DAVID GRANOVSKY

Archive for February 19th, 2009|Daily archive page

Korean Funding for Stem Cell Research Dwindling

In ALL ARTICLES, CATCH UP!, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 19, 2009 at 10:28 pm

“Korean researchers are regarded as world class in stem cell therapy to treat brain and vascular diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and atherosclerosis.”  The US is barely out of the starting blocks.  Why is that? -DG

korea

korea

Updated Feb.20,2009 11:34 KST

Stem cell research funding from the Korean government decreased from W35 billion in 2007 to W34.4 billion last year, according to the Postech Biotech Center (US$1=W1,480).

Meanwhile, the United States invested at least W1 trillion on stem cell research, and the United Kingdom W139 billion. Japan spent W127 billion and France W63 billion. Even Singapore and South Africa made greater investment than Korea, with W46 billion and W44 billion.

Korean researchers are regarded as world class in stem cell therapy to treat brain and vascular diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and atherosclerosis. Clinical trials of stem cell therapy are expected in Korea within one or two years.

via Digital Chosunilbo (English Edition) : Daily News in English About Korea.

QOTD – Audrey Hepburn

In ALL ARTICLES, QUOTE OF THE DAY on February 19, 2009 at 10:22 pm

Click Here

audrey-hepburn

audrey-hepburn

Remember, if you ever need a helping hand, you’ll find one at the end of your arm. . . As you grow older you will discover that you have two hands. One for helping yourself, the other for helping others.

Audrey Hepburn

https://i1.wp.com/fileserver.tinker.com/tinker/events/6/6188_main_image_1248125135.jpg

http://8piece.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/audrey-hepburn-hair.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/therecshow.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/audrey-hepburn.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/elcpartnersinenglish.pbworks.com/f/audrey-hepburn-by-sarah123.jpg

AMID THE GRIEVING, A RARE ACT OF SPORTSMANSHIP

In ALL ARTICLES on February 19, 2009 at 10:14 pm

This has NOTHING to do with stem cells…it just makes this world a better place to live in. -DG

The coach never considered any other option.

It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.

Something else was on Dave Rohlman‘s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

It was a Saturday night in February, and the Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools, who were developing a friendly rivalry that spanned two states.

The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and soda. But the game itself almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin had been in remission after a five-year fight with cervical cancer, but she began to hemorrhage that morning while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Her son and several of his teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the decision was made to turn off the life-support system. Carlitha Franklin was just 39.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”


They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.
? Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.

Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

Basketball is a second sport for the 18-year-old Franklin, who says he has had some scholarship nibbles and plans to play football in college. He just has a few games left for the Knights, who are 6-11 and got beat 71-36 Tuesday night by Milwaukee Hamilton.

It hasn’t been the greatest season for the team, but they have stuck together through a lot of adversity.

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 19, 2009 at 6:45 pm
Adult stem cells work now. End of story.
science1
Scientists Await Action on Stem Cells
Some Proponents Had Expected Obama to Immediately Reverse Bush Policies

By Rob Stein – Washington Post Staff Writer – Thursday, February 19, 2009; Page A02

At the National Institutes of Health, officials have started drafting guidelines they will need to start funding human embryonic stem cell research that has been off-limits for nearly eight years.

At the University of California at San Francisco, scientists are poised to dismantle the cumbersome bureaucracy they created to segregate experiments that were acceptable under the federal restrictions from studies that were not.

At the Harvard Stem Cell Institute in Cambridge, Mass., graduate students and other scientists paid with federal grants are eagerly awaiting the day when they can contribute their eureka moments to projects that are forbidden under the current policy.

But in the month since Inauguration Day, the moment they have been awaiting has not come, prompting some to ask: When will President Obama deliver on his campaign promise to lift one of the most contentious policies imposed by his predecessor?…

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/18/AR2009021803174.html?wprss=rss_technology

New Therapy With Stem Cells To Treat Crohn’s Disease

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 19, 2009 at 6:29 pm

crohn's disease

crohn's disease

New Therapy With Stem Cells To Treat Crohn’s Disease

ScienceDaily (Feb. 19, 2009) — Cellular therapy with stem cells is revolutionizing the focus of treatment of many serious diseases. Replacing the cells of damaged tissue with other new cells from the same patient is already a reality. This is the basis of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine, the latest great advance in biomedicine.

In this line, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona is exploring an innovative cellular therapy that uses stem cells to treat Crohn’s disease, a chronic genetic disease that affects 1% of the population in Spain and which has considerable impact on the quality of life of the patients. The procedure is based on an autologous bone-marrow transplant (when patients receive a transplant of their own stem cells) and now constitutes a treatment option to cure an intestinal disease that sometimes does not successfully respond to drugs and requires highly complex surgery that does not provide a cure.

With this therapy, in an average follow-up period of 6 years, 80% of transplant patients are in a phase of total remission of the disease and the remaining 20% have shown considerable improvement following the transplant, and are now responding favorably to drugs.

via New Therapy With Stem Cells To Treat Crohn’s Disease.

%d bloggers like this: