DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘chicago’

STEM CELLS FOR SCLERODERMA

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 25, 2013 at 9:05 am

One day, people will use stem cell treatments as the first course of action instead of the last and save themselves a lot of money, time and suffering.  We can only hope! – DG

“I need money for my stem cell transplant. That’s kind of my last option. I’ve tried everything else.” – Cat David

Cat Davis

Cat Davis receives stem cell transplant

Published On: Jan 24 2013 04:43:05 AM PST  Updated On: Jan 24 2013 04:40:32 PM PST

SPOKANE, Wash. -

It’s an incredible day of victory for a Spokane woman, who thought she may not live to see it. Cat Davis, whose story we’ve been following since last fall, has now received the stem-cell transplant that will likely save her life.

Four months ago, it looked like today would never come. Four months ago, Cat sat in her North Spokane living room and said, “I need money for my stem cell transplant. That’s kind of my last option. I’ve tried everything else.”

Scleroderma had taken so much away from the vibrant woman in her mid-20′s. Her skin and organs have been hardening for years, her esophagus was so narrowed, she couldn’t eat solid foods. Every day was a race against the clock. If the disease goes too far in her heart and lungs, there’s nothing they can do. Time and money were against her. So were the odds.

Spokane rallied. Through coffee and pizza and fun runs and ice cream, the community raised more than $170,000 to help pay for the transplant and other medical expenses. They were touched by her smile and positive attitude. Her story stretched around the world.

Thursday morning in a hospital room in Chicago, Cat got that stem-cell transplant, marking the first day of the rest of her life.

“Transplant is complete! Cat has 14.2 million brand new baby cells circulating in her blood stream It all went as planned.” Cat’s mom Sally emailed those words to Cat’s friends and family Thursday morning. The past few days have been hell for Cat, as chemotherapy killed off her immune system and made her terribly sick. Cat’s mom counted down the days leading to transplant day as “minus one” and “minus two” and so forth.

Thursday, a new day.

“A long battle lies ahead,” Sally wrote. “We will win the victory. This is Day 0. From now on we count the days as pluses. No more minuses.”

Now, the recovery. Cat will spend the next 10 days or so in Chicago, recovering. Then, it’s back to Spokane for a long road to full strength. Cat and her family feel the love and prayers all the way from Spokane. Cat’s family and friends decorated her room with purple hearts, made at Ben and Jerry’s in Spokane during a fundraising drive last year.

“We have saved them all this time for this day,” Sally Davis wrote. “They are precious. One of my favorite says, “Fight like a girl!”

She’s been fighting long enough. Now, it’s time for Cat to rest and get well. And, know that everyone in Spokane is behind her.

Her journey so far has touched so many lives. Now, it’s time to save her own.

Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 20, 2012 at 11:14 pm
Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

Posted: June  18, 2012 by Sherri McGinnis Gonzalez

Chicagoan Ieshea Thomas is the first Midwest patient to receive a successful stem cell transplant to cure her sickle cell disease without chemotherapy in preparation for the transplant. University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System physicians performed the procedure using medication to suppress her immune system and one small dose of total body radiation right before the transplant.The transplant technique is relatively uncommon and is a much more tolerable treatment for patients with aggressive sickle cell disease who often have underlying organ disease and other complications, says Dr. Damiano Rondelli, professor of medicine at UIC, who performed Thomas’s transplant.

The procedure initially allows a patient’s own bone marrow to coexist with that of the donor. Since the patient’s bone marrow is not completely destroyed by chemotherapy or radiation prior to transplant, part of the immune defense survives, lessening the risk of infection. The goal is for the transplanted stem cells to gradually take over the bone marrow’s role to produce red blood cells — normal, healthy ones…

No Wedding Day for Jay Cutler – Diabetes

In ALL ARTICLES on October 24, 2011 at 6:59 pm

No Wedding Day for Jay

by on July 26, 2011 in Entertainment, Sports

It appears Jay Cutler will not be walking down the aisle next spring. The Chicago Bears quarterback broke off his engagement to The Hills star, Kristin Cavallari just weeks before the start of football season. Cutler, now 28, was diagnosed with diabetes three years ago. He has Type 1, sometimes referred to as “juvenile diabetes,” which is a misnomer. While the onset typically occurs in children and adolescents, people of any age can be affected. Cutler himself was 25. He exhibited all the classic signs of diabetes: weight loss (he went from 238 pounds to 203 in a few short months), frequent urination, insatiable thirst, and lack of energy. As a result of untreated diabetes, his game suffered. It was not until a routine blood test (required to participate in offseason training), that Cutler learned he had diabetes.

