DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘myocard’

Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on August 3, 2010 at 9:26 am

“A medical research team led by University of Miami doctors injected stem cells into the hearts of pigs that had been damaged by heart attacks. Within two months, the doctors said, the stem cells made the pigs’ hearts good as new.”

Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage

August 2, 2010 By Fred Tasker

A medical research team led by University of Miami doctors injected stem cells into the hearts of pigs that had been damaged by heart attacks. Within two months, the doctors said, the stem cells made the pigs’ hearts good as new.

For humans, the research represents another promising step toward healing the damage from heart attacks, the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, killing more than 800,000 people a year.

The treatment resulted in rapid healing in the pigs, said Dr. Joshua Hare, a cardiologist at UM Medical School and director of its Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, where research was done.

“In two weeks, their heart function was almost back to normal. In two months, they were absolutely back to normal,” he said. “If we can achieve even 50 percent of that in humans, it will have a major impact.”

Hare said he hopes that within a decade, the procedure might be routine in humans, and that similar therapy might be available for the liver, kidney, pancreas, brain, even for strokes and limbs badly injured in battle.

The new study, published in the July 29 issue of Circulation Research, a journal of the American Heart Association, builds on another UM study published in December. In that study, immature “mesenchymnal” human stem cells extracted from bone marrow and infused into the hearts of human heart-attack victims made their hearts less prone to dangerous arrhythmias and better able to pump blood.

That study prompted widespread debate among scientists over how the stem cells were able to promote healing in the heart. The greatest significance of the new research that it explains the healing process, Hare says.

“Scientists always want to know why,” he said. “You can’t really go forward with research unless you understand what’s going on.”

Dr. Robert Simari, vice chairman of cardiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who had read the study but did not take part in it, supported its significance.

“This is a unique insight,” he said. “The field has been hindered by a lack of understanding of this mechanism. This shines new light on how these things work.”

The new UM study found that the stem cells helped the heart in two ways. First, some of the stem cells — injected into the heart via catheter into the groin and up the femoral artery — actually turned into new, healthy heart cells themselves. They replaced heart tissue killed by the heart attack, and became part of the heart muscle that contracts and beats to circulate the blood.

Another part of the injected stem cells didn’t turn into new heart cells but instead induced stem cells already existing in the heart to greatly multiply, building more heart muscle.

Doctors had known the human heart contained some of its own stem cells, whose function is to repair and regenerate the heart. The heart’s stem cells work like the stem cells in hair follicles, which induce the hair to grow back after a haircut, Hare said. But the heart was thought to have too few of them to fully repair itself.

In the new experiment, the injected stem cells caused an explosion of growth in the heart’s own stem cells, which turned into heart muscle cells.

“They helped create 20 times the number of the body’s own heart stem cells,” Hare said.

The study demonstrates another way to use immature human stem cells that avoids the use of embryonic stem cells, which are controversial because creating them destroys human embryos.

Another advantage is that the experiment worked with stem cells from the bone marrow of unrelated donors, which — for reasons not entirely clear yet — do not seem to carry the same risk of rejection by the recipient’s body, which is a serious problem with heart and kidney transplants.

Stem cells extracted from the patient’s own bone marrow also can be used, but they need three weeks of purification and proliferation to be ready, delaying treatment for the ailing heart.

New studies are under way to see which method — using cells from a donor or the patient — works better, Hare said.

(c) 2010, The Miami Herald.
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

via Stem-cell experiment on pigs seen as step forward in repairing heart damage.

The acute and long-term effects of intracoronary Stem cell Transplantation in 191 patients with chronic heARt failure: the STAR-heart study — Eur J Heart Fail

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 28, 2010 at 5:14 pm

Another study that proves that “Intracoronary BMC (bone marrow [stem] cell) therapy improves ventricular performance, quality of life and survival in patients with heart failure.”

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The acute and long-term effects of intracoronary Stem cell Transplantation in 191 patients with chronic heARt failure: the STAR-heart study

1. Bodo-Eckehard Strauer*,

2. Muhammad Yousef and

3. Christiana M. Schannwell

+ Author Affiliations

1.

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology, Heinrich-Heine-University of Düsseldorf, Moorenstr 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany

1. *Corresponding author. Tel: +49 211 8104848 Fax: +49 211 8118396 Email: strauer@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

* Received February 11, 2010.

* Revision received April 12, 2010.

* Accepted April 16, 2010.

Abstract

Aims Despite accumulated evidence that intracoronary bone marrow cell (BMC) therapy may be beneficial in acute myocardial infarction, there are only limited data available on the effectiveness of BMC’s in chronic heart failure. The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate ventricular haemodynamics, geometry, and contractility as well as the long-term clinical outcome of BMC treated patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) due to chronic ischaemic cardiomyopathy.

Methods and results Patients with chronic heart failure (n = 391 LVEF ≤35%) due to ischaemic cardiomyopathy were enrolled in the present study. Of these, 191 patients (mean NYHA class 3.22) underwent intracoronary BMC therapy. The control group (mean NYHA class 3.06) consisted of 200 patients with comparable LVEF. Assessments of haemodynamics at rest and exercise, quantitative ventriculography, spiroergometry, 24 h Holter ECG, late potentials, and heart rate variability were analysed. Over 3 months to 5 years after intracoronary BMC therapy there was a significant improvement in haemodynamics (e.g. LVEF, cardiac index), exercise capacity, oxygen uptake, and LV contractility. Importantly, there was a significant decrease in long-term mortality in the BMC treated patients compared with the control group.

Conclusion Intracoronary BMC therapy improves ventricular performance, quality of life and survival in patients with heart failure. These effects were present when BMC were administered in addition to standard therapeutic regimes. No side effects were observed.

via The acute and long-term effects of intracoronary Stem cell Transplantation in 191 patients with chronic heARt failure: the STAR-heart study — Eur J Heart Fail.

The Science Behind “Super Stemmys – Doris and the Supercells”

In ALL ARTICLES on April 28, 2010 at 9:02 am

A brief epilogue regarding the scientific information portrayed in “Super Stemmys – Doris and the Supercells” …

Much of the book was based on my time spent at the first non-clinical trial stem cell treatment facility in the world in 2004.  What I saw practiced and researched there at that time and in the next few years was the use of stem cells that were autologous (patient derived) from the bone marrow and non-differentiated (non-specific).  The cells were then differentiated into cardiac stem cells and then introduced into the heart muscle via injection.  Symptom reduction and therapeutic benefit was reported in about 65-72% of patients.

This is similar to the “Injection of Autologous CD34-Positive (stem) Cells  for Neovascularization and Symptom Relief in Patients With Myocardial Ischemia” trial that was researched in the US in 2004 at [Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, California], [Caritas St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston] and [Minneapolis Heart Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota] http://clinicaltrial.gov/ct2/show/NCT00081913?term=stem+cell+heart&rank=58

The book is as accurate as possible given that:
*adult stem cell treatment therapy for chronic disease is a relatively new science
*new discoveries are made almost every day
*the book is written at a 6th grade level so some scientific detail had to be simplified
*the content of the book was reviewed by an oncologist, a biochemist, a GP, many stem cell doctors/scientists, a neuro-scientist and a many others

Background evidence:
“A Brief History of Stem Cell Treatment for Heart Disease” – http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/03/16/stem-cell-treatment-for-heart-disease/
“Do Stem Cell Treatments Work?” – http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/do-stem-cell-treatments-work/

Patient Case Study – James Eilert.  James was treated in 2006 and I include him because he is one of the best documented cases.  There were many others in 2004, 2005, 2006 but they don’t have as much data or press on them: http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/02/02/heart-muscle-health-aspects-vescell-adult-stem-cell-therapy/ http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/adult-stem-cells-fix-the-heart-part-1/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/adult-stem-cells-fix-the-heart-part-2/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/adult-stem-cells-fix-the-heart-part-3/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/adult-stem-cells-fix-the-heart-part-4/

If you need more information, I can put you in touch with James.

There are also ~318 other clinical trials dealing with adult stem cell treatment of heart disease – clinicaltrials.gov

There are a number of heart treatment centers currently treating patients – email me at dsgrano@gmail.com if you would like more information Read the rest of this entry »

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