DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘brain’

1st STEPS TO LAB MADE GRAY MATTER

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on March 6, 2014 at 5:31 pm

ZOMBIES REJOICE!

http://8e8460c4912582c4e519-11fcbfd88ed5b90cfb46edba899033c9.r65.cf1.rackcdn.com/sales/cardscans/SLEEVE/Sleeves_Zombie.jpg

1st STEPS TO LABMADE GRAY MATTER, aka…
B  R  A  I  N  S  S  S  S  ! ! !
Also patients with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, TBI, Ataxia…
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22029473.800-grow-a-new-brain-first-steps-to-labmade-grey-matter.html#.Uxj1DIWGZp3
via http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0142961213013045

Stem Cells Improve Cognition After Brain Injury | Beyond the Dish

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on November 5, 2013 at 2:20 pm
http://repairstemcell.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/8c5a1-strokebrainimage.jpg?w=249&h=332
Stem Cells Improve Cognition After Brain Injury

Research led by Charles Cox at the University of Texas Health Science Center has shown that stem cell therapy given during the critical time window after traumatic brain injury promotes lasting cognitive improvement. These experiments, which were published in the latest issue of the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, provide a pre-clinical model for experiments with larger animals.

After the brain has suffered a traumatic injury, there are few treatment options. Damage to the brain can be severe, and can also cause ongoing neurological impairment. Approximately half of all patients with severe head injuries need surgery to remove or repair ruptured blood vessels or bruised brain tissue.

In this work from Cox’s lab, stem cells from bone marrow known as multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) were used. MAPCs seem to be a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells, and they have a documented ability to reduce inflammation in mice immediately after traumatic brain injury. Unfortunately, no one has measured the ability of MAPCs to improve the condition of the brain over time.

Cox, Distinguished Professor of Pediatric Surgery at the UTHealth Medical School and in collaboration with the Children’s Fund, Inc., injected two groups of brain-injured mice with MAPCs two hours after injury and then once again 24 hours later. One group received a dose of 2 million cells per kilogram and the other a dose five times greater.

After four months, those mice that had received the stronger dose not only continued to have less inflammation, but they also showed significant gains in cognitive function. Laboratory examination of the brains of these rodents confirmed that those that had received the higher dose of MAPCs had better brain function than those that had received the lower dose.

According to Cox, “Based on our data, we saw improved spatial learning, improved motor deficits and fewer active antibodies in the mice that were given the stronger concentration of MAPCs.” Cox also indicated that this study indicates that intravenous injection of MAPCs might very well become a viable treatment for people with traumatic brain injury in the future.

 

Stem Cells Improve Cognition After Brain Injury | Beyond the Dish.

BLOOD, HEART AND BRAIN STEM CELLS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 11, 2013 at 10:40 am

stem cell science

Science daily is an excellent source for medical article and studies.  I’ve received their feed for quite a while now.  Here, are 3 stem cell articles from today.

  1. Blood stem cells, besides turning into hema type cells can also become white blood cells.
  2. Cardiac stem cells from bone marrow can heal the heart.  This we’ve known since the late 90’s but additional confirmation is always appreciated.
  3. Brain stem cells not only can turn into brain and nerve cells but they also clear out the garbage in the brain and keep the cells in a perpetual stem cell state.

These are 3 good stem cell articles but also of note…

This is the first time Science Daily has had three stem cell articles in their feed.  The world is turning to stem cells.  Are you?

———————————————-

Surprising ability of blood stem cells to respond to emergencies

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410131227.htm 

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 10:12 AM PDT

Scientists have revealed an unexpected role for hematopoietic stem cells: They do not merely ensure the continuous renewal of our blood cells; in emergencies they are capable of producing white blood cells “on demand” that help the body deal with inflammation or infection. This property could be used to protect against infections in patients undergoing bone marrow transplants, while their immune system reconstitutes itself.

 

Cardiopoietic ‘smart’ stem cells show promise in heart failure patients

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410103349.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 07:33 AM PDT

Therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or “smart” stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions.

 

Spring cleaning in your brain’s stem cells?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094120.htm

Posted: 10 Apr 2013 06:41 AM PDT

Deep inside your brain, a legion of stem cells lies ready to turn into new brain and nerve cells when you need them. New research shows the vital role of a type of internal “spring cleaning” that both clears out garbage inside the cells, and keeps them in their perpetual stem-cell state.

YOUR BRAIN CAN CHANGE

In ALL ARTICLES, OFF THE BEATEN PATH on January 25, 2013 at 8:10 am
Neuroplasticity: Brain and Heart Interaction
Arjun November 26, 2012 12

Modern science is progressing in its ability to understand the human brain and the way it functions in relation to the human being. Prior to Neuroplasticity, science assumed that the brain is the primary operating organ that determines everything about human behavior and action. Our brain is one of the most complex biological structures known to man, but science assumes that the brain drives thought, behavior, perception, emotion, disease and health. New discoveries within the  field of neuroscience are starting to illustrate how the brain  is taking instruction from something else. Neuroplasticity is the idea that the brain is adaptable and changeable. It’s now being used to treat learning disabilities, brain damage, chronic pain and more.

“The idea that the brain is plastic in the sense of changeable, adaptable and malleable. Is the single most important change in our understanding of the human brain in four hundred years. Neuroplasticity is that property of the brain that allows it to change it’s structure and it’s function, it’s a response to sensing and perceiving the world, even to thinking and imagining. Human thoughts and learning actually turn on certain genes in our nerve cells which allow those cells to make new connections between them” – Dr. Norman Doidge

Our brain shapes and reshapes itself given how we perceive the environment around us. This is also seen in Phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability of an organism to change it’s observable traits such as morphology, development, biochemical or physiological properties, as well as behavior. All of these things also result from the expression of an organisms genetic structure.   Most human beings have a very similar perception of the world, someone who perceives the world completely differently will have a different brain with different neurological connections and gene activation. If our brain shapes itself according to our thoughts and perception of the environment around us, then who is thinking the thoughts that cause our brain to react? Who is you? With so much information concealed from the human race, with so much information available that could change our perception of the planet concealed from us, what type of gene activation within our nerve cells lay dormant? Who you think you are is not actually you, because who you think you are can always change. The real you, the soul that lies within does not change, who you think you are might.

Our current perception of reality is one that includes consumerism and materialism. It is one of being born, going to school, working to make money, retire and more. We all have a collective perception of how the world is, we all have a similar idea of what the world is like and we all think that we have to follow the same path. Human beings are rapidly waking up to truth, in doing so we change our perception of how things are. Changing our thoughts alone, coupled with our changing perception is activating genes within our nerve cells giving rise to something new. Truth is, that things are not how they seem here on planet earth. The veil that’s been blinding the masses is being lifted, and according to neuroplasticity, a change in perception leads to gene activation.

What we should take away from plasticity is that we have the ability to change our brains, that thoughts and perception are directly responsible to how the brain functions. We should ask ourselves what influences our perception and what possibilities are available to us when we spark gene activation resulting from a paradigm change? We should also ask ourselves, where do our thoughts, feelings and emotions stem from that are responsible for triggering changes within our brain. We should ask ourselves where do our thoughts come from? Are they even our own? After all, consciousness creates reality Quantum double slit experiment

 

COMMON SSRI ANTIDEPRESSANTS CAUSE BRAIN BLEEDING

In DISEASE INFO on October 18, 2012 at 11:16 am

English: Zoloft

“Overall, antidepressant users were about 40 to 50 percent more likely to suffer bleeding in or around the brain, the researchers report in the journal Neurology.”

“The antidepressants are known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and include widely used drugs like fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa) and paroxetine (Paxil).”

Depressed? Go walk around in the dirt with your shoes off. Extensive research has proved the mycobacteria in dirt which releases the same chemicals in your body as SSRIs absorbs through your feet and goes throughout your body. Likewise, studies have shown standing on the earth in barefeet is a much better blood thinner than using drugs with none of the side effects. The sun will give you doses of Vitamin D and the fresh air will replace the tired recycled, toxin filled air in your lungs from spending too much time inside.

Every time as a kid I whined: “I’m bored!” my mom told me to go play outside. How wise is she?

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/17/us-antidepressants-idUSBRE89G1PB20121017?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews

NEW STEM CELL FOUND IN THE BRAIN

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 23, 2012 at 10:08 pm

http://www.bio.miami.edu/~cmallery/150/neuro/brain_stem_cells2.jpg

New stem cell found in the brain

Researchers at Lund University have discovered a new stem cell in the adult brain. These cells can proliferate and form several different cell types – most importantly, they can form new brain cells. Now the researchers hope to put the discovery to use to develop methods that can repair diseases and injury to the brain.

Analysing brain tissue from biopsies, the researchers for the first time found stem cells located around small blood vessels in the brain. The cell’s specific function is still unclear, but its plastic properties suggest great potential. A similar cell type has been identified in several other organs where it can promote regeneration of muscle, bone, cartilage and adipose tissue.

In other organs, researchers have shown clear evidence that these types of cells contribute to repair and wound healing. Scientists suggest that the curative properties may also apply to the brain. The next step is to try to control and enhance stem cell self-healing properties with the aim of carrying out therapies targeted to a specific area of the brain.

“Our findings show that the cell capacity is much larger than we originally thought, and that these cells are very versatile,” said Gesine Paul-Visse, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Lund University.

“Most interesting is their ability to form neuronal cells, but they can also be developed for other cell types. The results contribute to better understanding of how brain cell plasticity works and opens up new opportunities to exploit these very features.”

The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is of interest to a broad spectrum of brain research. Future possible therapeutic targets range from neurodegenerative diseases to stroke.

“We hope that our findings may lead to a new and better understanding of the brain’s own repair mechanisms,” said Dr. Paul-Visse. “Ultimately the goal is to strengthen these mechanisms and develop new treatments that can repair the diseased brain.”

###

Link to the study here:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0035577

The study:

Title: The Adult Human Brain Harbors Multipotent Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells Published in: PLoS ONE, 16 April, 2012.

New stem cell found in the brain.

A history of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and stem cells

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 11, 2012 at 1:43 am

YEARS AWAY FROM A STEM CELL ETA AND ALL WE CAN HOPE FOR TODAY IS DOA…

A history of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

aka Lou Gehrig’s disease

and stem cell treatments for humans going back to 2001.

OVERVIEW:

More stem cells in Lou Gehrig’s disease

29 Sep 2009 | 19:51 BST | Posted by Monya Baker | Category:

Shortly after my coverage of the FDA’s approval for NeuralStem’s stem-cell trial for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis appeared on the Niche, Letizia Mazzini and Franca Fagioli of Eastern Piedmont University contacted me to tell me about their team’s work using mesenchymal stem cells for the same disease. While Neuralstem is moving forward with neural stem cells, Mazzini and colleagues have been exploring the use of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the patient who will receive them. She has recently published results of a Phase I trial as well as a review of stem-cell approaches in ALS. Unfortunately, I learned of this work only after I’d posted.
Here is their letter:

We have just read, not without some interest, the NeuralStem communicate. The trial is presented as if it were the first clinical study with stem cells in ALS (“This is the first stem-cell approach for ALS” says Lucie Bruijin). However, this needs to be rectified as we conducted two phase 1 clinical trials one in 2001 (Mazzini et al., 2008)) and the other in 2007 (Mazzini L et al., 2009). The trials were approved respectively by the regional Ethical Committee and by the Italian Institute of Health and by the and were designed to test the safety and the feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into the spinal cord of ALS patients.

MSC were isolated from patients’ bone marrow, in vitro expanded for 3-4 passages and evaluated for quality control as requested by national rules on advanced therapies. In neither of our trials were there any immediate or delayed transplant related toxicities. Stem cells were transplanted into the spinal cord at the thoracic levels with a surgical approach. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic evaluations of the patients showed no serious transplant related adverse events. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed no structural changes (including tumor formation) in either the brain or the spinal cord.

Furthermore, we also demonstrated that expanded MSCs can survive and migrate after transplantation in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1-G93A mice, where they prevent astrogliosis and microglial activation and delay the ALS-related decrease in the number of motor neurons, resulting in an amelioration of motor performance (Vercelli A et al., 2008 ). Therefore we concluded that MSCs represent a good source of stem cells for future ALS cell based clinical trials.

Thus, the NeuralStem trial, as it appears, shows this experimental design to be no different to our studies except for the cell type: neural stem cell derived from a 8-week fetus.

Letizia Mazzini, MD ALS Centre, Dpt of Neurology ,Eastern Piedmont University Maggiore della Carità Hospital Novara, Italy

Franca Fagioli, MD Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Unit Pediatric Onco-Hematology Department Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital Torino. Italy

References

1.Mazzini, L. & Mareschi, K.& Ferrero, I.& Vassallo, E.& Oliveri, G.& Nasuelli, N.& Oggioni, GD.& Testa, L.& Fagioli F. Stem cell treatment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Journal of the Neurological Sciences 265 (2008) 78–83 (PubMed link)

2. Mazzini L, Ferrero I, Luparello V, Rustichelli D, Gunetti M, Mareschi K, Testa L, Stecco A, Tarletti R, Miglioretti M, Fava E, Nasuelli N, Cisari C, Massara M, Vercelli R, Oggioni GD, Carriero A, Cantello R, Monaco F, Fagioli F Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A Phase I clinical trial.Exp Neurol. 2009 Aug 13. (PubMed link)

3. Alessandro Vercelli, Oana M Mereuta, MD; Diego Garbossa, MD; Giuseppe Muraca; Katia Mareschi; Deborah Rustichelli; Ivana Ferrero; Letizia Mazzini, MD; Enrico Madon, MD; Franca Fagioli, MD Human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation extends survival, improves motor performance and decreases neuroinflammation in mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Neurobiology of disease. 31 (2008) 395–405 (PubMed link)

 

ADDITIONAL STUDIES IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER (may be some repetition)

2003 – Stem cell therapy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a methodological approach in humans
Our results appear to demonstrate that the procedures of ex vivo expansion of autologous mesenchymal stem cells and of transplantation into the spinal cord of humans are safe and well tolerated by ALS patients.  Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14660820310014653

 

2003 – Amyotroph Lateral Scler Other Motor Neuron Disord  – Letizia Mazzini and colleagues (Amyotroph Lateral Scler Other Motor Neuron Disord 2003; 4: 158—61) injected autologous bone-marrow-derived stem cells into the spinal cord of seven ALS patients. These investigators reported that the procedure had a reasonable margin of clinical safety. http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2804%2916634-8/fulltext

 

2007 – Stem cell treatment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Journal of the Neurological Sciences xx (2007) xxx– xxx – The results of the long term follow-up (more than 4 years) confirm that intraspinal injection of MSCs in ALS patients is safe as previously reported. – http://fondazionevialliemauro.it/eng/PDF/JNS.pdf


2008 – Stem cell treatment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Journal of the Neurological SciencesVolume 265, Issue 1 , Pages 78-83, 15 February 2008 – Our results seem to demonstrate that MSCs represent a good chance for stem cell cell-based therapy in ALS and that intraspinal injection of MSCs is safe also in the long term. A new phase 1 study is carried out to verify these data in a larger number of patients.


2009 – Stem Cell treatment of ALS has a history of success since Feb

“In a [February, 2009] published clinical stem cell research study, adult stem cells were shown to help delay Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) progression and improve an ALS patient’s quality of life. This research study was believed to be the first published study comparing ALS patients who had their own stem cells injected into their brain vs a control group…

The initial two year clinical test study results of the stem cell procedure was published in Cytotherapy, February, 2009. Positive results were confirmed through both clinical observation and MRI tractography.  It is considered by many within the international neurological community to be the foremost procedure available for minimizing or abrogating ALS symptoms and extending the lifespan of ALS patients. The procedure is a state of the art use of autologous CD-133 (+) stem cells injected into the frontal cortices for the effective replacement of motor neurons.”

 

ALS adult stem cell trial = safe and effective

The initial two year clinical test study results of the stem cell procedure instituted by Hospital San Jose Tecnologico de Monterrey, was published in Cytotherapy, February, 2009. Positive results were confirmed through both clinical observation and MRI tractography. It is considered by many within the international neurological community to be the foremost procedure available for minimizing or abrogating ALS symptoms and extending the lifespan of ALS patients. The procedure is a state of the art use of autologous CD-133 (+) stem cells injected into the frontal cortices for the effective replacement of motor neurons.
Via http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2012/01/19/als-adult-stem-cell-trial-safe-and-effective-reuters/
THE TRIAL: http://www.alsworldwide.net/pdfs/monterey_hospital.pdf

 

2012 – BrainStorm sees positive data in ALS stem cell trial

TEL AVIVTue Jan 17, 2012 12:07am EST –  (Reuters) – Data from the first ALS patients in a clinical trial treated with BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics adult stem cell therapy did not show significant side effects and the treatment has so far proven to be safe, the company said on Tuesday…http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/17/us-brainstorm-trial-embargoed-idUSTRE80G07Q20120117?feedType=nl&feedName=ushealth1100

CEREBRAL PALSY AND STEM CELLS

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 10, 2012 at 10:24 am

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/little-lucass-stem-cell-hope/
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/08/28/cord-blood-wakes-up-drowning-victim%e2%80%99s-brain/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/shiu-sisters-cp-and-rop-adult-stem-cell-patients/

Duke U. CLINICAL TRIAL for Cerebral Palsy & other newborn brain injuries – http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00593242?term=hypoxic+ischemic+encephalopathy&rank=3 – for more information – http://parentsguidecordblood.org/content/usa/medical/autocbt.shtml or for anecdotal info – Abby , Chloe, Dallas

Dallas Hextell, a 2-year-old from Sacramento, California, received an infusion of his own umbilical cord blood as part of the Duke University clinical trial. Within five days, he showed improvements in the limitations imposed by the condition.  video: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/23569985#23569985
via http://www.youhavealawyer.com/blog/2008/03/26/cerebral-palsy-improvement/

“a toddler with cerebral palsy, who experienced dramatic improvements in his disability following an experimental procedure involving a stem cell transplant.” – http://pediatrics.duke.edu/modules/dept_peds_annc/index.php?id=79\

Cerebral Palsy: Cord Blood Stem Cell Research and Treatment in Clinical Trials – Update

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

For those of  you who follow our blogs, you know well that this is a topic of interest for us.  It bears repeating – our job as lawyers is to properly investigate potential claims of malpractice in areas such as cerebral palsy and seek redress for our clients when the evidence demonstrates a connection between birth injuries and medical care, but the much more important topic for our clients and victims of cerebral palsy is in the field of medical research. It is through research efforts – including clinical trials – that this dreaded condition will be ameliorated and hopefully eradicated. Trust me, after practicing law for over 35 years, I’m not worried about job security – the frailties of the human condition will more than suffice to fill our file cabinets with people to help due to the negligence of others.

We have reported previously on various topics involving cord blood and stem cell research as they relate to a number of conditions, including cerebral palsy.  It seems that months have passed since there has been any significant news about two programs underway: one at the Medical College of Georgia and the other at Duke.  Earlier this month, an update came across the social media network via a post by Singularity Hub – Cord Blood Stem Cell Treatment for Cerebral Palsy in Clinical Trial | Singularity Hub.

Here’s our encapsulated version regarding the studies and Singularity Hub’s report.

Photo provided by MSNBC

Duke University

According to the website ClincalTrials.gov, Duke began a clinical therapeutic trial – identifier: NCT00593242 - in January 2008 (estimated completion date of January 2011) whose primary purpose is listed as treatment of newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) – inadequate oxygenation in the perinatal period for purposes of this study – through the controlled “collection, preparation and infusion of a baby’s own (autologous) umbilical cord blood in the first 14 days after birth if the baby is born with signs of brain injury.” For information concerning the inclusion and exclusion criteria for participation in this clinical trial, see the online posting. Essentially, the babies are then to be “followed for neurodevelopmental outcome at 4 – 6 and 9 – 12 months at Duke’s Special Infant Care Clinic. MRI’s will be obtained between postnatal weeks 1 and 4, and, for study purposes at 4 – 6 postnatal months.”

While other aspects of processing and administration are no doubt part of the key components of this project, it is readily apparent that the end-point goal is discovery of an effective treatment of cerebral palsy for the identified neonates in the study and then development of a second stage clinical trial to take such treatment modality to a greater number of potential beneficiaries.

Medical College of Georgia

For detailed information on this study, which began in February of this year, similar information is available through ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01072370.  This clinical trial investigation has a patient population consisting of children from ages of 2 to 12, “whose parents have saved their infant’s cord blood, who have non-progressive motor disability, and whose parents intend to have a cord blood infusion.”  Again – for full details regarding inclusion and exclusion criteria, see the full online posting.

For those parents who may be interested in determining if their child would qualify to participate, the study is still recruiting participants.  The contact information is also available at this link: Contact: James E Carroll, M.D.     706-721-3371     jcarroll@mcg.edu

Today’s report from Singularity Hub provides some encouraging – albeit anecdotal – news of potential progress.

The anecdotal evidence in support of treating cerebral palsy with cord blood stem cells is astounding. Much of it has actually been been performed at Duke University by one of the investigators in the pilot study: Joanne Kurtzberg. Among those that have been successfully treated at Duke include Ryan Schneider, Maia Friedlander, Chloe Levine, and Dallas Hextell. All had CP or CP-like symptoms and all made remarkable recoveries after cord blood stem cell treatments. Dallas Hextell, who showed improvements just 5 days after his therapy was featured on the Today show (the original report contains video compliments of MSNBC).

In addition to the early good news coming out of these projects, one other lesson is learned – for the time being, the storage of cord blood is an important component for those hoping to participate in such studies – particularly that being conducted at the Medical College of Georgia.  We have earlier reported on this topic as well.  You may want to refer to our early posting for some basic information if you are interested.

Obviously, the implications – if these projects prove to be successful – are far-reaching. The enthusiasm of the participants in these research projects is not limited to them alone. The words of the author, Aaron Saenz, from Singularity Hub somewhat tells it all:

So we have some exciting news for cerebral palsy, and some exciting news for those thinking about cord blood. What about the rest of us? Well the MCG and Duke work has some far reaching implications. Neurological damage, whether it’s caused by oxygen deprivation or some other injury, is one of the most difficult things to heal in the body. Work in animals (like that done by Carroll on rats) show that stem cells can not only help damaged brain cells recover, but they can also replace cells that have died. We may find that stem cells therapies have a wide range of applications for many different forms of brain damage. Kurtzberg is researching many different ways cord blood could be used (autologous or through donors) to treat a variety of conditions. In other words, today stem cells conquer cerebral palsy…tomorrow, the world.

Let’s all hope that Mr. Saenz is a prophet.

 

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/10/24/the-challenging-life-of-a-young-man-with-cp-neil-barron/

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY and STROKE

In DISEASE INFO on March 26, 2012 at 1:17 am

TO SEE IF YOU ARE A CANDIDATE FOR STEM CELL TREATMENT, PLEASE FILL OUT THE FOLLOWING FORM:  STEM CELL PATIENT QUESTIONNAIRE

I was told this was a con…here is my response:

My Stem Cells vs. Stroke page:
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/stroke-stem-cells/

Additional articles sorted by date (YEAR/MONTH/DAY):
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2012/03/06/stem-cells-safe-for-young-traumatic-brain-injury/
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/cellnews-scientists-learn-how-stem-cell-implants-help-heal-traumatic-brain-injury/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110831160216.htm
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/regenerating-the-central-nervous-system/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/stem-cell-treatment-for-stroke-and-traumatic-brain-injury-wholewellness-net/
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/autologous-neural-stem-cells-benefit-parkinson%e2%80%99s-patients-adultstemcell-com/
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/stem-cell-treatment-for-stroke-and-traumatic-brain-injury-wholewellness-net/
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/08/28/cord-blood-wakes-up-drowning-victim%e2%80%99s-brain/
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-stem-cells-block-stroke-damage
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/stem-cell-gel-helps-repair-traumatic-brain-injuries-smartplanet/
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-stem-cells-block-stroke-damage
http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/04/28/stem-cells-from-menstrual-blood-may-benefit-stroke-patients/

http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/04/20/stem-cell-research-shows-adult-stem-cells-help-stroke-victims-adult-stem-cell-research/
http://www.texmedctr.tmc.edu/root/en/TMCServices/News/2009/07-01/Stem+Cells+Tested+for+Treatment+of+Stroke.htm

A con? Ok my skeptical friends, I understand. You’ve been researching stroke treatments for so long and been so disheartened you don’t believe your condition can ever improve. You’ve read all the outdated literature saying the central nervous system can not regrow (except for the most recent studies which prove it can be.) You’ve skimmed my articles and realize they are uncorroborated by “hard science.”

Fair enough. Ignore the 14 articles above which show the positive benefits of adult stem cells on stroke. You’re right, they are unsubstantiated. They are not peer reviewed medical journal articles. I appreciate your skepticism but know this:

*there are over 2,600 peer reviewed medical journal clinical trials that utilized adult stem cells with a record of safety and efficacy,
*there are many trials that cover the use of adult stem cells for stroke, ataxia, TBI, etc
*there are 60 trials that have the key words “adult stem cell” and “stroke.”
*there are 14 “Completed” trials that have the key words “adult stem cell” and “stroke.”

Research it yourself if you like. http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=adult+stem+cell+stroke&pg=1&show_flds=Y

Here are only the 14 “completed” trials:

Completed Efficacy Study of CD34 Stem Cell in Chronic Stroke Patients

Conditions: Stroke;   Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Interventions: Procedure: Intercerebral implantation of Autulogous Stem Cells;   Drug: convention therapy
Completed Intravenous Autologous Bone Marrow-derived Stem Cells Therapy for Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke

Condition: Acute Stroke
Intervention: Biological: Autologous bone marrow stem cell
Completed Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Middle Cerebral Artery Acute Stroke Treatment.

Conditions: Stroke, Acute;   Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery
Intervention: Procedure: Infusion on autologous CD34+ stem cells into middle cerebral artery
Completed Study of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients With Ischemic Stroke

Condition: Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery
Intervention: Other: Autologous cell transplantation
21 Completed Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Stem Cells Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

Condition: Ischemic Stroke
Intervention: Drug: Filgrastim
31 Completed Sickle Cell Disease and Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs)

Condition: Sickle Cell Anemia
Intervention: Procedure: Angiography
34 Completed Investigating Endothelial Precursor Cells (EPCs)

Condition: Central Nervous System
Intervention:
38 Completed Immunological Mechanisms of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Sclerosis

