DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘CELLS’

EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS CREATED BY 3D PRINTER

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 8, 2013 at 9:00 am

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3D-Printed Human Embryonic Stem Cells Created for First Time

Imagine if you could take living cells, load them into a printer, and squirt out a 3D tissue that could develop into a kidney or a heart. Scientists are one step closer to that reality, now that they have developed the first printer for embryonic human stem cells.

In a new study, researchers from the University of Edinburgh have created a cell printer that spits out living embryonic stem cells. The printer was capable of printing uniform-size droplets of cells gently enough to keep the cells alive and maintain their ability to develop into different cell types. The new printing method could be used to make 3D human tissues for testing new drugs, grow organs, or ultimately print cells directly inside the body.  Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are obtained from human embryos and can develop into any cell type in an adult person, from brain tissue to muscle to bone. This attribute makes them ideal for use in regenerative medicine — repairing, replacing and regenerating damaged cells, tissues or organs. [Stem Cells: 5 Fascinating Findings]

In a lab dish, hESCs can be placed in a solution that contains the biological cues that tell the cells to develop into specific tissue types, a process called differentiation. The process starts with the cells forming what are called “embryoid bodies.” Cell printers offer a means of producing embryoid bodies of a defined size and shape.

In the new study, the cell printer was made from a modified CNC machine (a computer-controlled machining tool) outfitted with two “bio-ink” dispensers: one containing stem cells in a nutrient-rich soup called cell medium and another containing just the medium. These embryonic stem cells were dispensed through computer-operated valves, while a microscope mounted to the printer provided a close-up view of what was being printed.  The two inks were dispensed in layers, one on top of the other to create cell droplets of varying concentration. The smallest droplets were only two nanoliters, containing roughly five cells.

The cells were printed onto a dish containing many small wells. The dish was then flipped over so the droplets now hung from them, allowing the stem cells to form clumps inside each well. (The printer lays down the cells in precisely sized droplets and in a certain pattern that is optimal for differentiation.)  Tests revealed that more than 95 percent of the cells were still alive 24 hours after being printed, suggesting they had not been killed by the printing process. More than 89 percent of the cells were still alive three days later, and also tested positive for a marker of their pluripotency — their potential to develop into different cell types.

Biomedical engineer Utkan Demirci, of Harvard University Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, has done pioneering work in printing cells, and thinks the new study is taking it in an exciting direction. “This technology could be really good for high-throughput drug testing,” Demirci told LiveScience. One can build mini-tissues from the bottom up, using a repeatable, reliable method, he said. Building whole organs is the long-term goal, Demirci said, though he cautioned that it “may be quite far from where we are today.”

Others have created printers for other types of cells. Demirci and colleagues made one that printed embryonic stem cells from mice. Others have printed a kind of human stem cells from connective tissues, which aren’t able to develop into as many cell types as embryonic stem cells. The current study is the first to print embryonic stem cells from humans, researchers report in the Feb. 5 issue of the journal Biofabrication.

http://news.yahoo.com

A TREATMENT FOR ALS? Neural stem cell transplants slow progression of disease

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 3, 2013 at 2:33 pm
A treatment for ALS?
Neural stem cell transplants slow progression of disease

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“The transplanted neural stem cells help by producing factors that preserve the health and function of the host’s remaining nerve cells. They also reduce inflammation and suppress the number of disease-causing cells in the host’s spinal cord. The neural stem cells did not replace deteriorating nerve cells in the mice with ALS.  Researchers observed improved motor performance and respiratory function in the treated mice. The neural stem cell transplant also slowed the disease’s progression.

Twenty-five percent of the treated ALS mice in the study survived for one year or more — roughly three to four times longer than the untreated mice.”

Results from a meta-analysis of 11 independent amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) research studies are giving hope to the ALS community by showing, for the first time, that the fatal disease may be treatable.

Researchers say progress in treating ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, may be made by targeting new mechanisms revealed by neural stem cell-based studies.

