DAVID GRANOVSKY

Archive for the ‘VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES’ Category

STEM CELLS MAKE VAGINAS!!

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 11, 2014 at 12:44 pm

MAKING VAGINAS FROM STEM CELLS, YES…ENTIRE VAGINAS, WORKING VAGINAS, ANATOMICALLY CORRECT IN FORM AND FUNCTION. WOW!

Georgia O'Keeffe

Georgia O’Keeffe

“Four women have had new vaginas grown in the laboratory and implanted by doctors in the US.

A tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold were used to grow vaginas in the right size and shape for each woman as well as being a tissue match.

They all reported normal levels of “desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction” and painless intercourse.

Experts said the study, published in the Lancet, was the latest example of the power of regenerative medicine.”
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-26885335

Belgian scientists repair bones with new stem cell technique – CBS News

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 16, 2014 at 12:49 pm

A piece of a three-dimensional bone structure obtained from the own adipose stem cells of a patient is seen at Brussels’ Saint Luc Hospital January 14, 2014. Belgian medical researchers have succeeded in repairing bones using stem cells from fatty tissue, with a new technique they believe could become a benchmark for treating a range of bone disorders. REUTERS

BRUSSELS  – Belgian medical researchers have succeeded in repairing bones using stem cells from fatty tissue, with a new technique they believe could become a benchmark for treating a range of bone disorders.

The team at the Saint Luc university clinic hospital in Brussels have treated 11 patients, eight of them children, with fractures or bone defects that their bodies could not repair, and a spin-off is seeking investors to commercialize the discovery.

Doctors have for years harvested stem cells from bone marrow at the top of the pelvis and injected them back into the body to repair bone.

The ground-breaking technique of Saint Luc’s centre for tissue and cellular therapy is to remove a sugar cube sized piece of fatty tissue from the patient, a less invasive process than pushing a needle into the pelvis and with a stem cell concentration they say is some 500 times higher.

The stem cells are then isolated and used to grow bone in the laboratory. Unlike some technologies, they are also not attached to a solid and separate ‘scaffold’.

“Normally you transplant only cells and you cross your fingers that it functions,” the centre’s coordinator Denis Dufrane told Reuters television.

His work has been published in Biomaterials journal and was presented at an annual meeting of the International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics and Science (IFATS) in New York in November.

 

2014-01-15T161731Z_858177456_GM1EA1F1UL301_RTRMADP_3_BELGIUM-MEDICINE.JPG

Belgian Professor Denis Defrane, coordinator of the centre of tissue and cellular therapy of Brussels’ Saint Luc Hospital, shows how a hole in the tibia of a patient suffering from a disease was treated on an x-ray, in Belgium January 14, 2014.
REUTERS

 

Bone Formation

“It is complete bone tissue that we recreate in the bottle and therefore when we do transplants in a bone defect or a bone hole…you have a higher chance of bone formation.”

The new material in a lab dish resembles more plasticine than bone, but can be molded to fill a fracture, rather like a dentist’s filling in a tooth, hardening in the body.

Some of those treated have included people recovering from tumors that had to be removed from bones. One 13-year-old boy, with a fracture and disorder that rendered him unable to repair bone, could resume sports within 14 months of treatment.

“Our hope is to propose this technology directly in emergency rooms to reconstitute bones when you have a trauma or something like that,” Dufrane said.

A spin-off founded last year called Novadip Biosciences will seek to commercialize the treatment, initially to allow spinal fusion among elderly people with degenerated discs.

It may also seek to create a bank of bone tissue from donors rather than the patients themselves.

IFATS president Marco Helder, based at Amsterdam’s VU university medical centre, said the novelty was the lack of solid scaffold.

“It is interesting and it is new, but it will have limitations regarding load-bearing capacity and, as with other implants, it will need to connect to the blood vessels of the body rapidly to avoid dying off,” he said, adding:

“Any foreign object can cause irritation and problems, so the fact that this is just host tissue would be an advantage.”

Belgian scientists repair bones with new stem cell technique – CBSNews.

