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Posts Tagged ‘bone marrow’

STEM CELL ‘LIVING BANDAGE’ FOR KNEE INJURIES

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 19, 2017 at 4:31 pm

Can we regrow a meniscus with stem cells?  Yes, of course.

  1. stem cells are harvested from the patient’s bone marrow
  2. cells are grown for 2 weeks
  3. cells are seeded onto a membrane scaffold
  4. the manufactured cell bandage is surgically implanted into the tear
  5. the cartilage is sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place

    All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation

Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans

December 16, 2016
Stem cell ‘living bandage’ for knee injuries trialled in humans
Credit: University of Bristol

A ‘living bandage’ made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol.

Meniscal tears are suffered by over one million people a year in the US and Europe alone and are particularly common in contact sports like football and rugby. 90 per cent or more of tears occur in the white zone of meniscus which lacks a blood supply, making them difficult to repair. Many professional sports players opt to have the torn tissue removed altogether, risking osteoarthritis in later life.

The cell bandage has been developed by Bristol University spin-out company Azellon, and is designed to enable the meniscal tear to repair itself by encouraging cell growth in the affected tissue.

A prototype version of the cell bandage was trialled in five patients, aged between 18 and 45, with white-zone meniscal tears. The trial received funding support from Innovate UK and the promising results have been published today in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

The procedure involved taking , harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow, which were then grown for two weeks before being seeded onto a membrane scaffold that helps to deliver the cells into the injured site. The manufactured cell bandage was then surgically implanted into the middle of the tear and the cartilage was sewn up around the bandage to keep it in place.

All five patients had an intact meniscus 12 months post implantation. By 24 months, three of the five patients retained an intact meniscus and had returned to normal knee functionality whilst the other two patients required surgical removal of the damaged meniscus due to a new tear or return of symptoms.

Professor Anthony Hollander, formerly of Bristol and now Chair of Stem Cell Biology at the University of Liverpool and Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Azellon, said: “The cell bandage trial results are very encouraging and offer a potential alternative to surgical removal that will repair the damaged tissue and restore full knee function.

“We are currently developing an enhanced version of the cell bandage using donor stem cells, which will reduce the cost of the procedure and remove the need for two operations.”

The cell bandage was produced by the Advanced Therapies Unit at the NHS Blood & Transplant facility in Speke, Liverpool and implanted into patients at Southmead Hospital in Bristol, under the supervision of Professor Ashley Blom, Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bristol.

Professor Blom, from Bristol’s School of Clinical Sciences, commented: “The cell bandage offers an exciting potential new treatment option for surgeons that could particularly benefit younger patients and athletes by reducing the likelihood of early onset osteoarthritis after meniscectomy.”

A spokesperson for Innovate UK said: “Turning into clinical and commercial reality requires close collaboration between businesses, universities, and Hospitals. It’s great to see this inter-disciplinary approach has led to such an exciting outcome from this first-in-human trial.”

Explore further: Pioneering stem cell bandage receives approval for clinical trial

More information: Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First-in-Human Study, , DOI: 10.1002/sctm.16-0199, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sctm.16-0199/abstract

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-12-stem-cell-bandage-knee-injuries.html#jCp

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SCIENTISTS “STUNNED” AS STROKE PATIENT WALKS AGAIN

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS FROM THE PAST, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 14, 2017 at 12:34 pm

“Stunned?”
C’mon guys…

stroke

STROKE CLINICAL TRIALS

  • The University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston July 1, 2009       Several months after becoming the first patient in the United States to undergo a revolutionary new stroke treatment, Roland “Bud” Henrich continues to improve. Doctors intravenously injected Henrich, 61, with stem cells taken from his own bone marrow…”The stem cells, we believe, may help repair the damage to his brain caused by the stroke,” said Sean Savitz, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston and the study’s lead investigator. “Animal studies have shown that when you administer stem cells after stroke, the cells enhance the healing. We know that stem cells have some kind of guidance system and migrate to the area of injury. They’re not making new brain cells but they may be enhancing the repair processes and reducing inflammatory damage.” http://www.texmedctr.tmc.edu/root/en/TMCServices/News/2009/07-01/Stem+Cells+Tested+for+Treatment+of+Stroke.htm

