DAVID GRANOVSKY

Archive for November 14th, 2012|Daily archive page

ADULT STEM CELL POTENTIAL IN REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 14, 2012 at 7:57 pm

Adipose tissue embolus  Case 104

 

By expanding the use of adipose tissue and its stem cell components, scientist and surgeons have made significant strides in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. “The opportunities for regenerative medicine interventions based on adult stem cells are tremendous…” – Ivona Percec, MD, PhD

 

As researchers work on reconfiguring cells to take on new regenerative properties, a new review from Penn Medicine plastic surgeons sheds additional light on the potential power of adipose-derived stem cells – or adult stem cells harvested from fatty tissue – in reconstructive and regenerative medicine.

Fat-derived stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine November 9, 2012 in Surgery (Medical Xpress)—As researchers work on reconfiguring cells to take on new regenerative properties, a new review from Penn Medicine plastic surgeons sheds additional light on the potential power of adipose-derived stem cells – or adult stem cells harvested from fatty tissue – in reconstructive and regenerative medicine.

 

Reconstructive plastic surgeons have clinically integrated “fat grafting” into different surgeries for years, for breast, facial, and other reconstructive and restorative surgeries, with good success. Now, researchers are beginning to understand the power that fatty tissue holds. This new paper, published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal, enforces that adipose-derived stem cells can be routinely isolated from patients, and once molecular methods are worked out, may be useful for a multitude of regenerative medicine applications. “The opportunities for regenerative medicine interventions based on adult stem cells are tremendous. It is critically important for us to better understand the biology of these cells so that we can develop novel, safe and effective treatments for our patients using their own cells.” said the paper’s senior author, Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the division of Plastic Surgery in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Many groups are looking into different modes of isolating and modifying these cells for their regenerative properties, including experts at Penn’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine and around Penn Medicine. For example, Dr. Percec’s team is conducting translational research into the mechanisms controlling adipose-derived stem cells, and how they contribute to the normal human aging process. Stem cells can undergo multiple divisions without differentiation, making them useful tools for cell-replacement therapy. Embryonic stem cells can convert to any cell type, whereas adult stem cells, like the stem cells derived from fat, can differentiate into many, but not all, cell types. A person’s own fat tissue could then potentially be converted into cells specially designed to repair damage to the heart, cartilage, blood vessels, brain, muscle, or bone. As regenerative medicine techniques are refined, experts will continue to explore the utility and benefits of stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

 

Fat Grafting’s Past, Present and Future:  Why Adipose Tissue Is Emerging as a Critical Link to the Advancement of Regenerative Medicine  –  Ivona Percec, MD, PhD

medicalexpress.com

ONE IN THREE OPEN TO TRAVELING FOR MEDICAL TREATMENT

In HEALTH AND WELLNESS on November 14, 2012 at 12:31 pm

airplane

With the globalization of the Medical profession, and the advancements made abroad, medical tourism is becoming more common and accepted. “Various studies using different criteria have estimated that anywhere between 60,000 to 750,000 U.S. residents travel abroad for health care each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

NEW YORK | Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:22am EST

NEW YORK(Reuters) – Looking for an affordable face lift without breaking the bank? Want to combine a tummy tuck with two weeks in the sun? You’re not alone. Nearly a third of people surveyed around the world say they are open to the idea of medical tourism – traveling abroad to enjoy cheaper medical or dental treatment, according to a new Ipsos poll of 18,731 adults in 24 countries. Indeed, 18 percent said they would definitely consider it. “The concept of medical tourism is well accepted in many countries,” said Nicolas Boyon, senior vice president of Ipsos Public Affairs.

“With the exception of Japan there are at least one-third of consumers in every country we covered that are open to the idea,” he said in an interview.

Whether for economic reasons or perceptions of superior treatment elsewhere, for treatments ranging from cosmetic to life-saving surgeries, Indians, Indonesians, Russians, Mexicans and Poles were the most open to the idea of being medically mobile. Thirty-one percent or more people in each of those countries said they would definitely consider traveling for a medical or dental treatment.

Conversely, people in Japan, South Korea, Spain and Sweden were least likely to be medical tourists. Boyon said it was not surprising that men and women from emerging nations would be medically mobile if the treatments were cheaper. “This probably reflects perceptions of medical care in other countries that is superior to what is available at home,” he said. But he was intrigued by the percentage of people in developed nations such as Italy, where 66 percent said they would definitely or probably consider medical tourism, along with Germany (48 percent), Canada (41 percent) and the United States, where 38 percent of people were open to the idea.

“It is a reflection that the medical profession is no longer protected from globalization,” Boyon said.

RISKS VS. BENEFITS

Although medical tourism spans a range of treatments, the most common are dental care, cosmetic surgery, elective surgery and fertility treatment, according to a OECD report.

“The medical tourist industry is dynamic and volatile and a range of factors including the economic climate, domestic policy changes, political instability, travel restrictions, advertising practices, geo-political shifts, and innovative and pioneering forms of treatment may all contribute towards shifts in patterns of consumption and production of domestic and overseas health services,” the report said.

Various studies using different criteria have estimated that anywhere between 60,000 to 750,000 U.S. residents travel abroad for health care each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Along with variations among countries, the Ipsos survey showed that younger adults under 35 years of age were more likely in most countries to consider medical tourism, than people 50 to 64 years old. In India, 86 percent of young adults said they would consider medical tourism, along with 77 percent in China, and 71 percent in Italy.

Boyon suggested that the cost of travel, proximity, borders and quality of care may also be factors considered by potential medical tourists. In both Italy and Germany, about 20 percent of adults said they would definitely consider medical tourism. Both countries are near Hungary, a popular destination for health treatments. Ipsos conducted the poll in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States.

“Ipsos” is a global independent market research company ranking third worldwide among research firms.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/11/13/us-medicaltourism-idUSBRE8AC0Q220121113?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews

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