there. I don’t have any fluid in my lungs.

And, he said happily, “My sex drive has improved!”

Marilynn Marchione – Associated Press

http://news.yahoo.com/study-stem-cells-strangers-repair-hearts-205105872.html

Heart Association: http://www.heart.org

JAMA: http://www.jama.ama-assn.org

 

 

STEM CELLS – MAGIC OR SCIENCE?

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 26, 2012 at 11:28 am

 

A friend asked:

“I would like nothing more than to beleive adult stem cell working for different diseases, however I don’t. How can you take a sick cell and replant it and it becomes healthy.”

—————————————————————————

My answer:

HIGH TURNOVER RATE
This is not magic, it is biological fact. Let’s start with your body. “Just like us, cells grow old and die. When old cells die, new ones replace them. For example, a blood cell in our body lives for about 120 days. Another example is our skin cells. We shed our skin cells about every 35 days.” That’s the outer layer which is why tattoos fade over time and why tattoos go deep into the lower levels of skin.

I’M DYING! YES, WE ALL ARE…
So our cells are in a constant state of “getting older” or “getting sick” or moving towards “impaired function.” I’m dying says the soldier with the sucking chest wound. Yes, we all are, says his philosopher friend. And we are indeed. “He not busy being born is busy dying.” says Bob Dylan. Perhaps this is too philosophical but the point is this: our body and every one of the 5-50 trillion cells is either getting older and weaker and dying or is currently being born or repaired. It’s a dynamic entity, this shell we reside in and it is constantly changing.

GETTING DOWN WITH THE SICKNESS
If you have too many cells with impaired function, especially in a specific area, which are damaged, necrotic, not getting enough nutrients, minerals etc and are getting exposure to too many toxins, inflammation, infections, etc which it can not eliminate, then something will go wrong and you will get sick with the capital ‘S’ and it is time to call in the workers to fix you up.

BOB THE BUILDER HAS SOME COMPETITION
Stem cells are the body’s construction workers. They do both renovations and they do ground up construction. Renovations amount to taking dead tissue and cells – necrotic – and re-energizing them so they come back to life (no zombie jokes please). This can be seen in hundreds of heart studies and trials and thousands of congestive heart failure patients where necrotic heart tissue implanted with stem cells was found to be living and beating a few weeks later. Ground up construction is where they set up shop on a blank field and build something new. This can be seen when stem cells create mini bypasses where stents were implanted. They are actually smart enough to know the “stent area” is a dangerous heavy traffic area and even if the stent is working, they will create offramps and onramps around the stent or bypasses with capillaries. Pretty cool huh?

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT
Not magic, just plain old science and if your body was able to produce enough stem cells to run to the heart, it could do it by itself. In fact, it is trying, desperately to do exactly that but the body in congestive heart failure is like a single mother with 6 kids, 3 jobs and 2 dogs standing on one foot and juggling chain saws. She just can’t do it all, she is stretched to the limits of her endurance, something has to give…and it does. So while your body is sending stem cells to the heart, and the feet and the pancreas, liver, kidney, brain, endocrine and lymphatic and circulatory system infrastructure, RIGHT NOW, to renovate and build new cells and tissues, it is not sending ENOUGH and the fact that our single mom smokes and lives near a factory and does other people’s laundries, exposing herself to multiple chemical toxins, doesn’t sleep much, can only afford McD’s and is highly stressed, etc etc just taxes her body all the more.

RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW
So YOU have stem cells in YOUR body RIGHT NOW which are running around, differentiating into different cell types and healing you. All the time. So while our bodies are in a constant state of degradation, our stem cells are constantly fighting that degradation.

WANT THE SCIENCE?
If you would like trials and studies to back this up there are about 2,600 at last count and I can refer you to some that address a specific condition.

 

microRNA – New Kid On The Block Has Journalistic Baggage

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 30, 2012 at 3:58 am

“Duke University researchers used molecules called microRNAs to convert scar tissue (called fibroblasts) into heart muscle cells in a living mouse”

That’s great! Unfortunately, the author of the article foolishly decided to pit “microRNA – The New Kid On The Block” against the decade long reigning champ, Adult Stem Cells…and he needs to get his story straight.

https://i1.wp.com/img2-3.timeinc.net/people/i/2008/news/080211/new_kids320.jpg

New Kids On The Block

From the start, the author presents almost no accurate information about adult stem cells, their decade of history, successes, studies, trials, patients treated, safety, efficacy and potency.  He is incredibly dated on the understanding of adult stem cells and straight up wrong/ignorant on many of his points.  His original 3 point comparison is to Embryonic stem cells, already shown to be far inferior to Adult Stem Cells in every way including their potency.  He then states Adult Stem Cells have: “…a limited capacity to form other types of cells” which is completely wrong. 