Other STROKE articles:

  1. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/autologous-neural-stem-cells-benefit-parkinson%e2%80%99s-patients-adultstemcell-com/
  2. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/stem-cell-treatment-for-stroke-and-traumatic-brain-injury-wholewellness-net/
  3. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-stem-cells-block-stroke-damage
  4. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110831160216.htm
  5. https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/04/28/stem-cells-from-menstrual-blood-may-benefit-stroke-patients/
  6. http://www.philly.com/philly/health/HealthDay686541_20140407_Stem_Cells_Show_Pro

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New Stem Cell Treatment Leaves Scientists “Stunned” As Wheelchair-Bound Stroke Patient Walks Again

MORE THAN 70 PERCENT OF STROKE PATIENTS END UP WITH LONG-TERM DISABILITIES.

Researchers are said to be “stunned” by the success of a recent clinical trial of a new stem cell treatment for stroke patients. By injecting the cells into participants’ brains, scientists were able to produce some remarkable improvements, with several patients regaining motor function in their limbs.

A full report of the study has been published in the journal Stroke, with lead author Gary Steinberg telling the Washington Post that patients’ improvements were “not just minimal recovery like someone who couldn’t move a thumb now being able to wiggle it. It was much more meaningful. One 71-year-old wheelchair-bound patient was walking again.”

The trial involved the use of modified bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells, which were injected into the specific region of each patient’s brain that had become damaged following their stroke. Amazingly, the researchers were not actually expecting to see any clinically relevant results at this stage, as they were just testing out a low dose of the treatment in order to assess its safety.

However, of the 18 patients involved in the study, seven experienced dramatic improvements in their cognitive and motor capabilities. In terms of safety, the study authors report that all participants experienced at least one temporary adverse effect, ranging from headaches and nausea to muscle spasticity. Importantly, though, all of these are thought to have been caused by the surgical procedure itself rather than the stem cells.

 

To evaluate the success of the treatment, the researchers used a number of standardized scales that are commonly used to assess the severity of symptoms in stroke patients. For instance, the Fugl-Meyer motor function total score is often used to measure recovery, with an improvement of 10 points representing a “clinically meaningful” change.

The patients involved in the study experienced an average improvement of 11.4 points on this scale, which translated into a “clinical improvement in the power of upper and lower limbs, ranging from an improvement in the ability to stand to the disappearance of tremor.”

Furthermore, the study authors make a point of noting that their patients had been suffering from their various symptoms for an average of 22 months prior to treatment. This is well beyond the six-month cut-off period that is typically considered to represent the point at which stroke-related brain damage becomes permanent and untreatable.

Exactly how the treatment works is not entirely understood, although Steinberg suspects that the stem cells somehow kick-start the brain’s own ability to repair itself, rather than developing into new neurons themselves.

Given that at present, more than 70 percent of people who suffer strokes end up with some sort of enduring disability, this new treatment could potentially be a game-changer – although more trials will be needed before it becomes readily available.

 

http://www.iflscience.com/brain/new-stem-cell-treatment-leaves-scientists-stunned-as-wheelchairbound-stroke-patient-walks-again/

HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS PROTECT AGAINST MYELOPROLIFERATIVE NEOPLASIA

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on June 25, 2014 at 9:14 am

​WHAT CAN’T STEM CELLS DO?

HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS PROTECT AGAINST MYELOPROLIFERATIVE NEOPLASIA

After over 15 years of main stream research around the world (with 50 years of bone marrow/stem cell transplant research and therapies), most people still believe there are only a few sources for stem cells; embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent.

