DAVID GRANOVSKY

OHIO COUPLE HOPES BABY’S MARROW WILL SAVE SISTER, 1990, 92, 95 & 2008

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS FROM THE PAST, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 27, 2009 at 2:38 am

THRIVING: Mary Ayala poses with daughters Marissa, left, and Anissa. Marissa saved the life of her sister Anissa with a bone marrow transplant in 1991.

THRIVING: Mary Ayala poses with daughters Marissa, left, and Anissa. Marissa saved the life of her sister Anissa with a bone marrow transplant in 1991.

1995

OHIO COUPLE HOPES BABY’S MARROW WILL SAVE SISTER

Published: Monday, April 3, 1995 12:00 a.m. MDT

The final stage has just begun for a couple who decided to have another child in order to give their 6-year-old daughter a chance to survive leukemia.

Christy Schwartz received high doses of chemotherapy over the weekend. She also will receive intensive radiation treatments to prepare her for a bone marrow transplant on Thursday.The procedure would kill Christy without the transplant.

“She is almost going to be dead and brought back,” her mother said.

Doctors say there is a 20 percent to 30 percent chance a transplant will cure Christy, who was diagnosed with leukemia when she was 11 months old.

She will receive stem cells extracted from her little sister Angelina’s umbilical cord just days after her birth in November. Stem cells are a component of marrow that create new blood cells.

Angelina, now four months old, is the fourth child of Jill and Randy Schwartz. They decided to conceive her after learning that no other family member’s bone marrow matched Christy’s, and that no suitable donor could be found in the National Bone Marrow Registry.

The couple got the idea after Jill Schwartz read about the Ayala family of San Bernardino, Calif., whose teenage daughter, Anissa, had leukemia. In 1991, Anissa received bone marrow from her baby sister, Marissa, who was conceived to provide a match despite criticism from medical ethicists.

That transplant was successful. Anissa is now 22, and still in remission. Marissa is 4.

There was only a one-in-four chance Angelina’s marrow would match Christy’s. A test 16 weeks into Jill Schwartz’s pregnancy confirmed they had beaten the odds.

“Ethically this is OK, as long as their motives are mixed: They want the child and they want to save their other kid,” said Dr. Arthur L. Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.

via Deseret News Archive | OHIO COUPLE HOPES BABY’S MARROW WILL SAVE SISTER.

1990

It was at City of Hope that Anissa Ayala of Hacienda Heights, California was received a miracle in the 1990s. Diagnosed with acute leukemia, doctors and researchers were able to use umbilical cord cells from her younger sister Marissa to stop the spread of the leukemia and give Anissa a second chance at life. – http://scottrobinsonhondainthecommunity.com/

1992

Lifesaving Tot Again Helps Sister – As A Flower Girl

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. – Anissa Ayala and her little sister, Marissa Eve, walk down the aisle this evening as bride and flower girl, one year after a bone-marrow transplant to which both owe their lives.

Marissa, now 2 1/2, was conceived to donate marrow to her big sister, who suffered from a deadly form of leukemia.

“Four years ago, things looked so gloomy, and now Anissa’s doing great,” her father, Abe Ayala, said on the eve of the wedding. “We’re being so rewarded. It’s amazing.”

Anissa, 20, and Bryan Espinosa, 25, are to marry before 350 guests at a Victorian mansion in this city 50 miles east of Los Angeles.

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19920605&slug=1495590

Ayala sisters appear on national TV -Siblings recently profiled in the Register regarding landmark bone-marrow transplant featured on ‘Good Morning America.’
By GREG HARDESTY – Wednesday, July 30, 2008 -The Orange County Register

PLACENTIA – Two sisters recently profiled in the Register regarding their landmark bone-marrow transplant 17 years ago appeared live on a national television program this morning  and kicked off a campaign to raise money for cancer research.

To view the seven-plus-minute segment on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” click here http://abcnews.go.com/gma. In the middle of the page, under the “Recently on GMA” and “Today” headline, click on the item headlined, “Having a Child to Save Your Child.”

Anissa Ayala, 36, of Placentia, and Marissa Ayala, 18, of Walnut, made the cover of Time magazine in 1991 for what was then a controversial and landmark donor story.

Marissa was conceived to save the life of her sister, who had leukemia, and was 14 months old when her marrow was transplanted into Anissa, then 19.

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