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Posts Tagged ‘arthritis’

Search and Rescue Dog in 9/11 Attacks Receives Stem Cell Treatment in Burke – Lorton, VA Patch

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 20, 2012 at 3:12 am

Search and Rescue Dog in 9/11 Attacks Receives Stem Cell Treatment in Burke

Treatment should help alleviate aches and pains for “Red,” a 12-year-old black Labrador retriever.

 March 19, 2012

    

 

A decade ago, “Red,” a black Labrador search and rescue dog, was deployed in the 9/11 attacks at the Pentagon in Arlington.

Many of the hundreds of search and rescue dogs sent to the Pentagon, World Trade Center in New York City and Shanksville, Pa., have since passed away.

On Monday, Red, who is now 12 years old, received a breakthrough stem cell regenerative treatment from Dr. John Herrity, D.V.M., at the Burke Animal Clinic to help ease crippling arthritis and live out her days in greater comfort.

Red was sent to the Pentagon on Sept. 16, 2001, with her owner and handler, Heather Roche of Annapolis, Md. They worked at the site for 11 days, finding remains of victims in the Pentagon’s north parking-lot area. Red later helped in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

No longer able to handle tasks like climbing a two-story ladder, Red retired in July 2011. “She still wants to work, but her body just can’t do it anymore,” Roche said.

“This dog gave a lot to us,” Herrity said Monday afternoon after performing the treatment on Red. “They do searches for remains in burned out buildings. It’s the least we can do for these guys.”

Procedure Lets Old Dogs Run, Play Again

The two-part procedure takes a little over an hour and normally costs $2,000 to $2,400. Two other 9/11 dogs that recently received the same stem cell therapy are able to run, climb and play again. The treatment mainly helps larger breed dogs ages 9 and older with hip and arthritis problems.

Herrity has experience with more than two-dozen stem cell operations. MediVet-America, which developed the in-clinic stem cell technology, donated the cost of the procedure and cryogenic banking of additional stem cells.

Veterinarians and researchers describe stem cell regenerative therapy as a major scientific development in the treatment of arthritis, hip dysplasia, ligament and cartilage injuries and other degenerative joint diseases in dogs, cats, horses and other animals. The technology uses an adult animals’ own stem cells to heal itself.

MediVet-America’s treatment involves removing fat tissue from the animal, separating the stem cells from the fat, activating and injecting the cells into the affected areas. Within four to six weeks, animals who were in severe pain with a restricted range of motion are able to walk, run and even jump again. Key to the procedure is an advanced, patented L.E.D. technology that activates millions of dormant stem cells present in fat tissue.

MediVet donated the test kit system for Red’s procedure on Monday.

Two other Sept. 11 search and rescue dogs also have been treated with stem cell therapy and are doing well, according to MediVet. Bailey, a 15 year-old black Lab, underwent the procedure in November. Hoke, a 14 year-old yellow Lab, was treated in December. Both are doing well, according to their handlers, and have resumed normal activity in retirement.

“We are proud to help the unsung canine heroes of 9/11 more than a decade after the attacks,” said MediVet-America CEO Jeremy Delk. “They deserve the very best stem cell therapeutic care that is now being received by animals across the nation.”

Herrity said the recovery process takes about two to three months. “Our society today wants everything done yesterday,” he said. “But that’s not how the body works.”

 

Search and Rescue Dog in 9/11 Attacks Receives Stem Cell Treatment in Burke – Lorton, VA Patch.

Stem Cell Technology Treating Many Degenerative Diseases…In Pets

In ALL ARTICLES on March 31, 2011 at 10:14 am

Technology is giving us many new inventions daily. One such recent invention of world class manufacturing technology has been made by Medivet Pty Ltd. The Research and Development Division of the company has introduced a new procedure with the help of which, the veterinarians can extract, process and activate an animal’s own adult stem cells by injecting them back again into the animal’s own body.

Medivet has recently introduced this unique procedure. Several countries worldwide and many international veterinarians today are using this procedure to treat many degenerative diseases such as primary and secondary arthritis, hip dysplasia, damaged or torn ligaments and tendons, joint pain, worn or damaged cartilage etc.

Medivet has spent many years and millions of dollars to introduce this one of the most exciting and valuable treatments ever released, exclusively for the veterinary field. The company is really making big with its American division, Medivet America LLC that is leading the field in sales and Adipose Stem Cell procedures.