“This significant research will help us better understand the mechanisms underlying motor neuron diseases,” said Yang (Ted) Teng, Harvard Medical School associate professor of surgery at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and one of the study’s co-lead authors. Teng is also director of the Spinal Cord Injury and Stem Cell Biology Research Laboratory in the Department of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s.

The research studies were conducted at Brigham and Women’s; the Harvard affiliates Children’s Hospital Boston and Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System; Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute; University of Massachusetts Medical School; Johns Hopkins University; State University of New York Upstate Medical University; and Columbia University.

“This is not a cure for ALS. But it shows the potential that mechanisms used by neural stem cells in our study have for improving an ALS patient’s quality of life and length of life,” said Yang (Ted) Teng, one of the principal investigators of Project ALS’ consortium project. File photo by Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer

ALS causes nerve cells in the spinal cord to die, eventually taking away a person’s ability to move or even breathe. A decade of research conducted at multiple institutions showed, however, that when neural stem cells were transplanted into multilevels of the spinal cord of a mouse model with familial ALS, disease onset and progression slowed, motor and breathing function improved, and treated mice survived three to four times longer than untreated mice.

A summary of the findings from all 11 studies was published online in December in Science Translational Medicine.

“This work sheds new light on detrimental roles played by non-neuronal cells in triggering motor neuron death, and these events should be targeted for developing more effective therapeutics to treat ALS,” Teng said.

The transplanted neural stem cells help by producing factors that preserve the health and function of the host’s remaining nerve cells. They also reduce inflammation and suppress the number of disease-causing cells in the host’s spinal cord. The neural stem cells did not replace deteriorating nerve cells in the mice with ALS.

Researchers observed improved motor performance and respiratory function in the treated mice. The neural stem cell transplant also slowed the disease’s progression. Twenty-five percent of the treated ALS mice in the study survived for one year or more — roughly three to four times longer than the untreated mice.

“This is not a cure for ALS,” said Teng, who is one of the principal investigators of Project ALS’ consortium project. “But it shows the potential that mechanisms used by neural stem cells in our study have for improving an ALS patient’s quality of life and length of life.”

To read the full story, visit the Harvard Medical School website.

ADULT STEM CELL POTENTIAL IN REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 14, 2012 at 7:57 pm

Adipose tissue embolus  Case 104

 

By expanding the use of adipose tissue and its stem cell components, scientist and surgeons have made significant strides in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. “The opportunities for regenerative medicine interventions based on adult stem cells are tremendous…” – Ivona Percec, MD, PhD

 

As researchers work on reconfiguring cells to take on new regenerative properties, a new review from Penn Medicine plastic surgeons sheds additional light on the potential power of adipose-derived stem cells – or adult stem cells harvested from fatty tissue – in reconstructive and regenerative medicine.

Fat-derived stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine November 9, 2012 in Surgery (Medical Xpress)—As researchers work on reconfiguring cells to take on new regenerative properties, a new review from Penn Medicine plastic surgeons sheds additional light on the potential power of adipose-derived stem cells – or adult stem cells harvested from fatty tissue – in reconstructive and regenerative medicine.

 

Reconstructive plastic surgeons have clinically integrated “fat grafting” into different surgeries for years, for breast, facial, and other reconstructive and restorative surgeries, with good success. Now, researchers are beginning to understand the power that fatty tissue holds. This new paper, published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal, enforces that adipose-derived stem cells can be routinely isolated from patients, and once molecular methods are worked out, may be useful for a multitude of regenerative medicine applications. “The opportunities for regenerative medicine interventions based on adult stem cells are tremendous. It is critically important for us to better understand the biology of these cells so that we can develop novel, safe and effective treatments for our patients using their own cells.” said the paper’s senior author, Ivona Percec, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the division of Plastic Surgery in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Many groups are looking into different modes of isolating and modifying these cells for their regenerative properties, including experts at Penn’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine and around Penn Medicine. For example, Dr. Percec’s team is conducting translational research into the mechanisms controlling adipose-derived stem cells, and how they contribute to the normal human aging process. Stem cells can undergo multiple divisions without differentiation, making them useful tools for cell-replacement therapy. Embryonic stem cells can convert to any cell type, whereas adult stem cells, like the stem cells derived from fat, can differentiate into many, but not all, cell types. A person’s own fat tissue could then potentially be converted into cells specially designed to repair damage to the heart, cartilage, blood vessels, brain, muscle, or bone. As regenerative medicine techniques are refined, experts will continue to explore the utility and benefits of stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

 

Fat Grafting’s Past, Present and Future:  Why Adipose Tissue Is Emerging as a Critical Link to the Advancement of Regenerative Medicine  –  Ivona Percec, MD, PhD

medicalexpress.com

OPRAH, MICHAEL J FOX, DR OZ – STEM CELL DEBATE IS DEAD!

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on October 22, 2011 at 9:15 am

The debate ended 2.5 years ago but the battle still wages on! SO much has changed in 2.5 years  yet so much remains the same. 

The world has embraced the knowledge that adult stem cells can treat almost anything with safety and success but nobody in the USA knows about it because they are not available here and considered “unapproved by the FDA.”

Maybe we can enlist the “Occupy Wall Street” peeps to make some huge needed changes in our health care and available treatments.  – David

Originally from: http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/03/31/oprah-michael-j-fox-dr-mehmet-oz-the-stem-cell-debate-is-over/

The Stem Cell Debate Is Over! ...sort of...

The Wisdom of Oz

Visualize the surreal image of Oprah Winfrey, Michael J Fox and Dr. Mehmet Oz, wearing purple surgical gloves, sitting on stage around a human brain. Dr. Oz explains the absence of Nigro-Striatal Neurons in the brain of Parkinson’s patients while lifting out partially dissected chunks of brain and placing them into Michael’s shaking hand.

The camera zooms in as Dr. Oz steadies Michael’s hand in his. Dr. Oz weaves an intimidating, steel needle between Michael’s gloved and trembling fingers and illustrates the procedure for injecting stem cells into the brain by plunging it both into and through the quivering cerebellum. Michael’s legs spasm and contort and my stomach clenches empathetically with what I sense is Michael’s extreme discomfort, but is really a symptom of his condition.

And yet, NOTHING could have prepared me for what happened next as Dr. Oz, unbelievably and without prelude or warning, makes the stunning statement:
“I think, Oprah, the stem cell debate is dead.”

“The problem with embryonic stem cells is that embryonic stem cells come from embryos, like all of us are made from embryos, and those cells can become any cell in the body, but it’s very hard to control them and so they can become cancer.”

While astonished by his public announcement, I soon began to wonder: “why did Dr Oz only briefly allude to the potential of iPS cells and the proven benefits of adult stem cell treatments?” And then it became clear.

Dr Oz recognizes that the average person on an American street is led to believe, “a stem cell is an embryo is a stem cell”. Due to years of misleading media saturation, as far most Americans know, there are no other stem cells besides embryonic. Walk down the street and ask someone “what is an adult stem cell…what is an iPS cell”, and your inquiries will surely be met by blank stares.

So in retrospect, what Oz DID do, was truly…amazing.

Shunning the history of the love/hate affair Americans have with Embryonic stem cell research and ignoring the majority of US media over the past 5 years, the decrees of President Obama’s funding policies, the positions of the FDA and AMA and the fruitless decade long public pursuit of embryonic cures undertaken by Michael J Fox (with the benevolent and optimistic spirit of Christopher Reeve hovering over him) and before the bewildered eyes of Michael, Oprah and ~7.2 million viewers, Dr Mehmet Oz nailed the coffin shut on ESC treatments:
“I think, Oprah, the stem cell debate is dead.”