 

RELATED STORY:

Critical size bone defect reconstruction by an autologous 3D osteogenic-like tissue derived from differentiated adipose MSCs.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23507085

STEM CELLS FIX HEART 5 YEARS AGO

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 17, 2013 at 9:18 am

AN UPDATE ON JAMES 11/17/2013

 “i have been doing manual labor with my dads company the heart is doing well im getting in better shape every week.

im to the piont now i can carry 5 gallon buckets of concrete up hills lol, pretty cool still
in a few days it will be my 6 year anniversary and still no reversion!!”
success

2006

Case Study: James Eilert, 34 years old, presents with a “widowmaker” [100 % blockage of the left ascending coronary artery]. His ejection fraction (EF – volume of blood his heart pumps out) was between 20 and 25 percent (55 is normal). His cardiologist told him he has about 5 years left to live.  James left the country in order to receive Adult Stem Cell treatment.

1 1/2 weeks after treatment – Echocardiogram revealed that his completely dead apex was beating again.

6 months after treatment – Sidewalls of heart beat normally.  Septum went from 100% damage to 30% damage. Cardiologist confirms James’ heart is 50 percent more elastic than the year before Repair Stem Cell therapy.

6 – 9 months after treatment – James’ total dead heart tissue is down to about 10%.  EF is up to 50%!

4 years later – James’ heart and health continue to improve. He continues to push himself and his limits.  He runs regularly, works 7 days a week and can bike 20 miles .

Summation:

James went from Class III congestive heart failure to Class I with an ejection fraction (EF) increase from ~20-25% to his current EF of 50%.  His doctors have lifted all restrictions and limitations on his physical activities.

James is only one of many adult stem cell treatment success stories…

November 17, 2011 Update:

A letter from James.  How is he doing today?

“its amazing how fast reality can change, the differences that you see in others that they dont notice themselves. the changes in attitudes and perceptions that the “new” was never in doubt and is accepted as if it were always true. the new studies showing the truth about adult stem cell heart treatments the last few months have proven that we the few pioneers that have made huge financial sacrifices to try and save our lives were not crazy, stupid or otherwise deluded!

it was a risk and for the last four years despite proving over and over by running uphill on so many treadmills my improvments were basically ignored by cardiologists, general practitioners, and even my own wife and stepdaughters.

that i am happy to say has changed!!!!

i went to see my doctor yesterday, he told me to start heavy weight training and interval running, to help me lose weight better. what was differnet? nobody has told me to do that since my heart attack, there was no mention of taking it easy, in fact before i was told to only do light weights and take it easy, watch my heart rate, dont push past 150bpm ever.

it was like i never even had a heart attack.

i asked in disbelief if i should watch my heart rate, keep it a safe zone. the answer “no, stick to 85 to 90 percent and youll be fine, your exercise scores and echos show you can handle it”

vindication, no longer an unexplained anamoly, just a patient that responded better than average to a new treatment – like it was always true in thier minds, never a doubt.

what a feeling!! it has taken ten years to go from the “fringe” to the mainstream - i look forward to getting treatments here in america, and i’m so happy i took the risk that now ensures i will be alive to reap the benifits when it becomes available here!

have a good day david – it nice to be right once in a while!
jim eilert

Congratulations as always Jim!  On your heart recovery success and on having the courage to be a pioneer with an adult stem cell treatment that was cutting edge around the world 5 years ago and is still barely know today in the USA! – David

Stem cell scarring aids recovery from spinal cord injury

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 5, 2013 at 2:45 pm

Scarring created by stem cells at the site of spinal cord injury actually assists in healing, instead of impeding it as previously thought! -dg

Stem Cell Scarring Aids Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury

Oct. 31, 2013 — In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that the scar tissue formed by stem cells after a spinal cord injury does not impair recovery; in fact, stem cell scarring confines the damage. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal Science, indicate that scar tissue prevents the lesion from expanding and helps injured nerve cells survive…

Stem cell scarring aids recovery from spinal cord injury.