Diabetes, generally speaking, is a condition in which the body’s cells do not receive adequate supply of sugar, in particular, a sugar called glucose. When our food is digested,  glucose makes its way into our bloodstream. Our cells use the glucose for energy and growth. But glucose cannot enter our cells without insulin. It is insulin which enables our cells to take in glucose. Without insulin, the sugar levels in the bloodstream rise.

Cutler’s adult-onset type 1 diabetes highlights the importance of distinguishing the three different types of diabetes:

Type 1 may more accurately be termed “insulin-dependent” diabetes. This is because people with the condition require daily, subcutaneous injections of insulin for the rest of their lives. In type 1, the body’s immune system attacks cells in the pancreas that make insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is sometimes referred to as “adult diabetes.” This is another misconception. In fact, recent studies conducted by the CDC have found that children and teenagers are being diagnosed with the disease at an alarming rate. About 95% of those children were obese at the time of diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin, suffers from “insulin resistance”, or both.  Insulin resistance means that the cells no longer respond properly to the insulin present.  An unhealthy weight is a major risk factor.

A third type, gestational diabetes, occurs in pregnant women, and is usually temporary. Complications can still endanger the health of the woman and her fetus.

There is also an uncommon medical condition called diabetes insipidus which actually has nothing to do with insulin. In diabetes insipidus, the kidneys are unable to conserve water as they filter blood. This problem arises either directly from the kidney, or from a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, which produces a hormone, called ADH, that controls water conservation.

Despite the differences between type 1 and 2, the complications are often the same. The higher the blood sugars over an extended period of time, the greater the risk for complications such as blindness, stroke, nerve damage,  limb amputation, kidney failure, and premature death.

Celebrities with Diabetes (type 1 or 2)

Type 1

Type 2

  • Halle Berry – actress
  • BB King – musician
  • Sugar Ray Leonard – boxer
  • Drew Carey – actor; comedian; game show host
  • Tommy Lee – drummer for Motley Crue
  • Billie Jean King – tennis player

Salma Hayek (gestational diabetes)

Stem cells “seek and destroy” cancer cells: Study

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on February 14, 2010 at 7:16 pm

Stem cells “seek and destroy” cancer cells: Study

BY JULIE STEENHUYSEN, REUTERS

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Genetically engineered stem cells from bone marrow showed promise as a potential new way to deliver a cancer-killing protein to tumors, British researchers said on Tuesday…

Experiments in cell cultures and in mice showed the adult stem cells -- a type known as mesenchymal stem cells -- could home in on cancer cells and deliver a lethal protein that attacked only the cancer while sparing normal healthy tissue.

Experiments in cell cultures and in mice showed the adult stem cells — a type known as mesenchymal stem cells — could home in on cancer cells and deliver a lethal protein that attacked only the cancer while sparing normal healthy tissue.

Photograph by: Darren Hauck, Getty Images

CATCH UP! – Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury

In CATCH UP! on October 29, 2009 at 3:28 am

The USA is so far behind the rest of the world it scares me.  The lungs are the greediest of all of the organs in the body for stem cells.  ALI, COPD, etc have been treated around the world with adult stem cells for a long time now.  There was even a clinical trial in Dresden on 86 human patients   -

“Acute Lung Injury After Allogeneic Transplantation – Diagnosis and Early Treatment”

Enrollment: 86
Study Start Date: December 2001
Primary Completion Date: August 2005 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

…and the US is just barely putting a toe in the water with mouse studies? It’s time to CATCH UP!

-DG

http://stopsmokingnow.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/lungs.gif

Lungs

Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury

ScienceDaily (Oct. 28, 2009) — Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can prevent acute lung injury in a mouse model of the disease.

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2005/august24/gifs/mice_smooth.jpg

Their results are reported online in the October issue of the journal Stem Cells.

Acute lung injury (ALI) is responsible for an estimated 74,500 deaths in the U.S. each year. ALI can be caused by any major inflammation or injury to the lungs and is a major cause of death in patients in hospital ICUs. There is no effective drug treatment…

Except for adult stem cell treatments outside the US which you can find here – TREATMENT INFO NOW

via Stem Cell Therapy May Offer Hope For Acute Lung Injury.

STEM CELL Transplants help Type 1 diabetics skip insulin | Health | Reuters

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on April 14, 2009 at 6:24 am

insulin-syringe-no-more

STEM CELL Transplants help Type 1 diabetics skip insulin

CHICAGO (Reuters) – People with type 1 diabetes who got stem cell transplants were able to go as long as four years without needing insulin treatments, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.

