DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘BBC’

Jaw bone created from (patient’s own) stem cells

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 21, 2010 at 5:13 pm

Jaw bone created from (patient’s own) stem cells – BBC NEWS | Health | – New bone created in the lab

The new bone was created from bone marrow stem cells

Scientists have created part of the jaw joint in the lab using human adult stem cells.

Two points from me:

1. Cloning, shmoning! The facts is, they have already created hearts, windpipes and jawbones from adult stem cells. No clones needed, no rejection issues, no transplants, no immunosuppressive drugs,….we can just make the bone, organ, teeth, etc that fit perfectly into your body because they are made from your body (and from your own stem cells).

2. The only problem is the USA is Soooooo S…L….O….W to pick up on the information that the rest of the world has already known about for years. As far as stem cell advances go…we went from world leader to “back of da bus” in half a decade…and I doubt we will ever catch up!

They say it is the first time a complex, anatomically-sized bone has been accurately created in this way.

It is hoped the technique could be used not only to treat disorders of the specific joint, but more widely to correct problems with other bones too.

The Columbia University study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The bone which has been created in the lab is known as the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).

The availability of personalized bone grafts engineered from the patient’s own stem cells would revolutionise the way we currently treat these defects – Dr Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Columbia University

Problems with the joint can be the result of birth defects, arthritis or injury.

Although they are widespread, treatment can be difficult.

The joint has a complex structure which makes it difficult to repair by using grafts from bones elsewhere in the body.

The latest study used human stem cells taken from bone marrow.

These were seeded into a tissue scaffold, formed into the precise shape of the human jaw bone by using digital images from a patient.

The cells were then cultured using a specially-designed bioreactor which was able to infuse the growing tissue with exactly the level of nutrients found during natural bone development.

Big potential

Lead researcher Dr Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic said: “The availability of personalised bone grafts engineered from the patient’s own stem cells would revolutionise the way we currently treat these defects.”

Dr Vunjak-Novakovic said the new technique could also be applied to other bones in the head and neck, including skull bones and cheek bones, which are similarly difficult to graft.

The option to engineer anatomically pieces of human bone in this way could potentially transform the ability to carry out reconstruction work, for instance following serious injury or cancer treatment.

She said: “We thought the jawbone would be the most rigorous test of our technique; if you can make this, you can make any shape.”

She stressed that the joint created in the lab was bone only, and did not include other tissue, such as cartilage. However, the Columbia team is working on a new method for engineering hybrid grafts including bone and cartilage.

Another major challenge for scientists will be to find a way to engineer bone with a blood supply that can be easily connected to the blood supply of the host.

Professor Anthony Hollander, a tissue engineering expert from the University of Bristol who helped produce an artificial windpipe last year, said there was still a lot of work to be done before the new bone could be used on patients.

But he said: “One of the major problems facing scientists in this field is how to engineer a piece of bone with the right dimensions – that is critical for some of these bone defects.

“This is a lovely piece of tissue engineering which has produced bone with a high degree of accuracy in terms of shape.”

via BBC NEWS | Health | Jaw bone created from stem cells.

Jaw bone created from stem cells – BBC News

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on October 11, 2009 at 10:48 am

Jaw bone created from stem cells

New bone created in the lab

The new bone was created from bone marrow stem cells

Scientists have created part of the jaw joint in the lab using human adult stem cells.

They say it is the first time a complex, anatomically-sized bone has been accurately created in this way.

It is hoped the technique could be used not only to treat disorders of the specific joint, but more widely to correct problems with other bones too.

The Columbia University study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The bone which has been created in the lab is known as the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).

The availability of personalized bone grafts engineered from the patient’s own stem cells would revolutionise the way we currently treat these defects

Problems with the joint can be the result of birth defects, arthritis or injury.

Although they are widespread, treatment can be difficult.

The joint has a complex structure which makes it difficult to repair by using grafts from bones elsewhere in the body.

The latest study used human stem cells taken from bone marrow.

These were seeded into a tissue scaffold, formed into the precise shape of the human jaw bone by using digital images from a patient.

The cells were then cultured using a specially-designed bioreactor which was able to infuse the growing tissue with exactly the level of nutrients found during natural bone development…

via BBC NEWS | Health | Jaw bone created from stem cells.

BBC NEWS | Health | Cell find ‘lifts leukaemia fight’

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on February 7, 2009 at 4:39 pm
purple-leukemia-stem-cells

Purple acute myelod leukaemia cells visible amongst the blood cells

A Stanford University study found that leukaemia “stem cells”, which drive the spread of the cancer, work differently to healthy blood stem cells.

This might mean they could be targeted and destroyed more easily.

The study, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, might one day reduce the chances of leukaemia returning after treatment, say experts.

These findings may have a substantial clinical impact
Dr Tim Somervaille
Study author

Cancer was once regarded a disease in   which all malignant cells were the same, but in recent years, cancer researchers have focused on the role of cancer “stem cells”.

These, like healthy stem cells, provide a source for new cells, and it is important to kill these to stop the cancer regrouping and returning.

This is a problem in leukaemia, in which there can be a significant risk of relapse even after apparently successful chemotherapy.

Conventional treatment for some forms of leukaemia destroys both leukaemia cells and healthy blood cells, but the latest research may point to ways in which therapies can be fine tuned to pick off the leukaemia stem cells more efficiently.

The researchers found difference between two types of stem cells.

Leukaemia stem cells, they found, tap into a genetic mechanism normally harnessed by stem cells in the embryo to allow their division into fresh cells.

Normal blood stem cells use a difference mechanism to prompt their growth.

This means that, in theory at least, drugs which targeted this process would stop leukaemia stem cells dividing, while leaving healthy blood stem cells unharmed…

BBC NEWS | Health | Cell find ‘lifts leukaemia fight’.

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