With this one simple statement on national TV, Dr Oz has taken the first step towards educating the American public about the current insurmountable limitations of embryonic stem cells and cracked open the door to the American collective mind-set regarding the potential of iPS cells and the reality that Repair stem cells (RSC) have been treating diseases around the world successfully for a decade. Despite the fact that thousands of American doctors refer to RSC as “snake oil,” more and more American patients are realizing that the US medical system is faltering, dated and just not working while the greatest medicine the world has ever seen is available just beyond the borders of their own country.

The seeds planted by Dr Oz will take a long time to find purchase in the collective American mind-set. There is too much embryonic momentum, media and drama, and America loves drama. Embryonic stem cells will not go away and like Romeo and Juliet, this love/hate affair may have to run its course for most, despite Dr Oz stealing the “distilled liquor” and Romeo’s poison and dagger in an attempt to avoid all of the deaths at the end of this play.

To read more about this grim fairy tale: http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/03/30/a-grim-fairy-tale-americas-doomed-love-affair-with-embryonic-stem-cell-research-intro-the-romance-is-an-illusion/

One step at a time we will climb this mountain and slowly open American eyes to improve their knowledge of treatment options so all can intelligently exercise the freedom of choice in their individual medical care. One inch at a time, Oz wisely created a pathway to an amazing new world of available medical treatments for what were previously believed to be incurable diseases and are in fact treating patients successfully around the world.

Dr Oz took this first step and it was a HUGE first step!

So from where I am sitting, I would like to express my heartfelt and sincerest appreciation for Dr Oz’s bravery, statements and actions. Thank you, Dr. Oz and thank you Oprah; for allowing this sage doctor the forum to break the walls restricting millions of Americans from the knowledge of the medical treatment options they so unquestionably deserve.

Here is the actual transcript based on my ears and fingers and a lot of patient rewinding:

“I think, Oprah, the stem cell debate is dead.”

“The problem with embryonic stem cells is that embryonic stem cells come from embryos, like all of us are made from embryos, and those cells can become any cell in the body, but it’s very hard to control them and so they can become cancer.”

“I can take a little bit of your skin, take those cells, get them to go back in time so they are like they were when you were first made, and then they will start to make that dopamine & I think those cells, because they won’t be as prone to cancer & because they’re your genes will be the ones that are ultimately used to cure Parkinsons.”

“I think we are single digit years away from making a big impact in the lives of Parkinson’s disease but also diabetics, heart disease, people who have had a lot of problems.”

To see the original video: http://www.oprah.com/media/20090319-tows-dr-oz-brain

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

In ALL ARTICLES on February 18, 2011 at 10:13 am

“Transplanting autologous renal progenitor cells (RPCs), (kidney stem cells derived from self-donors), into rat models with kidney damage from pyelonephritis – a type of urinary infection that has reached the kidney – has been found to improve kidney structure and function.”

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/classes/304/kidney.gif

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 14, 2011) – Transplanting autologous renal progenitor cells (RPCs), (kidney stem cells derived from self-donors), into rat models with kidney damage from pyelonephritis – a type of urinary infection that has reached the kidney – has been found to improve kidney structure and function.

The study, authored by a research team from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, is published in the current issue of Cell Medicine [1(3)] and is freely available on-line at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/cm .

“Advancements in stem cell therapies and tissue engineering hold great promise for regenerative nephrology,” said Dr. Abdol-Mohammad Kajbafzadeh, corresponding author. “Our RPC transplant study demonstrated benefits for pyelonephritis, a disease characterized by severe inflammation, renal function impairment and eventual scarring, and which remains a major cause of end-stage-renal disease worldwide.”

The researchers divided 27 rats into three groups, two of which were modeled with an induced pyelonephritis in their right kidneys, while the third group did not have induced disease. RPCs were obtained from the diseased animals’ left kidneys and injected into the right kidney six weeks later. Two weeks after injection, tubular atrophy was reduced. After four weeks, fibrosis was reduced and after sixty days, right renal tissue integrity was “significantly improved.”

