DAVID GRANOVSKY

ULTRASOUND GOES INSIDE LIVE CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on February 17, 2017 at 9:06 am

Researchers at The University of Nottingham have developed a break-through technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells…like ultrasound on the body, ultrasound in the cells causes no damage and requires no toxic chemicals to work. Because of this we can see inside cells that one day might be put back into the body, for instance as stem-cell transplants

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Researchers at The University of Nottingham have developed a break-through technique that uses sound rather than light to see inside live cells, with potential application in stem-cell transplants and cancer diagnosis.

The new nanoscale ultrasound technique uses shorter-than-optical wavelengths of sound and could even rival the optical super-resolution techniques which won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

This new kind of sub-optical phonon (sound) imaging provides invaluable information about the structure, mechanical properties and behaviour of individual living cells at a scale not achieved before.

Researchers from the Optics and Photonics group in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, are behind the discovery, which is published in the paper ‘High resolution 3D imaging of living cells with sub-optical wavelength phonons’ in the journal, Scientific Reports.

“People are most familiar with ultrasound as a way of looking inside the body — in the simplest terms we’ve engineered it to the point where it can look inside an individual cell. Nottingham is currently the only place in the world with this capability,” said Professor Matt Clark, who contributed to the study.

In conventional optical microscopy, which uses light (photons), the size of the smallest object you can see (or the resolution) is limited by the wavelength.

For biological specimens, the wavelength cannot go smaller than that of blue light because the energy carried on photons of light in the ultraviolet (and shorter wavelengths) is so high it can destroy the bonds that hold biological molecules together damaging the cells.

Optical super-resolution imaging also has distinct limitations in biological studies. This is because the fluorescent dyes it uses are often toxic and it requires huge amounts of light and time to observe and reconstruct an image which is damaging to cells.

Unlike light, sound does not have a high-energy payload. This has enabled the Nottingham researchers to use smaller wavelengths and see smaller things and get to higher resolutions without damaging the cell biology.

“A great thing is that, like ultrasound on the body, ultrasound in the cells causes no damage and requires no toxic chemicals to work. Because of this we can see inside cells that one day might be put back into the body, for instance as stem-cell transplants,” adds Professor Clark.

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More information is available from Professor Matt Clark in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham on +44 (0)115 951 5536, matt.clark@nottingham.ac.uk; or Emma Lowry, Media Relations Manager, on +44 (0)115 846 7156, emma.lowry@nottingham.ac.uk

Our academics can now be interviewed for broadcast via our Media Hub, which offers a Globelynx fixed camera and ISDN line facilities at University Park campus. For further information please contact a member of the Communications team on +44 (0)115 951 5798, email mediahub@nottingham.ac.uk or see the Globelynx website for how to register for this service.

About The University of Nottingham: The University of Nottingham has 43,000 students and is ‘the nearest Britain has to a truly global university, with a “distinct” approach to internationalisation, which rests on those full-scale campuses in China and Malaysia, as well as a large presence in its home city.’ (Times Good University Guide 2016). It is also one of the most popular universities in the UK among graduate employers and winner of both ‘University of the Year for Graduate Employment’, according to the 2017 The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide and ‘Outstanding Support for Early Career Researchers’ at the Times Higher Education Awards 2015. It is ranked in the world’s top 75 by the QS World University Rankings 2015/16. More than 97 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is recognised internationally and it is 8th in the UK by research power according to the Research Excellence Framework 2014. It has been voted the world’s greenest campus for four years running, according to Greenmetrics Ranking of World Universities.

LONG TERM REMISSION OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS WITH STEM CELLS

In Daily Dose of Stem Cells, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 16, 2017 at 12:36 pm

While high-dose immunosuppressive therapy is not without complications, we must remember that research is rarely linear and every step closer is a step closer – we learn a bit more and refine the process with each step as our understanding of all of the elements which make up our health, recover and illness are slowly puzzled together like a patch-work quilt…

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Stem cell transplants may induce long-term remission of multiple sclerosis

Encouraging results help set stage for larger studies.

New clinical trial results provide evidence that high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by transplantation of a person’s own blood-forming stem cells can induce sustained remission of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the central nervous system.

Five years after receiving the treatment, called high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (HDIT/HCT), 69 percent of trial participants had survived without experiencing progression of disability, relapse of MS symptoms or new brain lesions. Notably, participants did not take any MS medications after receiving HDIT/HCT. Other studies have indicated that currently available MS drugs have lower success rates.

The trial, called HALT-MS, was sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded Immune Tolerance Network (ITN). The researchers published three-year results from the study in December 2014, and the final five-year results appear online Feb. 1 in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Related:

12/12/2013 – Dr Oz and Dr Tisch discuss MS and stem cells http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/meredith-vieiras-family-health-battle?

NOT FDA APPROVED, NOT INSURANCE COVERED SO IT MUST BE BAD!

In BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS, HOPE AND INSPIRATION, OFF THE BEATEN PATH, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 9, 2017 at 5:37 pm
failure-missed-opps

NOT FDA APPROVED, NOT INSURANCE COVERED SO IT MUST BE BAD!

Someone reminded me that most stem cell treatments and immunotherapies aren’t FDA approved or covered by insurance in the USA.
 
This is true, but…
we’ve known about the rampant capacity for stem cells regenerating/regrowing finger tips since the work of Dr Illingsworth in the early 70’s. Children under 8 regrew their fingertips unassisted. That was their natural stem cells in their own bodies regenerating the distal phalanx, blood vessels, skin, nail, etc. but our natural healing system is not FDA approved.
 
We’ve known about bone marrow derived stem cell treatments in the form of bone marrow transplants for Leukemia/blood cancers. They regrow the patients immune system and are approved and have been used successfully in the USA for 60 years.
 
We know of stem cell treatments recovering patients from many chronic and terminal diseases successfully around the world for over 2-3 decades but that is only outside of our country and medical system for what I think are probably obvious reasons.
 
We know immunotherapy, like the 2 bubble babies cured and out of bubbles in 2001 and the Cuban originated lung cancer vaccine has been working for decades and treated thousands successfully but that is years from getting approvals here.
 
Sadly, as you said, many of these treatments – which merely expand on and accentuate the natural regenerative capacity and natural immune response capacity of the human body – are not covered by insurance or FDA approved.
 
I guess the only question I have is:
If these treatments have worked years to decades everywhere else they are used…
Is this a failing of the treatments or of the FDA and insurance…

Only you can decide.

 
“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” – Edison

“All that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combated, suppressed — only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle.” – Tesla

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” – Winston Churchill

“The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter—for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.” – Tesla

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