They said the process, which involves injecting people with stem cells made from their bone marrow cells, appears to have a lasting effect.

The study involved patients with Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, which occurs when the immune system goes haywire and starts attacking itself, destroying insulin-producing cells in the pancreas needed to control blood sugar.

These patients typically need daily insulin therapy to control their diabetes.

Dr. Richard Burt of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and colleagues first reported on the short-term success of the procedure, known as autologous non-myeloablative hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, in 2007 but have since looked at how long it persisted.

Writing in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association they said 20 of 23 patients “became insulin free — 12 continuously and eight transiently — for periods as long as four years.” The transient group of eight had to restart insulin at reduced levels.

The patients ranged in age from 13 to 31.

To find out if the change was lasting the research team said they measured levels of C-peptides, which show how well the body is producing insulin. They found those levels increased “up to 24 months after transplantation and were maintained until at least 36 months,” their report said.

Even in the group which had to restart insulin there was still a significant increase in C-peptide levels that lasted at least two years, the researchers said.

They said the procedure was able to induce “prolonged and significant increases of C-peptide levels” in the small group of patients who were taking little or no insulin.

“At the present time (it) remains the only treatment capable of reversing type 1 diabetes mellitus in humans,” the team wrote.

“Randomized controlled trials and further biological studies are necessary to confirm the role of this treatment in changing the natural history of (the disease),” they added.

(Editing by Julie Steenhuysen and Alan Elsner)

via Transplants help Type 1 diabetics skip insulin | Health | Reuters.

FDA Part 4 – Revamped FDA may spell end to healthy, chemical free, non-genetically modified food?

In ALL ARTICLES, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on March 26, 2009 at 12:58 am

genetically-modified-food-fda-obama

Obama actually just had to ban the use of ill “downer” livestock in food production.  Well that’s great and definitely a step in the right direction…can you believe that it’s 2009 and prior to his ban the gov’t and food industry thought it was ok to eat food made from diseased animals?!?!

And now there are going to be big changes within the FDA.  Rest assured, no other organization needs it more…i just hope this isn’t the death knell for safe, healthy, organic food and the government backed call to arms for genetically modified, chemically treated foods in “the interest of safety”.  My expectations are pretty low by now…”just last (month) the U.S. Food and Drug Administration praised genetically modified animals. And will NOT require meat from GM animals to be labeled for consumers. ” – http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives/hurtful-food-united-states-set-to-block-genetically-modified-food.html – dg

Groups urge FDA changes to boost U.S. food safety

http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSTRE52O55Z20090325

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) – The Obama administration should appoint a senior food safety official within the Food and Drug Administration as a first step toward safeguarding the U.S. food supply, two advocacy groups said on Wednesday.

The responsibility for food safety currently is divided up among federal agencies including the FDA and U.S. Department of Agriculture, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention monitoring disease outbreaks.

A report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation urged the appointment of a senior FDA official to take charge of food safety as an interim step toward fixing the much-criticized U.S. food safety system.

The groups said in the long run, the government needs a new agency within the Department of Health and Human Services whose sole task is regulating the food supply.

“Our food safety system is plagued with problems and is leading to millions of Americans becoming severely sick each year,” Jeff Levi, executive director of the Trust for America’s Health, told reporters during a conference call.

An outbreak of salmonella in peanut products has further shaken confidence in the safety of the U.S. food supply. It has sickened nearly 700 people, has been linked to nine deaths and has forced the largest food recall in U.S. history.

President Barack Obama on March 14 chose Dr. Margaret Hamburg to run the FDA and also announced a Cabinet-level group that will provide advice on how to improve food safety.

‘THE FIRST PRIORITY’

“I believe the first priority should be to repair what is wrong at FDA,” Michael Taylor of George Washington University, who has worked in food safety posts at both the FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, told reporters.

“The FDA has jurisdiction over 80 percent of the food supply, including virtually all imports. Recent nationwide outbreaks involving salmonella-tainted produce and peanuts expose really critical shortcomings at FDA and CDC with respect to both prevention and response to foodborne outbreaks,” added Taylor, who provided advice for the report.

Taylor said the FDA has three critical weaknesses:

* obsolete statutes that focus on reacting to problems instead of preventing them;

* inadequate resources that have resulted in “serious gaps in standard-setting and a weak enforcement program”;

* and a fragmented structure that impedes management.

While ultimately the FDA commissioner has the power to guide food safety, he said the focus at FDA traditionally has been on medications. “There is no FDA official whose full-time job is food safety,” Taylor said.  Continued…


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