Trials are still being conducted at many universities, in Australia and internationally. Also, thousands of Adipose Stem Cell Kits have been supplied to veterinarians enabling them to perform Stem cell procedures including the 14 international countries to which, Medivet is currently exporting the kits.

Stem Cell Technology Treating Many Degenerative Diseases Today | TopNews United States.

Palos Hills Veterinarian Tries New Treatment For Her Dog

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 17, 2011 at 8:09 pm

A Palos Hills vet leaned on a colleague for an innovative treatment for her own dog.

By Cristel Mohrman

Credit Cristel Mohrman
As a veterinarian, Leslie Dahl knows the obstacles that aging pets can face. And as a pet owner, she has watched her own dog battle the stairs with arthritic hips.  But if all goes as planned, her dog will soon be walking pain-free. Doodle, a German shepherd, became a guinea pig, so to speak, as the first animal in Illinois to undergo a one-day, in-clinic stem cell procedure.

Dr. Mitch Robbins conducted the procedure on Friday at Buffalo Grove’s Veterinary Specialty Center, where he removed fat tissue from Doodle’s abdominal area and used the center’s newest technology to inject the dog’s hip joints with her own stem cells.

“The reason that it works is that those cells that we’re removing and processing and stimulating are cells that are normally associated with the healing process and the inflammatory process in the body,” Robbins said. “So they go into the joint, they reduce some of the inflammation in the joint, they improve and reduce pain, they improve range of motion, they improve use of the joint.”

While the Buffalo Grove clinic has performed about 40 such regenerative therapy procedures over the past four years, until now the extracted materials were shipped off-site for preparation, resulting in a more drawn out and expensive process.

Last week, Veterinary Specialty Center adopted new technology from Kentucky-based MediVet-America, which allows medical professionals to complete the entire process in-house over the course of just a few hours.

Katherine Wilkie, MediVet-America’s lab services director, guided Buffalo Grove’s team through the process, which involves using machinery to separate stem cells from the rest of the animal’s tissue and cleaning it so that it can be re-injected.

While professionals received instruction, Doodle, still groggy from the tissue extraction, waited in a nearby cage. By the end of the day, she was picked up by Dahl, who brought her back to their Oak Park home.

Over the next few weeks, she is expected to regain her mobility, which has been hindered by bilateral hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis.

“With the stem cells, we’re hoping that they buy her some quality relief and improve her quality of life,” said Dahl, who is a veterinarian at Southwest Animal Care Center in Palos Hills. “I want her to be able to play and the next day not have any of the post-exercise inflammation that she’s having now.”

Robbins emphasized that stem cell treatment will not cure arthritis,but in most cases the procedure eases his four-legged patients’ discomfort. He said the treatment has benefited about 75 percent of his patients, and two-thirds have no longer needed pain medication.

That is especially important to pet owners like Dahl, whose German shepherd’s sensitive stomach won’t tolerate more traditional treatments. Last spring, she brought Doodle to Veterinary Specialty Center for collagen gel injections that noticeably improved the dog’s condition. When Doodle’s discomfort returned in recent months and Dahl learned that the treatment was no longer available, she jumped at the chance to test out the stem cell process.

“We’re going to do what we can to make sure she’s with us as long as possible,” Dahl said.

Robbins said stem cell therapy is generally effective for about 18 months. Extra cells are collected during the initial extraction and stored for subsequent injections, he said.

“They are never going to cure the arthritis, but they should do a very good job of controlling the pain that Doodle has, allowing her to resume a better, more normal quality of life,” he said.

MediVet-America’s technology was introduced in the U.S. May 2010, and it is now being used in 23 states, Wilkie said, with one or two procedures taking place in the U.S. each day.

Doctors report success rates ranging from 75 percent to 90 percent, Wilkie said.

The procedure costs about $1,800; nearly $1,000 less than the expense of a multiple-day procedure, which involves the costs of sending the tissue to outside labs.

Robbins said he expects to use the new technology to benefit 20 to 50 dogs and cats per year.