He then quotes the Duke University doctor, ‘The results of using these adult stem cells for tissue regeneration are “not as satisfying as one would like.” 

  • A. “not as satisfying as one would like.” is perhaps the most unscientific assessment I’ve ever heard 
  • B.  I’m surprised to hear this from the doctor as Duke University has had tremendous success utilizing stem cells in treating pediatric Cerebral Palsy/Ataxia 
  • C.  Would he be satisfied if there was a decade long history of cardiac tissue regeneration studies?  There is: https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/heart-disease-treatment/
  • D.  Would he be satisfied if you could grow an entire heart from scratch, from a patients’ own stem cells?  You can.

 

I suppose the author is not entirely to blame as the assertion within the peer reviewed article is completely erroneous as well: “this is the first report of direct cardiac reprogramming in vivo.”  Wrong!

I would further question whether microRNA cells are “smart” like adult stem cells are.  Gene therapy to turn heart muscle scar tissue into heart muscle is great but then you have a scar shaped piece of heart muscle.  Does it beat in perfect time with the rest of the heart muscle or is it asynchronous?  Can it grow an entirely new heart from scratch as adult stem cells can? (No, it can not)

An adult stem cell grows a cardiac cell from it’s proverbial birth and the cardiac cells conform from ‘birth’ and as they develop to the surrounding tissue and work in unison with the adjacent cells.  It would appear the microRNA transforms the scar tissue at a later stage of the cells growth.  This is then perhaps an “older cell” with it’s own inherent programming and limitations. Prone to it’s own agenda, these doppelganger heart cells may cause conflicts with the existing cells and the rest of the heart muscle.

Just changing scar to muscle is only a fraction of what stem cells can do.  “Smart” adult stem cells will build the cells needed, put them in the places they are needed, create valves where valves are needed, capillaries if those are needed, bring dead heart tissue back to life and then some will migrate down to the pancreas and heal that as well.

microRNA gene therapy may have a long future of success and I am sure there are some applications which they will be great.  To compare them to adult stem cells in the context of regenerative medicine as the author has done, especially without a proper understanding of the safety and efficacy record of adult stem cells, especially in the field of cardiac regenerative medicine which has a decade long history (the longest of all practical and clinical research), is like bringing a rubber knife to a gun fight.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/lT2o7kiwAL_5VRXei7P4mtmkdYxYKsbhQC6BVmz4Gg6PiEgLlJ_M7OlePEjikpYkgyUb_FivPx7bancKQlSZf1s3J_idaT_abiADBmruCRf2FWzB0A

Repairing the heart without using stem cells

By Alex Crees Published April 27, 2012 FoxNews.com

  • stem cell

When a person suffers a heart attack, scar tissue forms over the damaged areas of the heart, reducing the organ’s function.  However, in a recent study, scientists successfully turned this scar tissue into working heart muscle without the use of stem cells.

Duke University researchers used molecules called microRNAs to convert scar tissue (called fibroblasts) into heart muscle cells in a living mouse, improving the heart’s ability to pump blood.

According to the scientists, this process is much simpler than stem cell transplants and has none of the ethical concerns, making it a potential turning point in the science of tissue regeneration.

“Right now, there’s no good evidence stem cells can do the job,” senior author Dr. Victor Dzau, a James B. Duke professor of medicine and chancellor of health affairs at Duke University, told FoxNews.com.

Scientists believe embryonic stem cells are the best to use for tissue regeneration because they are pluripotent—meaning they can become any type of cell in the body.  However, Dzau said there have not been enough experiments done to prove how functional the stem cells are in regenerating tissues and whether or not they may form deadly tumors.

Additionally, there are ethical concerns about using cells derived from a human embryo, he said.

Meanwhile, adult stem cells avoid the controversy surrounding embryonic stem cells but have a limited capacity to form other types of cells.  The results of using these adult stem cells for tissue regeneration are “not as satisfying as one would like,” Dzau said.

Rather than stem cells, the new method developed by Dzau’s team uses microRNA molecules—which typically control gene activity—and delivers them into the scar tissue that develops after a heart attack.  The microRNAs are able to reprogram, or trick, the scar tissue into becoming heart muscle again instead.