CHILD RECEIVES NEW STEM CELL TRACHEA

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 30, 2013 at 2:44 pm
ht_ciaran_finn_lynch_trachea_transplant_ll_120725_wg

Two years ago, 11 year old Ciaran Finn-Lynch, became the world’s first child to receive new trachea.  Scientists/doctors used the child’s own stem cells to rebuild the airway in his body.  This is the really cool stuff because the public can wrap their heads around it and see a trachea in a dish, a nose growing on an arm, etc.  The next step in evolution of the public consciousness is to get them to understand…we can regrow and heal the organs which are already present in their own bodies, already damaged and in need of fixing…with stem cells from their own body.  I think this will be difficult as the home owner with the means will almost always go to the outside plumber or the super store and get a new piece of equipment to replace the old rather than pick up a wrench and fix what they have already.  Another byproduct of the disposable society we live in.  Homes, cars, washing machines and now organs are believed to have a limited life span.  When it breaks, just buy a new one.  - DG

Here’s the article from ScienceDaily:

Surgeons Transplant New Trachea Into Child Using His Own Stem Cells to Rebuild Airway

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100325114400.htm

Which was written based on materials from the University College of London release (what, you thought this was in the US?):

UCL surgeons perform revolutionary transplant operation

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1003/10031903

trachea

Here’s the 2 year follow-up:

Stem-cell-based, tissue engineered tracheal replacement in a child: a 2-year follow-up study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22841419

And the human interest story coverage of the same:

Stunning Recovery for First Child to Get Stem Cell Trachea

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/stunning-recovery-child-stem-cell-trachea/story?id=16858771

STEM CELLS COME TO THE USA!!!

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 23, 2013 at 9:00 am

usa-flag-grunge

 Stem Cells Come to the USA!

A real possibility is that all off shore facilities will go under shortly as people realize stem cells are coming to the USA.   Not only “the smart patient” but also “the smart investor” will return home.   Please forward to relevant parties and contact me if you want to know what the next step is to US based stem cell facilities and treatments.

DrugTrialsKUMedLeukemiaSociety-13-0-315-153 304

Brownback signs into law bill establishing adult stem cell research and treatment at KU Medical Center

Topeka — In a mix of science and anti-abortion politics, Gov. Sam Brownback on Monday signed into law a bill that establishes the nation’s first adult stem cell research and treatment center at the Kansas University Medical Center.

“I am honored to sign this bill of hope and promise and current treatments,” Brownback said.

Brownback described adult stem cell and umbilical cord blood research as an “exploding” area of new discoveries to treat people with a wide range of diseases. “KU will be the leader, Kansas will be the leader, which is fabulous in this burgeoning field,” he said.

But the bill carried political overtones.

It was sponsored by vehement abortion opponents and pushed by the Family Research Council, a conservative Christian lobbying group.

In addition, KU never asked for the legislation establishing what will be known as the Midwest Stem Cell Center, and the Legislature has yet to produce the estimated $1.1 million needed for the center’s startup.

Dr. Buddhadeb Dawn, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases at KU Medical Center, on Monday speaks during Gov. Sam Brownback’s bill-signing ceremony on legislation establishing the Midwest Stem Adult Stem Cell Center.  The center will be charged with working on adult stem cell, cord blood and related stem cell research, providing therapies to patients and serving as a clearinghouse for physicians on cutting-edge treatments.  The center is prohibited from using embryonic stem cells or cells taken from aborted fetal tissue.  Abortion opponents oppose human embryonic stem cell research because it involves the destruction of the embryo.

Dr. Buddhadeb Dawn, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases at KU Medical Center, was the only KU representative on hand at the bill-signing ceremony. He said the number of clinical trials of bone marrow stem cells for treatment of heart disease had been increasing tremendously over the past several years.

“It would be great to bring such therapies to Kansas, and the formation of such a center which would engage in adult stem cell therapy in patients would give Kansans the chance to be enrolled in such therapy and perhaps give treatment that would change their life,” he said.

David Prentice, senior fellow for life sciences at the Family Research Council, said the center “puts Kansas in a leadership position.”

State Sen. Mary Pilcher Cook, R-Shawnee, who carried the bill in the Legislature said she would push for funding the center when the Legislature returns May 8 for the wrap-up session.

“That’s all under discussion right now,” she said.

At the bill-signing ceremony, several people who have survived diseases spoke about their treatments and how they believed the new center would expand the availability of treatments for others.

Mary Rusco, of Wichita, said she received stem cells from an umbilical cord.

“I have been cancer free for four years now, and as far as I’m concerned I’m cured. I really appreciate the fact that Kansas is doing this so that other people can have access to this opportunity,” she said.

Terry Killman, of Independence, received a bone marrow transplant from his brother.

“This bill will make it that much better for more people to have the opportunity that I’ve had to live,” he said.

Summary of Senate Bill 199 ( .PDF )

KIDNEY BREAKTHROUGH: COMPLETE LAB GROWN ORGAN WORKS IN RATS

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 19, 2013 at 4:00 pm
A brand new rat kidney being built on the scaffold of an old one <i>(Image: Ott Lab, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital)</i>

A brand new rat kidney being built on the scaffold of an old one

(Image: Ott Lab, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital)

Kidney breakthrough: complete lab-grown organ works in rats

 

  • 18:00 14 April 2013 by Andy Coghlan

 

For the first time, complete lab-grown kidneys have been successfully transplanted into rats, filtering and discharging urine as a normal kidney would.

 

The breakthrough paves the way for human-scale versions, which could potentially provide an inexhaustible supply of organs, eliminating the need for recipients to wait for a matching donor kidney Movie Camera.

 

Similar techniques have already been applied successfully in people with simpler tissue, such as windpipes. But the kidney is by far the most complex organ successfully recreated.

 

“If this technology can be scaled to human-size grafts, patients suffering from renal failure, who are currently waiting for donor kidneys, could theoretically receive an organ grown on demand,” says Harald Ott, head of the team that developed the rat kidneys at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

 

“In an ideal world, such grafts could be produced from patient-derived cells, enabling us to overcome both donor organ shortages and the need for long-term immunosuppression drugs,” says Ott. Currently in the US alone, 18,000 transplants are carried out each year, but 100,000 Americans remain on waiting lists.

 

Strip and coat

 

To make the rat kidneys, Ott and his colleagues took kidneys from healthy “donor” rats and used a chemical solution to wash away the native cells, leaving behind the organ’s scaffold. Because this is made of collagen, a biologically inert material, there is no issue of the recipient’s body rejecting it.

 

Next, the team set about regrowing the “flesh” of the organ by coating the inner surfaces of the scaffold with new cells. In the case of humans, these would likely come from the recipient, so all the flesh would be their own.

 

The kidney was too complex to use the approach applied to the windpipe – in which its scaffold was coated by simply immersing it in a bath of the recipient’s cells.

 

Instead, the team placed the kidney scaffolds in glass chambers containing oxygen and nutrients, and attached tubes to the protruding ends of the renal artery, vein and ureter – through which urine normally exits the kidney. They recoated the insides of the blood vessels by flowing human stem cells through the tubes attached to the artery and vein. Through the ureter, they fed kidney cells from newborn rats, re-coating the labyrinthine tubules and ducts that make up the kidney’s urine filtration system.

 

It took many attempts to establish the precise pressures at which to feed the cells into the organ, as if it was growing in an embryonic rat. Remarkably, given the complexity of the kidney, the cells differentiated into exactly those required in the different compartments of the organ. “We found the correct cell types homed in to specific regions in the organ matrix,” says Ott.

 

The kidneys, which took about a fortnight to fully recoat, worked both in the lab and when transplanted into rats. They filtered out and discharged urine, although they did not sieve it as well as a natural kidney would. Ott is confident that the function can be improved by refining the technique.

 

Humans and pigs

 

The team is now attempting the same procedure using human kidneys, and also pig kidneys, which could be used to make scaffolds if there were a scarcity of human donors. The team has already successfully repopulated pig kidneys with human cells, but Ott says further studies are vital to guarantee that the pig components of the organ do not cause rejection when transplanted into humans.

 

The fact that heart valves and other “inert” tissues from pigs are already successfully used in humans without rejection suggests that this will not be a big problem.

 

Other researchers working in the field hailed the team’s success at recreating such a complex organ. “The researchers have taken a technique that most in the field thought would be impossible for complex organs such as the kidney, and have painstakingly developed a method to make it work,” says Jamie Davies at the University of Edinburgh, UK, who was part of a team that last year made some headway in their attempts to grow kidneys from scratch in the lab. “By showing that recellularisation is feasible even for complicated organs, their work will stimulate similar approaches to the engineering of other body systems.”

 

Journal reference: Nature Medicine, DOI: 10.1038/nm.3154

STEM CELL THERAPY INCREASES SUCCESS RATE OF LIVER TRANSPLANTS

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 20, 2013 at 9:00 am

Liver-transplant-006

Stem cell therapy is new hope for liver transplant patients

Stem cell therapy has been found useful in over 60 per cent of the patients due for liver transplant, as per a paper submitted by doctors at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital in Delhi recently. Not only is the treatment less cumbersome and risky, its cost is also comparatively very reasonable.

According to the paper’s principal author and chairman of the Department of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases at the Hospital, Dr. Anil Arora, a large number of patients requiring liver transplantation cannot afford it for two reasons – cost and donor availability.

In view of the logistical problems faced by such patients, Dr. Arora said: “We started looking at the feasibility of alternative methods like using reserve cells in the body for such treatment, as it costs even less.  Some of these cells can be mobilized from the bone marrow as it has the capacity to regenerate the cells. So we stimulate the bone marrow by an injection.”

“This injection is given for five days and it mobilizes the bone marrow and some of the cells. They then come into the blood circulation. In the study we tried to filter these cells from the blood marrow using a specialized filtering machine and the concentrate of these cells. About 5 ml to 10 ml of the blood containing these concentrated group of cells were then injected into the hepatic artery, which supplies blood to the liver,” explained Dr. Arora. He said this process was carried out by a number of different mechanisms and it proved quite successful. “We started about two years ago and finished last year. Then these patients were followed up for another one year and we were happy to see a significant proportion of the patients having substantial improvement in the liver functions as assessed by a score called ‘Child score’.”

Dr. Arora said, “All patients tolerated the treatment well without any side effects. Of the 10 patients, six to seven benefited. So we believe that more frequent administration of the stem cells in large number might have a more beneficial impact.”

While the study by the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital team was published this year and was approved by the Department of Biotechnology and Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India, Dr. Arora said there is also other published data now which calls for “stimulating the bone marrow and letting the cells automatically go into the liver”. By this, he said, you avoid filtering and putting the blood with the stem cells into the liver. “This is also equally beneficial.”

Dr. Arora said stem cell therapy “might act as a bridge for liver transplant” and can provide some time to the patients to arrange for treatment. But just like a damaged car tire, he said, a damaged liver after minor repairs has to be replaced. “However, if a person stops taking liquor or if the therapy goes on well, then a patient can lead a healthy life for many more years.”

http://www.thehindu.com

Stem Cells from Human Adipose Tissue Used to Chase Migrating Cancer Cells

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 15, 2013 at 11:21 am
Stemness of primary AMSC lines demonstrated with differentiation along three mesenchymal lineages, Adipocyte (a, d [48], g), Osteocyte (b [48], e, h), and Chondrocyte (c [48], f, i), documented via lineage specific staining with Oil Red O, Alizarin Red, and Collagen II, respectively. (Credit: Pendleton et al. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue vs Bone Marrow: In Vitro Comparison of Their Tropism towards Gliomas. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (3): e58198 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058198)
Using Fat to Fight Brain Cancer: Stem Cells from Human Adipose Tissue Used to Chase Migrating Cancer Cells

Mar. 12, 2013 — In laboratory studies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found that stem cells from a patient’s own fat may have the potential to deliver new treatments directly into the brain after the surgical removal of a glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain tumor.


The investigators say so-called mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have an unexplained ability to seek out damaged cells, such as those involved in cancer, and may provide clinicians a new tool for accessing difficult-to-reach parts of the brain where cancer cells can hide and proliferate anew. The researchers say harvesting MSCs from fat is less invasive and less expensive than getting them from bone marrow, a more commonly studied method.

A DOG’S LIFE SAVED THROUGH STEM CELL TREATMENT

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 6, 2013 at 9:00 am

This is Thelma. She is an adorable, friendly, 7 year old Boxer. Thelma was to be put down because she was suffering from Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) in her neck. It was ultimately decided however to try stem cell therapy, performed by Pet Central Animal Hospital in Minneapolis, MN. This is a video of her BEFORE MediVet America’s stem cell procedure…..
AFTER: This is the after video of Thelma’s AMAZING progress after just 9 weeks from being treated with stem cell therapy!
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