Adult stem cells in particular though, consist of a huge number of stem cell sources: embryos, fetuses, placentas, umbilical cord blood, Wharton’s jelly, endometria, peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, placentas, adipose or fat tissue, skeletal and cardiac muscle, olfactoric mucosal (nasal neurological), breast milk, dental pulp, lungs and many other sources. Chinese scientists have even generated human teeth from the stem cells found in urine.

 

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Each stem cell source appears to have unique qualities and characteristics which scientists are barely beginning to fully understand. The blood or bone marrow have what are called “hematopoietic stem cells.”

“A hematopoietic stem cell is a cell isolated from the blood or bone marrow that can renew itself, can differentiate to a variety of specialized cells, can mobilize out of the bone marrow into circulating blood…” via

As if hematopoietic stem cells weren’t awesome enough due to their ability to produce cells of the blood and the immune system and destroy unneeded cells, they have an additional benefit which may be even more impressive. Hematopoietic stem cells introduced into the patient’s body also protects against myeloproliferative neoplasia.

Myeloproliferative neoplasm is “a type of disease in which the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells, platelets, or certain white blood cells. Myeloproliferative neoplasms usually get worse over time as the number of extra cells build up in the blood and/or bone marrow. This may cause bleeding problems, anemia, infection, fatigue, or other signs and symptoms. Certain myeloproliferative neoplasms may become acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Myeloproliferative neoplasms include chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), polycythemia vera, primary myelofibrosis, essential thrombocythemia, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, and chronic eosinophilic leukemia. Also called chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm.” via

As research continues, we learn more and more about the abilities of stem cells and their role as one of the most important healing systems in the human body.

clip_image004

HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS

Microenvironment of hematopoietic stem cells can be a target for myeloproliferative disorders

Posted: 22 Jun 2014 11:22 AM PDT

“The protective microenvironment of the hematopoietic stem cell niche, which produces cells of the blood and the immune system, also protects against myeloproliferative neoplasia. Protecting this microenvironment, or niche, has thus emerged as a new route for the treatment of these diseases, for which there is currently no fully effective treatment…”

 

 

CHILD RECEIVES NEW STEM CELL TRACHEA

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 30, 2013 at 2:44 pm
ht_ciaran_finn_lynch_trachea_transplant_ll_120725_wg

Two years ago, 11 year old Ciaran Finn-Lynch, became the world’s first child to receive new trachea.  Scientists/doctors used the child’s own stem cells to rebuild the airway in his body.  This is the really cool stuff because the public can wrap their heads around it and see a trachea in a dish, a nose growing on an arm, etc.  The next step in evolution of the public consciousness is to get them to understand…we can regrow and heal the organs which are already present in their own bodies, already damaged and in need of fixing…with stem cells from their own body.  I think this will be difficult as the home owner with the means will almost always go to the outside plumber or the super store and get a new piece of equipment to replace the old rather than pick up a wrench and fix what they have already.  Another byproduct of the disposable society we live in.  Homes, cars, washing machines and now organs are believed to have a limited life span.  When it breaks, just buy a new one.  – DG

Here’s the article from ScienceDaily:

Surgeons Transplant New Trachea Into Child Using His Own Stem Cells to Rebuild Airway

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100325114400.htm

Which was written based on materials from the University College of London release (what, you thought this was in the US?):

UCL surgeons perform revolutionary transplant operation

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1003/10031903

trachea

Here’s the 2 year follow-up:

Stem-cell-based, tissue engineered tracheal replacement in a child: a 2-year follow-up study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22841419

And the human interest story coverage of the same:

Stunning Recovery for First Child to Get Stem Cell Trachea

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/stunning-recovery-child-stem-cell-trachea/story?id=16858771

BLOOD, HEART AND BRAIN STEM CELLS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 11, 2013 at 10:40 am

stem cell science

Science daily is an excellent source for medical article and studies.  I’ve received their feed for quite a while now.  Here, are 3 stem cell articles from today.

  1. Blood stem cells, besides turning into hema type cells can also become white blood cells.
  2. Cardiac stem cells from bone marrow can heal the heart.  This we’ve known since the late 90’s but additional confirmation is always appreciated.
  3. Brain stem cells not only can turn into brain and nerve cells but they also clear out the garbage in the brain and keep the cells in a perpetual stem cell state.

These are 3 good stem cell articles but also of note…

This is the first time Science Daily has had three stem cell articles in their feed.  The world is turning to stem cells.  Are you?

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Surprising ability of blood stem cells to respond to emergencies

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131227.htm 

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 10:12 AM PDT

Scientists have revealed an unexpected role for hematopoietic stem cells: They do not merely ensure the continuous renewal of our blood cells; in emergencies they are capable of producing white blood cells “on demand” that help the body deal with inflammation or infection. This property could be used to protect against infections in patients undergoing bone marrow transplants, while their immune system reconstitutes itself.

 

Cardiopoietic ‘smart’ stem cells show promise in heart failure patients

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410103349.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 07:33 AM PDT

Therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or “smart” stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions.

 

Spring cleaning in your brain’s stem cells?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094120.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 06:41 AM PDT

Deep inside your brain, a legion of stem cells lies ready to turn into new brain and nerve cells when you need them. New research shows the vital role of a type of internal “spring cleaning” that both clears out garbage inside the cells, and keeps them in their perpetual stem-cell state.

STEM CELL THERAPY INCREASES SUCCESS RATE OF LIVER TRANSPLANTS

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 20, 2013 at 9:00 am

Liver-transplant-006

Stem cell therapy is new hope for liver transplant patients

Stem cell therapy has been found useful in over 60 per cent of the patients due for liver transplant, as per a paper submitted by doctors at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital in Delhi recently. Not only is the treatment less cumbersome and risky, its cost is also comparatively very reasonable.

According to the paper’s principal author and chairman of the Department of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases at the Hospital, Dr. Anil Arora, a large number of patients requiring liver transplantation cannot afford it for two reasons – cost and donor availability.

In view of the logistical problems faced by such patients, Dr. Arora said: “We started looking at the feasibility of alternative methods like using reserve cells in the body for such treatment, as it costs even less.  Some of these cells can be mobilized from the bone marrow as it has the capacity to regenerate the cells. So we stimulate the bone marrow by an injection.”

“This injection is given for five days and it mobilizes the bone marrow and some of the cells. They then come into the blood circulation. In the study we tried to filter these cells from the blood marrow using a specialized filtering machine and the concentrate of these cells. About 5 ml to 10 ml of the blood containing these concentrated group of cells were then injected into the hepatic artery, which supplies blood to the liver,” explained Dr. Arora. He said this process was carried out by a number of different mechanisms and it proved quite successful. “We started about two years ago and finished last year. Then these patients were followed up for another one year and we were happy to see a significant proportion of the patients having substantial improvement in the liver functions as assessed by a score called ‘Child score’.”

Dr. Arora said, “All patients tolerated the treatment well without any side effects. Of the 10 patients, six to seven benefited. So we believe that more frequent administration of the stem cells in large number might have a more beneficial impact.”

While the study by the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital team was published this year and was approved by the Department of Biotechnology and Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India, Dr. Arora said there is also other published data now which calls for “stimulating the bone marrow and letting the cells automatically go into the liver”. By this, he said, you avoid filtering and putting the blood with the stem cells into the liver. “This is also equally beneficial.”

Dr. Arora said stem cell therapy “might act as a bridge for liver transplant” and can provide some time to the patients to arrange for treatment. But just like a damaged car tire, he said, a damaged liver after minor repairs has to be replaced. “However, if a person stops taking liquor or if the therapy goes on well, then a patient can lead a healthy life for many more years.”

http://www.thehindu.com

Stem Cells from Human Adipose Tissue Used to Chase Migrating Cancer Cells

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 15, 2013 at 11:21 am
Stemness of primary AMSC lines demonstrated with differentiation along three mesenchymal lineages, Adipocyte (a, d [48], g), Osteocyte (b [48], e, h), and Chondrocyte (c [48], f, i), documented via lineage specific staining with Oil Red O, Alizarin Red, and Collagen II, respectively. (Credit: Pendleton et al. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue vs Bone Marrow: In Vitro Comparison of Their Tropism towards Gliomas. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (3): e58198 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058198)
Using Fat to Fight Brain Cancer: Stem Cells from Human Adipose Tissue Used to Chase Migrating Cancer Cells

Mar. 12, 2013 — In laboratory studies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found that stem cells from a patient’s own fat may have the potential to deliver new treatments directly into the brain after the surgical removal of a glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain tumor.


The investigators say so-called mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have an unexplained ability to seek out damaged cells, such as those involved in cancer, and may provide clinicians a new tool for accessing difficult-to-reach parts of the brain where cancer cells can hide and proliferate anew. The researchers say harvesting MSCs from fat is less invasive and less expensive than getting them from bone marrow, a more commonly studied method.

STEM CELLS REDUCE BRAIN DAMAGE AFTER STROKE

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 7, 2013 at 9:00 am

stroke

Stroke – Stem Cells Can Reduce Brain Damage

Rescuing a patient from a stroke and restoring cognitive functions are two significant medical challenges today. Blockage of a brain artery, usually by a clot or atherosclerotic plaque, results in reduction in oxygen supply to brain cells. If the supply of oxygen is interrupted for a long time, brain cells die resulting in severe loss of motor and cognitive functions. Therapeutic approaches to prevent the formation of plaques or blood clots are not a hundred percent successful in preventing a stroke. Recent research has focused on aiding regeneration of brain cells after an ischemic stroke and stem cells have been used with reasonable success.

Experiments conducted on rats show that intravenous injection of stem cells derived from adipose tissues as well as mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow supported the recovery of brain cells after a stroke. In these experiments, rats were subjected to a stroke by blocking their middle cerebral artery permanently. Stem cells from bone marrow as well as fat cells were injected 30 minutes after induction and the health of the animals was assessed at 24 hours and 14 days after stroke. In the recovery period, animals injected with stem cells showed increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and synaptophysin. The injected stem cells did not migrate to the site of the lesion but presumably acted as a source of neurotrophic growth factors.

In another study, stem cells from the dental pulp of human deciduous teeth (milk teeth) were grafted in the brains of mice one day after induction of a stroke. In some animals, the culture medium in which these cells were grown was used instead of the cells. Mice treated with human dental pulp stem cells and conditioned medium from these cells showed better recovery and neurological outcome than untreated mice. Grafted stem cells as well as the conditioned medium inhibited death of neurons in the recovery period and prevented cell destruction resulting from inflammation. In these experiments, the actual integration of human dental pulp stem cells into the brain tissue occurred at very low frequency.

Both studies present important insights in the process of regeneration of brain cells followed hypoxic and ischemic stroke. Stem cells secrete a number of growth factors which help to promote generation of new neurons post a stroke. The results presented by Yamagata and colleagues where just the culture medium from dental pulp stem cells was effective in restoring brain tissue and neurological functions indicate that a suitable “growth factor cocktail” can be derived from cultures of stem cells to treat stroke. Since intravenous injection of stem cells also helps recovery from stroke, it is easy to deliver such a therapeutic intervention. A xenograft of human dental pulp stem cells was successful in helping mice recover from a stroke. It would be interesting to know whether stem cells from other animal systems have a similar beneficial effect on human neurons as well.

References

Gutierrez-Fernandez M, Rodriguez-Frutos B, Ramos-Cejudo J, Vallejo-Cremades MT, Fuentes B, Cerdan S, & Diez-Tejedor E (2013). Effects of intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery and brain repair markers in experimental ischemic stroke. Stem cell research & therapy, 4 (1) PMID: 23356495

Yamagata M, Yamamoto A, Kako E, Kaneko N, Matsubara K, Sakai K, Sawamoto K, & Ueda M (2013). Human dental pulp-derived stem cells protect against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice. Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation, 44 (2), 551-4 PMID: 23238858

Brain Blogger

IBD PATIENTS SOON TO BE TREATED WITH STEM CELLS

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 4, 2013 at 9:02 am

mix_bowel diagram

Research Supports Promise of Cell Therapy for Bowel Disease

Researchers have identified a special population of adult stem cells in bone marrow that have the natural ability to migrate to the intestine and produce intestinal cells, suggesting their potential to restore healthy tissue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Up to 1 million Americans have IBD, which is characterized by frequent diarrhea and abdominal pain. IBD actually refers to two conditions — ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease — in which the intestines become red and swollen and develop ulcers, probably as the result of the body having an immune response to its own tissue.

While there is currently no cure for IBD, there are drug therapies aimed at reducing inflammation and preventing the immune response. Because these therapies aren’t always effective, scientists hope to use stem cells to develop an injectable cell therapy to treat IBD.  The research findings are reported online in the FASEB Journal (the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) by senior researcher Graca Almeida-Porada, M.D., Ph.D., professor of regenerative medicine at Wake Forest Baptist’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and colleagues.

The new research complements a 2012 report by Almeida-Porada’s team that identified stem cells in cord blood that are involved in blood vessel formation and also have the ability to migrate to the intestine.  “We’ve identified two populations of human cells that migrate to the intestine — one involved in blood vessel formation and the other that can replenish intestinal cells and modulates inflammation,” said Almeida-Porada. “Our hope is that a mixture of these cells could be used as an injectable therapy to treat IBD.”

The cells would theoretically induce tissue recovery by contributing to a pool of cells within the intestine. The lining of the intestine has one of the highest cellular turnover rates in the body, with all cell types being renewed weekly from this pool of cells, located in an area of the intestine known as the crypt.  In the current study, the team used cell markers to identify a population of stem cells in human bone marrow with the highest potential to migrate to the intestine and thrive. The cells express high levels of a receptor (ephrin type B) that is involved in tissue repair and wound closure.

The cells also known to modulate inflammation were injected into fetal sheep at 55 to 62 days gestation. At 75 days post-gestation, the researchers found that most of the transplanted cells were positioned in the crypt area, replenishing the stem cells in the intestine.

“Previous studies in animals have shown that the transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells can contribute to the regeneration of the gastrointestinal tract in IBD,” said Almeida-Porada.

http://www.wakehealth.edu

Stem cells aid recovery from stroke

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 18, 2013 at 3:53 pm
Stem cells aid recovery from stroke
January 27, 2013 in Medical research
Stem cells from bone marrow or fat improve recovery after stroke in rats, finds a study published in BioMed Central‘s open access journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy. Treatment with stem cells improved the amount of brain and nerve repair and the ability of the animals to complete behavioural tasks.
Stem cell therapy holds promise for patients but there are many questions which need to be answered, regarding treatment protocols and which cell types to use. This research attempts to address some of these questions. Rats were treated intravenously with stem cells or saline 30 minutes after a stroke. At 24 hours after stroke the stem cell treated rats showed a better functional recovery. By two weeks these animals had near normal scores in the tests. This improvement was seen even though the stem cells did not appear to migrate to the damaged area of brain.
The treated rats also had higher levels of biomarkers implicated in brain repair including, the growth factor VEGF. A positive result was seen for both fat (adipose) and bone-marrow derived stem cells. Dr Exuperio Díez-Tejedor from La Paz University Hospital, explained, “Improved recovery was seen regardless of origin of the stem cells, which may increase the usefulness of this treatment in human trials. Adipose-derived cells in particular are abundant and easy to collect without invasive surgery.”

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-stem-cells-aid-recovery.html#jCp

 

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