“We propose that kidney augmentation was mainly due to functional tissue regeneration following cellular transplantation,” said Dr. Kajbafzadeh. “Kidney-specific stem/progenitor cells might be the most appropriate candidates for transplantation because of their inherent organ-specific differentiation and their capacity to modulate tissue remodeling in chronic nephropathies.”

The researchers concluded that because renal fibrosis is a common and ultimate pathway leading to end-stage renal disease, amelioration of fibrosis might be of major clinical relevance.

“Transplanting RPCs showed the potential for partial augmentation of kidney structure and function in pyelonephritis,” said Dr. Kajbafzadeh. “This is one of the first studies to demonstrate improved renal function after cell transplantation. The translation of this study into larger clinical models will be very relevant to validate the success of this small animal study.” said Dr. Amit Patel, Section Editor Cell Medicine, Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Utah.

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Citation. Kajbafzadeh, A-M.; Elmi, A.; Talab, S. S.; Sadeghi, Z.; Emami, H.; Sotoudeh, M. Autografting of Renal Progenitor Cells Ameliorates Kidney Damage in Experimental Model of Pyelonephritis. Cell Med. 1(3): 115-122; 2010.

Stem cell transplants help kidney damage

Palos Hills Veterinarian Tries New Treatment For Her Dog

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 17, 2011 at 8:09 pm

A Palos Hills vet leaned on a colleague for an innovative treatment for her own dog.

By Cristel Mohrman

Credit Cristel Mohrman
As a veterinarian, Leslie Dahl knows the obstacles that aging pets can face. And as a pet owner, she has watched her own dog battle the stairs with arthritic hips.  But if all goes as planned, her dog will soon be walking pain-free. Doodle, a German shepherd, became a guinea pig, so to speak, as the first animal in Illinois to undergo a one-day, in-clinic stem cell procedure.

Dr. Mitch Robbins conducted the procedure on Friday at Buffalo Grove’s Veterinary Specialty Center, where he removed fat tissue from Doodle’s abdominal area and used the center’s newest technology to inject the dog’s hip joints with her own stem cells.

“The reason that it works is that those cells that we’re removing and processing and stimulating are cells that are normally associated with the healing process and the inflammatory process in the body,” Robbins said. “So they go into the joint, they reduce some of the inflammation in the joint, they improve and reduce pain, they improve range of motion, they improve use of the joint.”

While the Buffalo Grove clinic has performed about 40 such regenerative therapy procedures over the past four years, until now the extracted materials were shipped off-site for preparation, resulting in a more drawn out and expensive process.

Last week, Veterinary Specialty Center adopted new technology from Kentucky-based MediVet-America, which allows medical professionals to complete the entire process in-house over the course of just a few hours.

Katherine Wilkie, MediVet-America’s lab services director, guided Buffalo Grove’s team through the process, which involves using machinery to separate stem cells from the rest of the animal’s tissue and cleaning it so that it can be re-injected.

While professionals received instruction, Doodle, still groggy from the tissue extraction, waited in a nearby cage. By the end of the day, she was picked up by Dahl, who brought her back to their Oak Park home.

Over the next few weeks, she is expected to regain her mobility, which has been hindered by bilateral hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis.

“With the stem cells, we’re hoping that they buy her some quality relief and improve her quality of life,” said Dahl, who is a veterinarian at Southwest Animal Care Center in Palos Hills. “I want her to be able to play and the next day not have any of the post-exercise inflammation that she’s having now.”

Robbins emphasized that stem cell treatment will not cure arthritis,but in most cases the procedure eases his four-legged patients’ discomfort. He said the treatment has benefited about 75 percent of his patients, and two-thirds have no longer needed pain medication.

That is especially important to pet owners like Dahl, whose German shepherd’s sensitive stomach won’t tolerate more traditional treatments. Last spring, she brought Doodle to Veterinary Specialty Center for collagen gel injections that noticeably improved the dog’s condition. When Doodle’s discomfort returned in recent months and Dahl learned that the treatment was no longer available, she jumped at the chance to test out the stem cell process.