Top of Form

Will Rover outlive Grandma?
https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/03/01/will-rover-outlive-grandma/

Medical marijuana has been shown to facilitate stem cell implantation

In Medical Marijuana, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 26, 2010 at 1:00 am

As far back as April, 2009, research showed that medical marijuana can help with stem cell implantations.  Stem cells and weed, a potent combination! – dg

The uses for this medicine range from pain relief to stopping the spread of breast cancer. It has also been shown to facilitate stem cell implantation. Marijuana can be used to treat Alzheimer’s, arthritis, cancer, glaucoma, Parkinson’s and other conditions.

Florida could be the next medical marijuana state
Organizers around Florida ready to collect signatures

The Florida Division of Elections has approved a petition that may place a constitutional amendment on the Florida ballot that would allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

People United For Medical Marijuana has received approval to circulate a petition to place this issue before Florida voters in 2010. This amendment would give patients the right to grow, purchase, posses and obtain marijuana for medical treatment.

According to medical reports there are more than 1.7 million seriously ill people in the state of Florida that could benefit from marijuana’s medicinal properties. The uses for this medicine range from pain relief to stopping the spread of breast cancer. It has also been shown to facilitate stem cell implantation. Marijuana can be used to treat Alzheimer’s, arthritis, cancer, glaucoma, Parkinson’s and other conditions.

“Patients need a safe, affordable, and effective medication. We hope Florida will lead the nation in marijuana research to further its uses as a medicine.” said Kim Russell, chairman of People United For Medical Marijuana..

http://fortmyers.floridaweekly.com/news/2009/0408/top_news/020.html

Former President of Argentina, Dr. Fernando de la Rua, Visits Colorado Stem Cell Therapy Clinic – Technology | Centre Daily Times – State College, PA | Penn State, Nittany Lions, weather, news, jobs, homes, apartments, real estate

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 13, 2010 at 11:23 pm

Former President of Argentina, Dr. Fernando de la Rua, Visits Colorado Stem Cell Therapy Clinic

Respected leader seeks to take innovative stem cell therapy to Latin America

July 13, 2010 6:31pm EDT

HOUSTON — While in Denver, CO, to participate in the Transnational Summit of Former Heads of State with twelve other former Presidents, current government officials, and dignitaries during the Biennial of the Americas, the former Argentinean President, Dr. Fernando de la Rua, made a special trip to Broomfield, CO, yesterday to visit a stem cell therapy clinic. The visit, coordinated by David Bonner, Chairman & CEO of Stematix™, Inc., allowed Dr. De la Rua to tour the Centeno-Schultz Clinic, meet with the doctors and observe the Regenexx™ procedure performed on several patients.

Dr. de la Rua, former President of Argentina, former Mayor of the City of Buenos Aires, and a distinguished law professor, visited the clinic in order to better understand stem cell therapy and speak directly to the patients who are benefiting from the regenerative procedure that uses a person’s own stem cells to repair joints, ligaments, bone and tendons.

“The development of progressive, state-of-the-art stem cell therapy clinics in Latin America is something that I am very interested in,” said Dr. de la Rua. “My visit to the Centeno-Schultz Clinic solidified my belief that the use of adult stem cells in stem cell therapies is of great benefit to the general population.”

Adult stem cells are those found throughout the patient’s own body. Recent medical research has indicated these important cells have as much clinical promise as the more controversial embryonic stem cells (cells taken from an embryo).

“The Regenexx™ Procedure, using a person’s own stem cells, is a breakthrough, non-surgical treatment option for people suffering from moderate to severe joint or bone pain due to injury and other conditions” said David Bonner, Ph.D., Chairman & CEO of Stematix™, Inc. “Because of the reduced risk and significantly shortened recovery time, stem cell therapy is an ideal option for individuals around the world.”

About Stematix™, Inc.

Stematix™, Inc. (Houston, USA) is a regenerative medicine delivery company whose goal is to make regenerative medicine products and treatments available to patients at reasonable cost and to international medical standards. Stematix is a licensee for the Regenexx Procedure in Latin America. Please visit the Stematix website (www.stematix.com) for more information.

via Former President of Argentina, Dr. Fernando de la Rua, Visits Colorado Stem Cell Therapy Clinic – Technology | Centre Daily Times – State College, PA | Penn State, Nittany Lions, weather, news, jobs, homes, apartments, real estate.

Natural Health Care: Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

In ALL ARTICLES on July 13, 2010 at 12:59 pm

This article is interesting because the UK has been typically focused on embryonic stem cell research.  They are now accepting the benefits of safety of adult stem cells and putting their research time and money into it.  Perhaps the US should follow suit so they are not the last kid on the block to get their “big wheel” or “x-box?” – dg

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

BBC news A stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis is to be tested on patients in the UK for the first time.

A year-long trial, funded by Arthritis Research UK, will mix stem cells with cartilage cells in the lab and inject them back into damaged knee joints.

Bone marrow stem cell
Stem cell therapy is a less invasive treatment than joint replacement

The new treatment could be an alternative to joint replacement surgery, experts hope.  Scientists from Keele University will study up to 70 people from the end of this year.  The trial will be run at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital in Oswestry, Shropshire as part of a five-year research programme.  Three treatments are being tested in a randomised trial of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cell therapy

Using keyhole surgery, a patient’s cartilage cells – also known as chondrocytes – and bone marrow stem cells will be removed and grown in a laboratory for three weeks.  We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term.

Professor Sally Roberts, Keele University

They will then be re-implanted separately in some patients, and mixed together in other patients, into the area of damaged or worn cartilage.  Scientists will then test the effectiveness of all three types of cell therapy, based on the quality of the new cartilage formed over a period of 12 months.  Chondrocytes – cartilage cells – have been grown in a lab and re-injected into patients’ damaged knees for the last 15 years.  But scientists now want to find out if combining cartilage cells and stem cells in the same process could work better, and specifically if one type of cell stimulates the other.

Less invasive

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 8m people in the UK.  The condition is caused by wear and tear to the surface of joints, leading to stiffness and pain.  At present there is little effective treatment for osteoarthritis patients, apart from pain-relieving drugs and joint replacement.  The trial will focus on knee joints, but the results could have implications for other joints, say the scientists.  The advantage of stem cell treatment is that it’s much less invasive than major joint replacement surgery.  Sally Roberts, professor of orthopaedic research at Keele University and lead scientist on the trial, says it’s also a more “biological approach”.

“We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints.

The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term repair,” she said.

via Natural Health Care: Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Stem cell therapy ‘first’ in trial on arthritic knees

BBC news A stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis is to be tested on patients in the UK for the first time.A year-long trial, funded by Arthritis Research UK, will mix stem cells with cartilage cells in the lab and inject them back into damaged knee joints.

Bone marrow stem cell
Stem cell therapy is a less invasive treatment than joint replacement
The new treatment could be an alternative to joint replacement surgery, experts hope.

Scientists from Keele University will study up to 70 people from the end of this year.

The trial will be run at the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital in Oswestry, Shropshire as part of a five-year research programme.

Three treatments are being tested in a randomised trial of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cell therapyUsing keyhole surgery, a patient’s cartilage cells – also known as chondrocytes – and bone marrow stem cells will be removed and grown in a laboratory for three weeks.

We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term

Professor Sally Roberts, Keele University

They will then be re-implanted separately in some patients, and mixed together in other patients, into the area of damaged or worn cartilage.

Scientists will then test the effectiveness of all three types of cell therapy, based on the quality of the new cartilage formed over a period of 12 months.

Chondrocytes – cartilage cells – have been grown in a lab and re-injected into patients’ damaged knees for the last 15 years.

But scientists now want to find out if combining cartilage cells and stem cells in the same process could work better, and specifically if one type of cell stimulates the other.

Less invasive

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 8m people in the UK.

The condition is caused by wear and tear to the surface of joints, leading to stiffness and pain.

At present there is little effective treatment for osteoarthritis patients, apart from pain-relieving drugs and joint replacement.

The trial will focus on knee joints, but the results could have implications for other joints, say the scientists.

The advantage of stem cell treatment is that it’s much less invasive than major joint replacement surgery.

Sally Roberts, professor of orthopaedic research at Keele University and lead scientist on the trial, says it’s also a more “biological approach”.

“We are using the body’s own cells to repair damaged joints. The hope is that it will be permanent and long-term repair,” she said.

Video: Using dog fat cells to treat arthritis | NBC13.com

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 5, 2009 at 11:29 am

saddogPublished: March 5, 2009

Imagine watching your dog become crippled, with no relief from drugs or surgery.

That’s what happened to one California pet owner.

Fortunately she found a life-saving treatment using the dog’s own fat.

It’s hard to believe seeing it now, but a couple of months ago Abby, a 6-year old shelty, could barely walk.

“we were talking about euthanizing her because she was in so much pain,“ said owner Vicky Rusconi.