Testing is still in its early stages, but so far, the method appears to be relatively easy, and the data looks very promising, according to the researchers.

“It’s a much simplified, feasible way of causing regeneration; very easy to use as therapy,” Dzau said.  “With stem cells, you have to take them from the embryo or tissue in the body, grow them in culture, and re-inject them—and then there can be technical and biological problems.

“With microRNA, after a heart attack you can simply convert some of the fibroblasts and tell them to become the right cell type and regenerate,” he said.

The method also has the potential to treat stroke, spinal cord injuries, chronic conditions such as heart disease—and even the normal damage that can come with aging.  It can feasibly be used for any type of organ in the body, though the process of converting the cells may be different for each organ.

“Right now, our work is proof of concept,” Dzau said, adding that the method must still be tested in then larger animals, and if successful there, it can move onto human clinical trials.  “But one could think about all these things of possibilities.  Could you use it to treat the disease of aging and losing brain cells?  Can you convert other cells in the brain to working brain cells?

“It’s a significant finding because it changes the way we think about regenerating tissues,” Dzau said.  “It breaks open a whole new area.”

The study was funded in part by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and published Thursday in the journal Circulation Research.

WHY IS THE USA SO DAMN BEHIND? HAVE A HEART

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 12, 2012 at 1:31 pm

My buddy David S. is raising funds for stem cell treatment for his heart.  He is a gentleman, a poet, a musician and he always seems to get right to the meat of the subject.  David asks:

What was the method used to develop [adult stem cell] therapies all over the world in other countries? Clinical trials?

————————————————–

Excellent question!

Short answer: American medical professionals are so Ameri-centric, they throw away or ignore anything (studies, trials, etc) conducted outside the USA.

I remember a few years ago, an acquaintance of mine who was pre-med sneered at my mention of any trials conducted outside the US and then sneered at the very thought of adult stem cells doing anything.  Well, I guess I’m laughing last but I brought up the point then that his arrogance was somewhat confusing to me since the USA health system is ranked 37th in the world by the World Health Organization.  What the hell was he so proud of??

HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED…

in 2005 the first stem cell treatment facility was created in Thailand where the environment was favorable (the king’s cardio thoracic surgeon was a fan of stem cells for heart disease) and theIr methods were based on half a decade of human research preceded by years and years of animal research. I present a short list of the ‘ignored’ studies below.  Read through and you will realize:

a. by the time these studies were published, everyone in the scientifically community new the results for a year or years and

b. by the time the Bangkok facility was created, Prof Doris Taylor was already creating hearts with stem cells from scratch

c. these studies and trials, when conducted outside the US, have been all but ignored and then repeated in the US. The inevitable successful trial results 6-8 years later in the US are always accompanied by an incorrect, ignorant and infuriating news article crying: “first ever in the world!”

d.  in addition to the studies/trials below, there were also hundreds or thousands of other studies showing the safety and efficacy of adult stem cell treatments in animals and humans in other organs/parts of the body.

[While, ‘it worked there, so it will work here’ is not an accepted scientific method, at some point there is an increase in confidence when you realize: adult stem cells are in the body to repair, that’s what they do, they are safe, they fix stuff, now let’s figure out how to maximize there effects.]

For more information: https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/heart-disease-treatment/

HEART DISEASE CLINICAL STUDIES – A BRIEF HISTORY

2002

A clinical trial led by Dr. Hans Dohmann plus six colleagues in Brazil took 21 transplant candidates and gave 14 of them bone marrow cells. The results were so spectacular that the American Heart Association accepted the paper and it was presented in 2003. Five of the seven in the control group opted in to make a total of 19 stem cell transplants. The mortality rate for transplant candidates is about 35% per year. At that rate there would be, of those 19, only 2.2 patients still alive without a transplant after five years. There were, in fact, 12 alive as of Dec. 31, 2007; more than five years down the road.

If you did not want or could not get a heart transplant (as is true of 90%+ of dying heart patients in North America) then you had to make a choice between stem cell treatment or standard Western Cardiology methodology.

Western Cardiology methodology kept 12% of patients (waiting for heart transplants) alive for five years.

Adult/repair Stem cell treatments kept 63% of patients (waiting for heart transplants) alive for five years. More than 5 times more heart transplant candidates lived for 5 years with stem cell treatments than the typical heart transplant recipient! Btw, stem cell science has made huge advancements in treating heart disease over the past seven years.

