DAVID GRANOVSKY

Archive for February 15th, 2009|Daily archive page

QOTD: ALL OF LIFE IS A JOURNEY…

In ALL ARTICLES, QUOTE OF THE DAY on February 15, 2009 at 11:11 pm

“All of life is a journey which paths we take, what we look back on, and what we look forward to is up to us. We determine our destination, what kind of road we will take to get there, and how happy we are when we get there.”

Australian Quadriplegic Thanks Maverick Indian Stem Cell Doctor for Ability to Breathe

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 15, 2009 at 2:49 pm
SUPERMAN

CHRISTOPHER REEVE

CHRISTOPHER REEVE

Australian Quadriplegic Thanks Maverick Indian Stem Cell Doctor for Ability to Breathe

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

A man who is paralyzed from the neck down says he can now breathe on his own after having controversial embryonic stem cell treatment in India.

Perry Cross is the most high-profile patient to have traveled to India to be injected with the cells – which are banned in his own country Australia and most of the West.

He was left a quadriplegic after being injured playing rugby when just 19 years old and has no movement below his neck.

He has to be connected to a ventilator to breathe and has spent the past 14 years searching for treatment which might help him regain any movement.

During this time, Mr. Cross met Superman actor Christopher Reeve and became the actor’s ambassador for stem cell research in Australia.

via FOXNews.com – Australian Quadriplegic Thanks Maverick Indian Stem Cell Doctor for Ability to Breathe – Science News | Science & Technology | Technology News.

Stem Cells – Australian First For Melbourne Scientists

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 15, 2009 at 2:34 pm
australia - kangaroo

australia - kangaroo

Australian First For Melbourne Stem Cell Scientists – iPSC

February 1, 2009 — Melbourne scientists have created Australia’s first induced pluripotent stem cell lines. Scientists have derived the cells from skin cells, and reprogrammed them to behave as (if they had the pluripotent capability also found in) embryonic stem cells; a … > full story

via Search ScienceDaily.

Biologists Find Stem Cell-like Functions In Other Types Of Plant Cells

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 2:32 pm
RARE GHOST ORCHID

RARE GHOST ORCHID

January 30, 2009 — Ordinary cells have the ability to replace lost organs in plants — a function previously thought to be limited to stem cells — researchers have … > full story

Stem Cells Stand Up For Themselves

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 2:27 pm

STEM CELLS STAND UP FOR THEMSELVES

STEM CELLS STAND UP FOR THEMSELVES

Stem Cells Stand Up For Themselves

August 26, 2008 — Adult stem cells are not pampered pushovers. O’Reilly et al. report in the Aug. 25 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology that certain stem cells take charge of their surroundings, molding their … > full story

Regulating Hematopoietic Stem Cell Homeostasis And Leukemogenesis

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 2:26 pm

Regulating Hematopoietic Stem Cell Homeostasis And Leukemogenesis

April 14, 2008 — Scientists identify the c-Cbl protein as a critical repressor of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. In addition to establishing a key role for protein ubiquitylation in HSC development, this … > full story

STEM CELLS FROM MONKEY TEETH = NEW BRAIN CELLS!

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 15, 2009 at 2:24 pm

ORANGUTAN TEETH

ORANGUTAN TEETH

Stem Cells From Monkey Teeth Can Stimulate Growth And Generation Of Brain Cells

November 12, 2008 — Researchers have discovered dental pulp stem cells can stimulate growth and generation of several types of neural cells. Findings suggest dental pulp stem cells show promise for use in cell therapy … > full story

MONKEY TEETH

MONKEY TEETH

Stem Cells: Molecules Self-assemble To Provide New Therapeutic Treatments

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 10:42 am
Molecules Self-assemble To Provide New Therapeutic Treatments

ScienceDaily (Feb. 14, 2009) — Researchers in the laboratory of Samuel I. Stupp at Northwestern University have an interesting approach for tackling some major health problems: gather raw materials and then let them self-assemble into structures that can address a multitude of medical needs.

At the core of the research are peptide amphiphiles (PA), small synthetic molecules that Stupp first developed seven years ago, which have been essential in his work on regenerative medicine. By tailoring these molecules and combining them with others, the researchers can make a wide variety of structures that may provide new treatments for medical issues including spinal cord injuries, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.

Ramille M. Capito, a research assistant professor in Stupp’s lab, shared an overview of this work in a presentation titled “Exploration of Novel Materials and Nanotubes in Stem Cell Therapy,” as part of the “Adult Stem Cells: From Scientific Process to Patient Benefit” symposium on Feb. 14, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Chicago.

As a postdoctoral fellow in Stupp’s group, Capito recently discovered that combining the PA molecules with hyaluronic acid (HA), a biopolymer readily found in the human body in places like joints and cartilage, resulted in an instant membrane structure in the form of self-assembling sacs. The sac membrane was found to have hierarchical order from the nanoscale to microscale giving it unique physical properties. These findings were first published last year in the journal Science (Capito et al, Science 2008; 319:1812-6).

In creating a sac, Capito took advantage of the fact that HA molecules are larger and heavier than the smaller PA molecules. In a deep vial, she pipetted the PA solution and onto that injected the HA solution. As the heavier molecules sank, the lighter molecules engulfed them, creating a closed sac with the HA solution trapped inside the membrane.

Having formed the sacs, Capito next studied human stem cells engulfed by the self-assembly process inside sacs that she placed in culture. She found that the cells remained viable for up to four weeks, that a large protein — a growth factor important in the signaling of stem cells — could cross the membrane, and that the stem cells were able to differentiate.

In a clever demonstration of self-repair, if the sac’s membrane had a hole (from a needle injection, for example), Capito simply placed a drop of the PA solution on the tear, which interacted with the HA inside, resulting in self-assembly and a sealed hole.

While the underlying, highly ordered structures of the sacs and membranes have dimensions on the nanoscale, the sacs and membranes themselves can be of any dimension and are visible to the naked eye.

These sacs can be tailored to include bioactive regions, allowing researchers to incorporate a variety of designs into one sac structure. This capability opens the door to the creation of new methods for stem cell delivery. Stem cells can be loaded in the sac, which can be tailored to release the cells at the point of injury.

Previous work has shown that the PA molecules can be dissolved to form fibril structures with diameters of 5 to 8 nanometers. These gel structures can be used for regenerative medicine, and the research group has in vivo data for spinal cord repair, angiogenesis and bone and cartilage regeneration.

Of stem cells, what would Gandhi say? (2005)

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS FROM THE PAST, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 15, 2009 at 9:58 am

Of stem cells, what would Gandhi say?
By Pankaj Mishra
Published: MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 2005

LONDON: In 2001, President George W. Bush restricted U.S. federal financing for stem cell research. The decision, which was shaped at least partly by the Republican Party’s evangelical Christian base, and which disappointed many American scientists and businessmen, provoked joy in India.

The weekly newsmagazine India Today, read mostly by the country’s ambitious middle class, spoke of a “new pot of gold” for Indian science and businesses. “If Indians are smart,” the magazine said, American qualms about stem cell research “can open an opportunity to march ahead.”

Just four years later, this seems to have occurred. According to Ernst & Young’s Global Biotechnology Report in 2004, Indian biotechnology companies are expected to grow tenfold in the next five years, creating more than a million jobs. With more than 10,000 highly trained and cheaply available scientists, the country is one of the leading biotechnology powers along with Korea, Singapore, China, Japan, Sweden, Britain and Israel.

A top Indian corporation, the Reliance Group, owns Reliance Life Sciences, which is trying to devise new treatments for diabetes and Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and create human skin, blood and replacement organs genetically matched to their intended recipients.

Some scientists have even more ambitious ideas. Encouraged by the cloning of a sheep by British scientists in 1996, they plan to do the same with endangered species of Indian lions and cheetahs.
excerpted from http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/08/21/news/india.php?page=1

QOTD: EMPTY YOUR CUP…

In ALL ARTICLES on February 15, 2009 at 3:00 am


* Emptiness the starting point. — “In order to taste my cup of water you must first empty your cup. My friend, drop all you preconceived and fixed ideas and be neutral. Do you know why this cup is useful? Because it is empty.”

Striking Thoughts – Bruce Lee’s Wisdom for Daily Living (2000) edited by John Little

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