Rusconi tried countless procedures to help her dog’s debilitating arthritis, but nothing worked.

When a vet at the animal clinic where she works recommended injecting stem cells using Abby’s own fat, she figured she had nothing to lose.

“I was skeptical to be honest, but I was willing to try anything,“ Rusconi said. “I think when you get to the point where it’s either euthanize your dog or try a new procedure, you’re willing to try it.“

Since the first round worked so well, Abby is now undergoing a second round of stem cell injections using her own fat.

via Video: Using dog fat cells to treat arthritis | NBC13.com.

Bristol University | News from the University | A stem cell bandage for your knee

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 1:08 pm

A stem cell bandage for your knee

knee-and-stem-cells

knee-and-adult-stem-cell-"bandage"

17 February 2009

Back in December 2003, re:search reported on the work being done by Anthony Hollander, Professor of Rheumatology and Tissue Engineering in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, who was pioneering regenerative medicine techniques in order to replace cartilage in the knees of osteoarthritis sufferers. Five years later, re:search reviews the remarkable developments that have occurred in that time.

Building on his previous work, Hollander and his team, which included Dr Wael Kafienah and Dr John Tarlton, announced in 2005 they had, for the first time ever, successfully grown human cartilage from a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells. It took just over a month to grow the cells into a half-inch length of cartilage and tests showed that the laboratory-grown cartilage was of a higher quality than any previous attempts at tissue engineering. Now the challenge was how to implant the engineered cartilage into the knee and get it to integrate with the surrounding tissue. The idea was to use cells to drive integration of one tissue with another, with the long-term aim of developing a way of fixing and integrating engineered cartilage with natural cartilage, literally ‘knitting’ the two surfaces together with cells.

via Bristol University | News from the University | A stem cell bandage for your knee.

Mountain Lion Receives Stem Cell Therapy

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 10:53 am

Mountain Lion Receives Stem Cell Therapy

mountain lion

A six-person veterinary team performs the procedure on big cat in Colorado. -Posted: Jan. 23, 2009, 3 a.m. EST

Elissa, 23, received regenerative (adult) stem cell therapy because of osteoarthritis in both of her elbows.

A 23-year-old feline named Elissa became the first mountain lion to receive stem cell therapy when Peak Performance Veterinary Group of Colorado Springs, Colo., recently performed regenerative stem cell therapy on her.

Elissa, the oldest mountain lion in protective care (She’s at Catamount Creek Rescue in Florissant, Colo.), successfully received RSCT injections from a team of six individuals. The crew, which consisted of four veterinarians, a veterinary technician specialist in anesthesia and an assistant, headed to the Rocky Mountains to perform the on-site procedure under the direction of Dr. James Gaynor of the veterinary group.

Since Elissa was rescued 12 years ago from an environment where she had been declawed and put on photography exhibition, she has been under the care of Chris Oldham. The big cat’s activity and comfort level started to decline because of osteoarthritis in both elbows.

Gaynor has performed numerous successful regenerative stem cell therapy procedures on canines. Though confident in the therapy and procedure method, he said, “The typical case for RSCT is an arthritic dog. Regenerative stem cell therapy is still an unexplored area of veterinary medicine when it comes to wildlife.”

Peak Performance Veterinary Group performs approximately 25 percent of canine regenerative stem cell therapy procedures in the United States. Gaynor added that while he is hopeful for a positive outcome for Elissa, it will take time to measure the results.

Elissa was sedated during the process, and her blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate were monitored.

via Mountain Lion Receives Stem Cell Therapy.

ADULT STEM CELL therapy for dogs, too

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 18, 2009 at 10:50 am

Stem cell therapy for dogs, too

Whatya do when your dog can’t walk up the stairs from hip dysplasia or arthritis? If your dog is part of your family as mine is to our family, you’d want the best for him. The Daily Gazette of Schenactady, NY does a nice piece on stem cell therapy for dogs. Here’s the way it works: Your vet extracts fat tissue from the dog and sends it to Vet-Stem, Inc. If all goes well, the stem cells are back to your vet just two days later and are injected back into the patient. So far in most cases, about 87% nationally, dogs became rejuvenated soon after receiving their injections. Now, if stem cell therapy can treat canine cancers, I’ll feel all fuzzy inside.

via Stem cell therapy for dogs, too | The Pluripotent.

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