Condition: Multiple Sclerosis
Intervention: Procedure: Stem Cell Transplanataion
40 Completed Gene Therapy for Gaucher’s and Fabry Disease Using Viruses and Blood-Forming Cells

Condition: Gaucher’s Disease
Intervention: Genetic: human glucocerebrosidase cDNA
51 Completed Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics (PK) Study of Novel Neurogenic Compound NSI-189

Condition: Depression
Intervention: Drug: NSI-189 Phosphate
52 Completed Beta-hCG + Erythropoietin in Acute Stroke

Condition: Acute Stroke
Intervention: Drug: Beta-hCG + Erythropoietin
54 Completed Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Autistic Children: A Pilot Study

Conditions: Autism;   Oxidative Stress;   Inflammation
Intervention: Drug: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
59 Completed Effects of Enzyme Replacement in Gaucher’s Disease

Condition: Gaucher’s Disease
Intervention:
60 Completed Incidence of Ocular Antibodies in Patients With Sturge – Weber Syndrome (SWS)

Condition: Sturge – Weber Syndrome (SWS)
Intervention:

 

 

If you still feel this is a con, tell me what you would need to see to prove otherwise. Respectfully, David

Stem Cells Safe for Young Traumatic Brain Injury

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on March 6, 2012 at 4:02 am
Image showing potential uses of stem cell research with traumatic brain injuries checked.
A Phase 1 clinical trial studying the safety of using bone marrow stem cells to treat traumatic brain injuries in children is reported. The procedures look to be safe even after 6 months of being applied. The image is adapted from a public domain image

Bone Marrow Stem Cells Safe for Young Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

Saturday March 3rd 2012

A procedure involving stem cells taken from patients’ own bone marrow to treat traumatic brain injury in children is safe, according to the results of a Phase 1 clinical trial.

The trial included 10 children aged 5-14 with severe traumatic brain injuries. Within 48 hours of their injuries, the children received stem cells processed from their own bone marrow.

Six months following the procedures, the children are showing no signs of further damage caused by the use of the stem cells. Though this study only points out that the procedure is safe so far, all of the children from the study had significant improvements.

Stem cell research studies such as this one are producing more and more evidence that stem cell treatments can be safe and effective.

With very few effective treatments for brain injury patients, these studies provide great promise for the future of medicine.

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston press release below offers more details about this and other stem cell studies.

UTHealth study: Stem cells may provide treatment for brain injuries

Preliminary results show safety of bone marrow stem cells in traumatic brain injury

Stem cells derived from a patient’s own bone marrow were safely used in pediatric patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to results of a Phase I clinical trial at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The results were published in this month’s issue of Neurosurgery, the journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

“Our data demonstrate that the acute harvest of bone marrow and infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells to acutely treat severe TBI in children is safe,” said Charles S. Cox, Jr., M.D., the study’s lead author and professor of pediatric neurosurgery at the UTHealth Medical School. The clinical trial, which included 10 children aged 5 to 14 with severe TBI, was done in partnership with Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital, where Cox is director of the pediatric trauma program.

All the children were treated within 48 hours of their injury with their own stem cells, which were collected from their bone marrow, processed and returned to them intravenously. UTHealth’s Department of Neurology is also currently testing the same bone marrow stem cell procedure in adults with acute stroke. In a separate trial, Cox is testing the safety of using a patient’s own cord blood stem cells for traumatic brain injury in children.

As a Phase I trial designed to look at feasibility and safety, the study did not assess efficacy. However, after six months of follow-up, all of the children had significant improvement and seven of the 10 children had a “good outcome,” meaning no or only mild disability.

Children who survive severe TBI are often left with serious complications and disability. Currently, there are no effective treatments to protect or promote repair of the brain in these brain-injured children.

Read more: Bone Marrow Stem Cells Safe for Young Traumatic Brain Injury Patients | Neuroscience News.

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