2003

Dr. Andreas Zeiher of the Goethe Institute in Frankfurt began much larger trials. As of 2007, he has overseen more ASC implants into hearts than anyone, both in and out of clinical trials and he was the first to prove that timely implant of RSC in new heart attack victims improves future mortality and morbidity – http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/search?journalcode=circulationaha&fulltext=zeiher

2004

Dr. Amit Patel of Pittsburgh completed two of the most successful trials ever. In Uruguay, he proved, on a group of ischemic heart failure patients, that a bypass plus cells was infinitely better than a bypass only. That same year, TheraVitae, in Israel, developed a new, powerful blood-derived stem cell and dared to treat the sickest patients no clinical trial (except Brazil) would consider.

One of the Brazilians, Dr. Perin, came to Texas, used the Brazil results to get the first ASC heart clinical trial approved by the FDA. Over a dozen such approvals were granted in the next 12-18 months.

The first-ever commercial stem cell treatment center in the world starts adult stem cell treatment of hundreds of human patients. Results are amazing and include the regrowing of cardiac muscle tissue in patients, significant increases and sometimes a doubling of ejection fractions (the % volume of blood the heart can pump out per beat), etc! Stem cells are also recognized as “smart,” going to where they were needed most, creating micro-vessel bypasses around existing blockages areas, areas that previously were blocked and in areas where stents were implanted.

2005

Dr Taylor removed all cells from rat hearts except for a thin skeleton of tissue translucent as wax paper. She then injected the scaffold with fresh Cardiac Repair Stem Cells from newborn rats. Four days later, “We could see these little areas that were beginning to beat. By eight days, we could see the whole heart beating.” The experiment, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, marked the first time scientists created a functioning heart in the lab from biological tissue.

ADULT STEM CELLS vs. HEART DISEASE – UNDENIABLE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

HEART DISEASE TRIAL – 2004 to 2006 –

Clinical trial illustrates the safety and efficacy of VesCell Adult Stem Cell treatment. Accepted by the American Heart Assn in 2005-6. This trial was a key element in attaining regulatory approval for the treatment protocol that improved the lives of 300 mostly “no-option” heart patients.

BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMOTOLOGY – 2006

Research paper shows that peripheral blood derived stem cells can differentiate into a variety of other stem cells (angiogenic, myocardial and neural lineages) and do so in sufficient quantities to use as autologous treatment for a variety of diseases.

ANGIOGENIC CELL CLINICAL STUDY – 106 CASES – 2005 to 2008

Clinical study at Chao Phya Hospital Heart Center and Siriraj Hospital H.M. Cardiac Center clinical study shows that transcoronary injection of angiogenic cells precursors improved cardiac/left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), exercise capacity and quality of life with high safety profile for 70% of ischemic cardiomyopathy patients with no-option revascularization.

CARDIOMYOPATHY TRIAL – 55 CASES – 2005 to 2006

Bangkok Heart Hospital and U of Pittsburgh Medical Center/McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine clinical trial shows that expanded autologous blood derived stem cells utilized in intramyocardial transplantation is feasible and safe in severely ill patients with intractable heart failure in all cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in both first-time and “redo” ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients.

PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE – SCIENTIFIC PAPER – 6 CASES

Shows the safety, and feasibility and enhancement of limb salvage from implantation of non-mobilized peripheral blood angiogenic cell precursors (NMPB-ACPs) in 80% of patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) who were poor candidates for standard revascularization treatment options.

BIOPROCESSING JOURNAL – 2007

Bioprocessing Journal scientific paper shows the consistent and reliable manufacturing procedure utilized for transforming bone marrow and blood-derived stem cells into angiogenic cell precursors (ACPs) and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cellular products for the treatment of severe heart diseases. End product was found to be a) safe and effective; b) prepared from non-mobilized peripheral blood; c) stable, with a relatively long shelf-life; and d) ready-to-use and easily utilized by the physician.

CEDAR SINAI – EDITING THE TRUTH

In BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS on February 14, 2012 at 3:37 pm

I commented on the recent Cedar Sinai heart stem cell story and received an interesting response.  The Cedar Sinai story used the following erroneous quote”

“This is the first instance of therapeutic regeneration”

I took issue with this and sited the many years of trials, studies and patients treated to illustrate its inaccuracy.  See my comment below and then that of the Health Care reporter from KPCC, Stephanie O’Neill, …

…………………

Comment by StemCellBlogger, Stem cell writer, author, patient advocate.
7 long years. It has taken 7 years for the US medical system to CATCH UP to the rest of the world.

