DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘CURE’

Vitamin C boosts the reprogramming of adult cells into stem cells « Health Research Report

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 24, 2014 at 8:05 am

November 8, 2012

Vitamin C boosts the reprogramming of adult cells into stem cells 1

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/var/plain_site/storage/images/publications/food-beverage-nutrition/nutraingredients-usa.com/research/vitamin-c-rda-should-be-doubled-says-linus-pauling-institute-researcher/6914603-1-eng-GB/Vitamin-C-RDA-should-be-doubled-says-Linus-Pauling-Institute-researcher_strict_xxl.jpg

Famous for its antioxidant properties and role in tissue repair, vitamin C is touted as beneficial for illnesses ranging from the common cold to cancer and perhaps even for slowing the aging process. Now, a study published online on December 24th by Cell Press in the journal Cell Stem Cell uncovers an unexpected new role for this natural compound: facilitating the generation of embryonic-like stem cells from adult cells.

Over the past few years, we have learned that adult cells can be reprogrammed into cells with characteristics similar to embryonic stem cells by turning on a select set of genes. Although the reprogrammed cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have tremendous potential for regenerative medicine, the conversion is extremely inefficient.

“The low efficiency of the reprogramming process has hampered progress with this technology and is indicative of how little we understand it. Further, this process is most challenging in human cells, raising a significant barrier for producing iPSCs and serious concerns about the quality of the cells that are generated,” explains senior study author Dr. Duanqing Pei from the South China Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Pei and colleagues measured the production of reactive oxygen species or ROS during reprogramming and discovered a potential link between high ROS and low reprogramming efficiency. They became particularly interested in antioxidants, hypothesizing that they might suppress ROS and cell senescence, which seems to be a major roadblock for the generation of iPSCs.

The researchers found that adding vitamin C, an essential nutrient that is abundant in citrus fruits, enhanced iPSC generation from both mouse and human cells. Vitamin C accelerated gene expression changes and promoted a more efficient transition to the fully reprogrammed state. Somewhat to their surprise, they found that other antioxidants do not have the same effect, but vitamin C does seem to act at least in part through slowing cell senescence.

“Our results highlight a simple way to improve iPSC generation and provide additional insight into the mechanistic basis of reprogramming,” concludes Dr. Pei. “It is also of interest that a vitamin with long-suspected anti-aging effects has such a potent influence on reprogramming, which can be considered a reversal of the aging process at the cellular level. It is likely that our work may stimulate further research in this area as well.”

via Vitamin C boosts the reprogramming of adult cells into stem cells « Health Research Report.

Stem cell scarring aids recovery from spinal cord injury

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on November 5, 2013 at 2:45 pm

Scarring created by stem cells at the site of spinal cord injury actually assists in healing, instead of impeding it as previously thought! -dg

Stem Cell Scarring Aids Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury

Oct. 31, 2013 — In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that the scar tissue formed by stem cells after a spinal cord injury does not impair recovery; in fact, stem cell scarring confines the damage. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal Science, indicate that scar tissue prevents the lesion from expanding and helps injured nerve cells survive…

Stem cell scarring aids recovery from spinal cord injury.

AUTISM SPECTRUM, TREATMENTS AND CURES(?)

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on April 30, 2013 at 10:13 am

autism-not-a-disease

What is the Autism Spectrum? What does it mean to Treat? Does treat mean Cure?

Let’s be clear, as clear as we can. Nothing applies to all but we speak of an autistic spectrum, a gross lumping together of many different variations.

“A spectrum (plural spectra or spectrums[1]) is a condition that is not limited to a specific set of values but can vary infinitely within a continuum…the autism spectrum. In these uses, values within a spectrum may not be associated with precisely quantifiable numbers or definitions. Such uses imply a broad range of conditions or behaviors grouped together and studied under a single title for ease of discussion.”

We use spectrum because it’s easier to do so and because we don’t have 100 different, perfectly defined types of Autism in the spectrum. We don’t have: “Jimmy Jones presents with ADS#72″ and even if we did, it would probably look more like, “Jimmy Jones presents with ADS72 with non-specific characteristics of ADS34 and a dash of ADS9.” We are limited in that we have a spectrum, an umbrella of sorts with perhaps more dissimilarities than similarities between those on it but it’s the umbrella we have so let’s use it because it allows us to move forward on the discourse.

As for the term treat   and what I “mean” by it, now we are getting into strictly defined   terms.  Treat means:
1. To give medical aid to someone.
2. To give medical aid to counteract a disease or   condition.

Treat does not mean cure. .  Likewise, recovery does not mean remission. Asymptomatic does not mean therapeutic benefit.  A treatment, when applied to different people with the same condition or different people on a spectrum, may result in dissimilar responses or results. Some may recover, some may become asymptomatic, some may derive significant therapeutic benefit, some may derive lesser benefits and some may have no significant response to a treatment and some may have limited quantifiable change yet huge quality of life improvement.  I wish there were guarantees on treatments but there are not.

In addition, there are many different kinds of treatments stemming from different schools of thought on cause, affect, symptom alleviation, etc.  There is HBOC, MSC, Chelation Therapy, Nutritional Intervention, Gut Bacteria Proliferation, etc. and many studies showing their safety and efficacy and many swear by them.  Some of these treatments or therapies or interventions have worked for some on the spectrum and because it’s a spectrum, may not work on others. But we educate ourselves to what’s available and the new studies and advancements.

So, here are a few articles. Some will be relevant to your inquiries, some will not. I hope they are helpful and enlightening.  And this is not the sum total of the information out there, just a broad brush stroke collection.   I’ll keep looking and I’ll try to gather some more over the next few days to create a more comprehensive… spectrum…of data and information:  AUTISM AND STEM CELL TREATMENTS

———————————————————————-

I’ll leave you with this one last thought.  I used the image at the top for a reason.  It is something I’ve been wrestling with quite a lot lately.  Is Autism an identity or a disability?  Should we search for a cure or try to understand it.  I wrote an article on the subject early this month - AUTISM: IDENTITY OR DISABILITY  

And a chicken and the egg scenario just occurred to me.  Simply put:

Stem cells are the body’s natural healing system.  If you implant stem cells into the body, it will begin to repair itself.  It is the job of the stem cell to assist your body in functioning as well as it possibly can.  Dead tissue can begin to regenerate, new tissue can begin to develop, genetic anomalies can begin to correct, etc.  The stem cells and the body “know” what needs to be done or even, what needs to be fixed.  We can force them to do ‘x’ but eventually they will go fix ‘y.’

So if stem cells ‘fix’ something, that means (at the very least) that the stem cells and your body believed it needed ‘fixing.’  So in the simplest of terms and the broadest of definitions, if stem cells fix Autism, was it not because it needed to be fixed?  I don’t know.  I’m asking.  Maybe you have a different view.  If you do, I’d love to hear it.

p.s. A “friend” noted that cure is perhaps not the best term to use and I agree.  We do need a new set of words. Both for that reason and because we need to start seeing people as people and not as patients and definitely not as diseases. 

Further, when I eat well it is not to cure, when I go to the gym it is not to cure, when I meditate or do yoga it is not to cure. All of these things are to maximize my life, my health, my soundness of body and mind, my time on this earth, not to cure. Part of the issue is that Western medicine treats illnesses not people…wait until someone is sick and then try to fix what’s wrong with them with zero ‘cures’ since Polio 1954.   A pretty backward way of thinking.  Eastern medicine prevents disease as a by product of the efforts taken to maximize one’s health, vitality and life. We could learn a lot from this attitude.

KIDNEY BREAKTHROUGH: COMPLETE LAB GROWN ORGAN WORKS IN RATS

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 19, 2013 at 4:00 pm
A brand new rat kidney being built on the scaffold of an old one <i>(Image: Ott Lab, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital)</i>

A brand new rat kidney being built on the scaffold of an old one

(Image: Ott Lab, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital)

Kidney breakthrough: complete lab-grown organ works in rats

 

  • 18:00 14 April 2013 by Andy Coghlan

 

For the first time, complete lab-grown kidneys have been successfully transplanted into rats, filtering and discharging urine as a normal kidney would.

 

The breakthrough paves the way for human-scale versions, which could potentially provide an inexhaustible supply of organs, eliminating the need for recipients to wait for a matching donor kidney Movie Camera.

 

Similar techniques have already been applied successfully in people with simpler tissue, such as windpipes. But the kidney is by far the most complex organ successfully recreated.

 

“If this technology can be scaled to human-size grafts, patients suffering from renal failure, who are currently waiting for donor kidneys, could theoretically receive an organ grown on demand,” says Harald Ott, head of the team that developed the rat kidneys at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

 

“In an ideal world, such grafts could be produced from patient-derived cells, enabling us to overcome both donor organ shortages and the need for long-term immunosuppression drugs,” says Ott. Currently in the US alone, 18,000 transplants are carried out each year, but 100,000 Americans remain on waiting lists.

 

Strip and coat

 

To make the rat kidneys, Ott and his colleagues took kidneys from healthy “donor” rats and used a chemical solution to wash away the native cells, leaving behind the organ’s scaffold. Because this is made of collagen, a biologically inert material, there is no issue of the recipient’s body rejecting it.

 

Next, the team set about regrowing the “flesh” of the organ by coating the inner surfaces of the scaffold with new cells. In the case of humans, these would likely come from the recipient, so all the flesh would be their own.

 

The kidney was too complex to use the approach applied to the windpipe – in which its scaffold was coated by simply immersing it in a bath of the recipient’s cells.

 

Instead, the team placed the kidney scaffolds in glass chambers containing oxygen and nutrients, and attached tubes to the protruding ends of the renal artery, vein and ureter – through which urine normally exits the kidney. They recoated the insides of the blood vessels by flowing human stem cells through the tubes attached to the artery and vein. Through the ureter, they fed kidney cells from newborn rats, re-coating the labyrinthine tubules and ducts that make up the kidney’s urine filtration system.

 

It took many attempts to establish the precise pressures at which to feed the cells into the organ, as if it was growing in an embryonic rat. Remarkably, given the complexity of the kidney, the cells differentiated into exactly those required in the different compartments of the organ. “We found the correct cell types homed in to specific regions in the organ matrix,” says Ott.

 

The kidneys, which took about a fortnight to fully recoat, worked both in the lab and when transplanted into rats. They filtered out and discharged urine, although they did not sieve it as well as a natural kidney would. Ott is confident that the function can be improved by refining the technique.

 

Humans and pigs

 

The team is now attempting the same procedure using human kidneys, and also pig kidneys, which could be used to make scaffolds if there were a scarcity of human donors. The team has already successfully repopulated pig kidneys with human cells, but Ott says further studies are vital to guarantee that the pig components of the organ do not cause rejection when transplanted into humans.

 

The fact that heart valves and other “inert” tissues from pigs are already successfully used in humans without rejection suggests that this will not be a big problem.

 

Other researchers working in the field hailed the team’s success at recreating such a complex organ. “The researchers have taken a technique that most in the field thought would be impossible for complex organs such as the kidney, and have painstakingly developed a method to make it work,” says Jamie Davies at the University of Edinburgh, UK, who was part of a team that last year made some headway in their attempts to grow kidneys from scratch in the lab. “By showing that recellularisation is feasible even for complicated organs, their work will stimulate similar approaches to the engineering of other body systems.”

 

Journal reference: Nature Medicine, DOI: 10.1038/nm.3154

BLOOD, HEART AND BRAIN STEM CELLS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 11, 2013 at 10:40 am

stem cell science

Science daily is an excellent source for medical article and studies.  I’ve received their feed for quite a while now.  Here, are 3 stem cell articles from today.

  1. Blood stem cells, besides turning into hema type cells can also become white blood cells.
  2. Cardiac stem cells from bone marrow can heal the heart.  This we’ve known since the late 90′s but additional confirmation is always appreciated.
  3. Brain stem cells not only can turn into brain and nerve cells but they also clear out the garbage in the brain and keep the cells in a perpetual stem cell state.

These are 3 good stem cell articles but also of note…

This is the first time Science Daily has had three stem cell articles in their feed.  The world is turning to stem cells.  Are you?

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Surprising ability of blood stem cells to respond to emergencies

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131227.htm 

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 10:12 AM PDT

Scientists have revealed an unexpected role for hematopoietic stem cells: They do not merely ensure the continuous renewal of our blood cells; in emergencies they are capable of producing white blood cells “on demand” that help the body deal with inflammation or infection. This property could be used to protect against infections in patients undergoing bone marrow transplants, while their immune system reconstitutes itself.

 

Cardiopoietic ‘smart’ stem cells show promise in heart failure patients

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410103349.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 07:33 AM PDT

Therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or “smart” stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions.

 

Spring cleaning in your brain’s stem cells?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094120.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 06:41 AM PDT

Deep inside your brain, a legion of stem cells lies ready to turn into new brain and nerve cells when you need them. New research shows the vital role of a type of internal “spring cleaning” that both clears out garbage inside the cells, and keeps them in their perpetual stem-cell state.

STEM CELLS 101 – short

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on April 11, 2013 at 12:50 am

Transplanted adult dermal stem cells / Cellule...

STEM CELLS 101 – short

ADULT STEM CELL = ASC

  • SOURCE/DERIVED FROM•comes from
    blood, umbilical cords, bone marrow, placenta fat tissue, muscle, nasal
    neurological, breast milk, menstruation, dental pulp, lungs (new source!) and many more
  • PURPOSE IN BODY•they are the body’s natural healing cells
  • OBSTACLES+SIDE EFFECTS•~zero problems (virtually zero side effects)
  • TREATMENT HISTORY•used in bone marrow transplants to treat cancer for 40 years
  • TREATMENT HISTORY•can currently treat 130+ diseases safely and effectively (CP, MS, Autism, Diabetes, CHF, PAD, etc)

EMBRYONIC STEM CELL = ESC

  • SOURCE/DERIVED FROM•comes from embryos
  • PURPOSE IN BODY•split for 7 weeks until you have a fetus the size of a thumbnail
  • OBSTACLES+SIDE EFFECTS•they create
    cysts and tumors, rejection requires immunosuppressive drugs for the ill
    patient, they carry the genetic anomalies of the donor, etc
  • TREATMENT HISTORY•can currently treat zero diseases, probably need to cure cancer first to use them

INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELL = iPSC (“Embryonic Stem Cell Lite”)

  • SOURCE/DERIVED FROM•comes from regular adult cells like skin cells that are then transformed by scientists into stem cells
  • PURPOSE IN BODY•to be a skin cell or other tissue
  • OBSTACLES+SIDE EFFECTS•they create
    cysts and tumors, rejection requires immunosuppressive drugs for the ill
    patient, they carry the genetic anomalies of the donor…
  • TREATMENT HISTORY•no treatments to date, probably need to cure cancer first to use them

WHAT PRICE HEALTH?

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 2, 2013 at 4:02 pm

http://www.defendingfoodsafety.com/uploads/image/FDA%20-%20Grant%20Money.jpg

Greg said:

“Dave, word on the grapevine is a few stem cell professionals almost or did come to blows over the FDA nonsense. They couldn’t understand how the FDA has been stonewalling them when the FDA has okayed dangerous drugs with far less data and safety.”

I responded:

“This has been going on for some time. Simply put, there are a number of docs and treatment centers that are leading the charge, a full frontal assault on the FDA to obtain the right (which should not be something they need to petition for) to use autologous (from the patient’s own body) adult stem cells for treatment. There are a number of regulations that need to be met and federal, state and local law before one can treat in the USA. Almost nobody knows how to do this. Even those that do, can still come under fire and spend their entire war chest battling in the courts. Even if you win over and over, you still can waste valuable time, money and energy better spent treating patients and researching protocols and developing ideas.

There are also many patient groups who are actively lobbying for these rights and numerous petitions floating around. The call to arms I recently wrote which I am putting the finishing touches on, entitled “The Public Wants Stem Cell Treatments” addresses these issues directly. These are the front lines my friends and the docs and patients are on one side and the FDA and upstart regulatory bureaus trying to get a market share of stem cell regulation are on the other. Welcome to the wild west. The mortars and shrapnel are flying and anyone who sticks their head out of the fox hole will incur a mortal wound.

The number of hoops required to jump through are daunting and almost nobody knows how and fewer are willing to take the chance but the potential upside is thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of chronic and terminally ill patients with incurable disease recovering, going into remission, reclaiming their health and their lives.

What’s the value of that? What price can we put on our health? I’m reminded of the old credit card commercials…

Chronic disease = $30-150,000 per year
Loss of income from inability to work = $30-150,000 per year
Adult stem cell treatment = $8 – 10,000
Living without symptoms after treatment = Priceless
Living to see your daughter married = Priceless
Living to see your grandchild born = Priceless
Living without pain = Pricelesshttp://www.statusant.com/large/Today-be-thankful-and-think-how-rich-you-are.-Your-family-is-priceless%7C2C-your-time-is-gold-and-your-health-is-wealth.-status.jpgRelated articles

SNOWMEN RECEIVE STEM CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on March 3, 2013 at 2:36 pm

SNOWMEN RECEIVE STEM CELLS

BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE FOR ELDERLY STEM CELL PATIENTS

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 21, 2013 at 9:35 pm
Stem Cell Transplantation Safe For Elderly Patients

learnjiujitsu11513

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill., Feb. 19, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Researchers have shown that stem cell transplantation for elderly patients with blood cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), is safe and effective, according to research presented last week in Salt Lake City at the 2013 BMT Tandem Meetings, the combined annual meetings of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) and the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research.

Prior to this study, little was known about the safety of stem cell transplants in patients over the age of 70, who may have previously been excluded as candidates for stem cell transplantation because of their age.

This news about stem cell transplants comes as Robin Roberts returns as a host of Good Morning America tomorrow, five months after her successful transplant for MDS, a pre-leukemia blood disease that affects healthy blood cell formation in the bone marrow.  Although Roberts is younger, more than 80% of newly diagnosed MDS cases occur in people over the age of 60.

According to the research presented at the BMT Tandem Meetings, 56 patients age 70 or older, most of whom received transplants for acute leukemia or MDS, were identified for the study.  After being treated with low doses of chemotherapy and radiation, the majority of the patients received a peripheral blood stem cell transplant from a matched unrelated donor, while the remainder of the group received a transplant from a matched related donor.

surfing granny

Among the findings in 46 patients who experienced nadir (when blood cell counts are at their lowest):

  • the median time for blood cell counts to return to normal was 13 days;
  • one year after transplant, the incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease, a common transplant complication, was 37%;
  • the incidence of survival without disease progression one year after transplant was 42%;
  • the incidence of overall survival one year after transplant was 55%;
  • the cumulative incidence of relapse was 34%;
  • at day 100, a critical time for stem cell transplants, the incidence of non-relapse mortality was only 3.6%; and
  • the incidence of non-relapse mortality one year after transplant was only 5.5%.

“Particularly newsworthy in this year in which we celebrated the performance of the 1 millionth transplant worldwide were the presentations related to increasing the use of stem cell transplantation in older patients with acute leukemia and MDS,” said Sergio Giralt , MD, president-elect of the ASBMT and the hematologist/oncologist who performed Roberts’ stem cell transplant.  “This abstract presented at the BMT Tandem Meetings demonstrates the feasibility and relatively good outcomes of patients over the age of 70 undergoing stem cell transplantation for a variety of blood cancers.”

The BMT Tandem Meetings abstract book is published as a supplement to the February issue of Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the ASBMT.  The study, led by Andrew Brunner , MD, was conducted by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, both located in Boston.

The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation is an international professional membership association of physicians, investigators and other healthcare professionals promoting blood and marrow transplantation and cellular therapy research, education, scholarly publication and clinical standards.

Contact:
Thomas L. Joseph , MPS, CAE
Executive Director, ASBMT
(847) 427-0224

SOURCE American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/stem-cell-transplantation-safe-for-elderly-patients-191850851.html

Elderly MDS Patients May Achieve Long-Term Survival From Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCO 2012)

Elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia may experience long-term survival after undergoing stem cell transplantation, according to a recent study conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

PIONEERING??? Heart Study

In ALL ARTICLES, CATCH UP!, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 20, 2013 at 9:27 am

This makes me crazy.  Thousands, maybe tens of thousands treated to date successfully with studies going back to 2002 and they call this brand new study pioneering?  Consider the triple blind study protocol used:

  • 1/3 RECEIVE NOTHING AT ALL
  • 1/3 RECEIVE A PLACEBO
  • 1/3 RECEIVE STEM CELLS

The odds are not in his favor to even get the treatment.  It’s time to catch up to the rest of the world. – DG

DeBary man takes part in pioneering stem cell study

Dr. David Henderson, left, talks to his patient Robert Anderson, 64, of DeBary recently at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach. Anderson is participating in a clinical research trial that uses a patient’s own stem cells to regenerate cardiovascular tissue. He was the first patient to enroll in the clinical study that started in December at Cardiology Research Associates of Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center.

News-Journal/STEVEN NOTARAS

By
STAFF WRITER
Published: Monday, February 18, 2013 at 5:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, February 17, 2013 at 5:41 p.m.

DAYTONA BEACH — At 44, Robert Anderson’s career as a chemical engineer was cut short due to pain in his chest and jaw.

A few years earlier doctors had performed bypass surgery on Anderson to repair the deteriorating muscle around his heart. Like 850,000 Americans, Anderson suffers from angina, which causes chest discomfort due to coronary heart disease.

But the surgery was a temporary fix for Anderson, whose diabetes worsened his heart condition. As the pain in his jaw and chest increased when he walked, the DeBary resident was forced into early retirement.

For the past 20 years, Anderson’s life has been limited by his heart condition, which has only worsened.

With no surgical options left, Anderson is hoping his participation in a clinical research trial that uses a patient’s own stem cells to regenerate cardiovascular tissue will improve his quality of life. Some patients taking part in the study also were injected with a placebo…

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