“We’re going to do what we can to make sure she’s with us as long as possible,” Dahl said.

Robbins said stem cell therapy is generally effective for about 18 months. Extra cells are collected during the initial extraction and stored for subsequent injections, he said.

“They are never going to cure the arthritis, but they should do a very good job of controlling the pain that Doodle has, allowing her to resume a better, more normal quality of life,” he said.

MediVet-America’s technology was introduced in the U.S. May 2010, and it is now being used in 23 states, Wilkie said, with one or two procedures taking place in the U.S. each day.

Doctors report success rates ranging from 75 percent to 90 percent, Wilkie said.

The procedure costs about $1,800; nearly $1,000 less than the expense of a multiple-day procedure, which involves the costs of sending the tissue to outside labs.

Robbins said he expects to use the new technology to benefit 20 to 50 dogs and cats per year.

Top of Form

Will Rover outlive Grandma?
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/03/01/will-rover-outlive-grandma/

MORE BAD NEWS ABOUT AVAILABLE US TREATMENTS FOR HEART DISEASE

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 12, 2011 at 9:41 am

MORE BAD NEWS ABOUT AVAILABLE US TREATMENTS FOR HEART DISEASE

Most Americans with the biggest risks for heart disease are not doing enough to control these risks, and the fragmented U.S. healthcare system is partly to blame, federal health officials said on Tuesday…

U.S. health system not helping heart disease: CDC

OPTIC NERVE HYPOPLASIA, SEPTO-OPTIC DYSPLASIA, MACULAR DEGENERATION and OPTIC CHEMICAL BURNS

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 11, 2011 at 9:41 am

Until she was 15, Morse had 20/4,000 vision in one eye and only light perception in the other due to optic nerve hypoplasia, or an underdevelopment of the nerve that transmits vision signals from the eye to the brain. She could make out human figures but not see details, could only read if the paper was within inches of her eye, and could only watch TV standing with her nose pressed to the glass…

After raising $15,000 from community donations, the mother and daughter set out for China on July 4…

She received spinal injections of cord blood stem cells each week for six weeks. After her third treatment, she realized she could read and knew the treatments were working…

More info on OPTIC NERVE HYPOPLASIA, SEPTO-OPTIC DYSPLASIA, MACULAR DEGENERATION and OPTIC CHEMICAL BURNS:

Treatment with adult stem cells, due to the amazing transformation from blindness to sight, are some of the most powerful success stories in adult stem cell treatments.

·         Macie Morse from Colorado before stem cells had 20/4000 vision in one eye and in the other eye she only had “light perception,” she could only make out light.  Also, she could only watch TV with her nose pressed against the glass. After treatment she had 20/80 vision in one eye and the other is 20/400+.  She is now driving her family’s van and enjoying her new driving permit. http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/02/16/stem-cells-optic-nerve-hypoplasia-victory/

·         Jakob Bielski from Canada received stem cell treatment because he couldn’t see at all and had no response to light.  After the Cord Blood Stem Cells Were Implanted he has some vision, can respond to visual information and responds to light.

·         Dakota Clarke’s mother said “It’s been worth every single penny to see the changes in her.”

·         Coby Fend’s mother said ““We are talking about going back — we’d almost be crazy not to, because right now it’s the best thing going in the entire world.”

·         Connor Corkern’s mother said: “He’s doing great. He is doing wonderful. It’s like we’ve got a totally new baby.”

·         Cameron Petersen’s Grandma said: “There was nothing for Cameron before this treatment. Now, his world is limitless.”

·         Lydia Black’s father said: “the treatment is already having a huge effect on her life, and he is glad that she was able to receive stem cell treatment…”

·         Savannah Watring’s mother said: “She said hello to herself in an elevator (after seeing her reflection). It blew everyone away. We weren’t expecting that.”

·         Xavier Carballo’s ophthalmologist, Dr. Jack Guggino of Tampa, said he did a baseline exam on the boy before the trip to China and after his return. Before the treatment Xavier could only detect hand motion at 1 to 2 feet, and after the treatment he could count fingers at 3 to 4 feet.  “As far as Xavier is concerned, there has been definite and measurable improvement, neurologically and ophthalmologically,” Guggino said.

·         Lawrence Brown III looks at the number “10” on a family laptop and tells his mother Georgina Brown what the number is as part of a daily exercise to see if his sight is improving. For most people, it is insignificant.  But for Lawrence, 16, who has been blind since birth, it was an exceptional moment.“They call it a really good placebo effect,” Lawrence said. “Whatever, if it’s a placebo effect, I want some more.” http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/08/09/stem-cell-therapy-shows-results-el-paso-times/

·         Blind Man Can See Again After Stem Cell Therapy – A man blinded after having ammonia squirted in his eye is now able to see again thanks to adult stem cells taken from his own body.  Russell Turnbull, 38, from England had therapy using stem cells taken from his other eye in a research study in London.

·         A study in the New England Journal of Medicine on 112 patients with corneal damage from chemical burns whom received treatment.  After adult stem cell treatment, a permanent restoration of a transparent, renewing corneal epithelium was attained in 76.6% of eyes. The restored eyes remained stable over time, with up to 10 years of follow-up (mean, 2.91±1.99; median, 1.93).  http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/06/24/chemically-burned-eyes-repaired-with-stem-cells/

VIDEO: Meet Sam, a visual artist who was confronted with the one thing a man in his profession fears most: Compromised vision. In his case his ability to see clearly was being undermined by age-related macular degeneration (AMD.) His Doctor harvests and uses a patient’s own stem cell-rich bone marrow to help effect healing. Sam discerned improvements in his vision within the first ten days following his treatment and siz weeks later the vision in his left eye had improved while that in his right eye was now normal.

If you or a loved one interested in receiving FREE information on currently available stem cell treatments for OPTIC NERVE HYPOPLASIA, SEPTO-OPTIC DYSPLASIA, MACULAR DEGENERATION and OPTIC CHEMICAL BURNS, please contact me at dsgrano@gmail.com or for other options, go to: CONTACT ME

AUTISM/ASPERGER’S + STEM CELLS

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 10, 2011 at 9:41 am

A friend asked:

when are they going to allow us to use stem cells for autism in this country??? I am getting impatient every treatment center I’ve called here (in the US) says they wont do it! I am having a baby in feb and want to use the cord blood for my son but when will I ever be able to? anyone know?

WHY NO STEM CELLS IN THE US (FOR AUTISM)? – http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/why-no-stem-cells-in-the-us/

STEM CELLS FOR AUTISM – PROGRESS TO DATE – http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/26/stem-cells-for-autism/

POTENTIAL OF STEM CELL TREATMENTS FOR AUTISM – http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/potential-of-stem-cell-treatments-for-autism/

TREATMENTS AVAILABLE TODAY – Asperger’s is an Autism Spectrum Disorder.  To see if you or your loved one might be a candidate for Stem Cell Therapy, contact me at dsgrano@gmail.com

CDC VACCINE COVER UP – MERCURY ACTUALLY DOES CAUSE AUTISM? Central Figure in CDC Vaccine Cover-Up Absconds With $2M

THE COST OF NOT PURSUING ADULT STEM CELL TREATMENTS IN THE USA

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on February 9, 2011 at 9:40 am
COST BY DISEASE # OF PATIENTS COST PER YEAR
TYPE 1 DIABETES 5.8 MILLION PATIENTS $125.1 BILLION
STROKE 5.7 MILLION PATIENTS $62.7 BILLION
HEART FAILURE 5.2 MILLION PATIENTS $50.7 BILLION
SPINAL CORD INJURY 250,000 PATIENTS $37.2 BILLION
PARKINSON’S DISEASE 650,000 PATIENTS $23 BILLION

TOTAL COST THAT ADULT STEM CELLS COULD SAVE THE UNITED STATES

$250 BILLION PER YEAR


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