This article, though pro-adult stem cell, uses the same tired, B.S.
lines like: “This is the first instance of therapeutic regeneration”
This article blatantly ignores the thousands of of studies, trials and
patients successfully treated over the last 7 years.

Sadly, we won’t see stem cell treatments readily, commonly and
commercially available in the US for a long time. Many people will
offer comments on these developments…
The uninformed will say: “first time ever!”
The optimists will say: “better late than never”
The realists will say: “10 years before US patients will have access to these treatments”
The families of those who have died over the past 7 years will say: “if only the US woke up sooner”

Stem cell treatments are available NOW outside of the United States at
some of the most modern and advanced hospitals and clinics in the
world. Maybe, just maybe, the families of those who WILL die from heart
disease over the NEXT 10 years will say: “NOW is the time to go where
they have been treating heart disease with stem cells for over half a
decade”

……………………………..

Comment by Stephanie O’Neill, Health Care reporter, KPCC:
For the record: The line quoted in the comment was in neither of my stories – online or broadcast versions. Thank you, Stephanie O’Neill, Health Care reporter, KPCC.

……………………………..

WHAT THIS MEANS:

I applaud Stephanie O’Neill (not the author of the original article) for understanding that the quote, “This is the first instance of therapeutic regeneration,” is wrong and further, not wanting her article and her reporting associated with inaccurate quotes.

Reporting on stem cells is like tap dancing through a  mine field.  There is so much misinformation out there and so many conflicting agendas and interests, it is very difficult to print the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.  We have a responsibility to the patients to try to disseminate the information truthfully and in a manner they can be readily understood.

Stephanie, thanks for doing your part!  You have definitely earned a gold star from The Stem Cell Blog today!


Patient’s own stem cells help heal heart, early research shows – CNN.com

In CATCH UP!, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 14, 2012 at 3:27 am

7 long years.

It has taken 7 years for the US medical system to CATCH UP to the rest of the world.  This article, though pro-adult stem cell, uses the same tired, B.S. lines like:

“This is the first instance of therapeutic regeneration”

This article blatantly ignores the thousands of of studies, trials and patients successfully treated over the last 7 years.  Sadly, we won’t see stem cell treatments readily, commonly and commercially available in the US for a long time. 

Many people will offer comments on these developments…

The uninformed will say: “first time ever!”

The optimists will say: “better late than never”

The realists will say: “10 years before US patients will have access to these treatments”

The families of those who have died over the past 7 years will say: “if only the US woke up sooner”

……………………

Stem cell treatments are available NOW outside of the United States at some of the most modern and advanced hospitals and clinics in the world.  Maybe, just maybe, the families of those who WILL die from heart disease over the NEXT 10 years will say:

“NOW is the time to go where they have been treating heart disease with stem cells for over half a decade”

For info on CURRENTLY AVAILABLE stem cell treatments for heart disease:

http://bit.ly/stemcellsnow

For more info and the HISTORY of stem cells for heart disease :

https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/heart-disease-treatment/

Patient's own stem cells help heal heart, early research shows

Patient’s own stem cells help heal heart, early research shows

A patient’s own heart cells can be used to regrow new heart tissue and help undo damage caused by a heart attack, according to early research published on Monday.

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore were able to treat 17 heart attack patients with cells grown from their own heart tissue and not only show the procedure was safe, but also that the cells can help reduce scarring and even cause new heart muscle to grow.

When a person suffers a heart attack, he or she is often left with huge areas of scarring in the heart. Scarred heart muscle doesn’t pump blood as well as it used to, putting stress on other parts of the heart to make up for the deficit. The damaged area also doesn’t conduct electric current as well, leading to an abnormal heart rhythm, which can cause more problems. Heart attack patients often go on to develop heart failure.

“This is the first instance of therapeutic regeneration,” says Dr. Eduardo Marbán, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. He says while nature abounds with examples of spontaneous regeneration of limbs or tissues – like a salamander’s new tail or a human liver regrowing to full size if partially damaged – doctors have not been able to help patients regrow heart tissue. This could change in the future if larger clinical trials and longer patient outcomes confirm the results of this early research published Monday in the journal The Lancet.  Marbán and his colleagues first presented this research at an American Heart Association conference in November…

Patient’s own stem cells help heal heart, early research shows – – CNN.com Blogs.

%d bloggers like this: