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Posts Tagged ‘BONE’

Stem Cell Transplantation in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 23, 2014 at 5:59 pm

Stem Cell Transplantation in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies

http://www.accesssportsmed.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/spine_large.jpg

From http://www.plosbiology.org – January 6, 7:09 AM

Spinal cord injury is an important cause of disability in young adults, and stem cells have been proposed as a possible treatment. Here we systematically assess the evidence in the scientific literature for the effectiveness of stem-cell–based therapies in animal models of spinal cord injury.

Ella Buzhor\’s insight:

The comparison between multiple allogeneic stem cell treatments revealed improved both motor and sensory function in SCI animal models. Differentiation prior to implantation and IV route of cell administration yielded better outcomes.

via Cell Therapy & Regenerative Medicine | Scoop.it.

MS patient to take part in pioneering experiment – CBS News

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 21, 2014 at 1:42 pm

No mention of the words “stem cell” in the headline.  No mention of stem cells until the 6th paragraph.  Why make it so difficult for patients to find these articles? In any case, we eagerly await the results! -dg

“Stem cells can be morphed into any cell in the body. Patients like Quinn have bone marrow removed and the stem cells inside are then changed in the kind of stem cells found in the brain and spinal cord.

Those cells will then be injected directly into the spinal cord. The hope is that they will repair the insulation and perhaps even the wires underneath.”

via MS patient to take part in pioneering experiment – CBS News.

 

RELATED ARTICLES:

  • FDA Approves Stem Cell Clinical Trial For Multiple Sclerosis

“To my knowledge, this is the first FDA-approved stem cell trial in the United States to investigate direct injection of stem cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients, and represents an exciting advance in MS research and treatment,” said Dr. Saud A. Sadiq, Senior Research Scientist at Tisch MS Research Center of New York and the study’s principal investigator.

The groundbreaking study will investigate a regenerative strategy using stem cells harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow.  These stem cells will be injected intrathecally (into the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord) in 20 participants who meet the inclusion criteria for the trial.  This will be an open label safety and tolerability study.  All study activities will be conducted at the Tisch MS Research Center and affiliated International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice (IMSMP).”  via http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fda-approves-stem-cell-clinical-trial-for-multiple-sclerosis-219553021.html

  • Meredith Vieira’s Family Health Battle

12/12/2013 – Dr Oz and Dr Tisch discuss MS and stem cells http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/meredith-vieiras-family-health-battle?

Belgian scientists repair bones with new stem cell technique – CBS News

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS, VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 16, 2014 at 12:49 pm

A piece of a three-dimensional bone structure obtained from the own adipose stem cells of a patient is seen at Brussels’ Saint Luc Hospital January 14, 2014. Belgian medical researchers have succeeded in repairing bones using stem cells from fatty tissue, with a new technique they believe could become a benchmark for treating a range of bone disorders. REUTERS

BRUSSELS  – Belgian medical researchers have succeeded in repairing bones using stem cells from fatty tissue, with a new technique they believe could become a benchmark for treating a range of bone disorders.

The team at the Saint Luc university clinic hospital in Brussels have treated 11 patients, eight of them children, with fractures or bone defects that their bodies could not repair, and a spin-off is seeking investors to commercialize the discovery.

Doctors have for years harvested stem cells from bone marrow at the top of the pelvis and injected them back into the body to repair bone.

The ground-breaking technique of Saint Luc’s centre for tissue and cellular therapy is to remove a sugar cube sized piece of fatty tissue from the patient, a less invasive process than pushing a needle into the pelvis and with a stem cell concentration they say is some 500 times higher.

The stem cells are then isolated and used to grow bone in the laboratory. Unlike some technologies, they are also not attached to a solid and separate ‘scaffold’.

“Normally you transplant only cells and you cross your fingers that it functions,” the centre’s coordinator Denis Dufrane told Reuters television.

His work has been published in Biomaterials journal and was presented at an annual meeting of the International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics and Science (IFATS) in New York in November.

 

2014-01-15T161731Z_858177456_GM1EA1F1UL301_RTRMADP_3_BELGIUM-MEDICINE.JPG

Belgian Professor Denis Defrane, coordinator of the centre of tissue and cellular therapy of Brussels’ Saint Luc Hospital, shows how a hole in the tibia of a patient suffering from a disease was treated on an x-ray, in Belgium January 14, 2014.
REUTERS

 

Bone Formation

“It is complete bone tissue that we recreate in the bottle and therefore when we do transplants in a bone defect or a bone hole…you have a higher chance of bone formation.”

The new material in a lab dish resembles more plasticine than bone, but can be molded to fill a fracture, rather like a dentist’s filling in a tooth, hardening in the body.

Some of those treated have included people recovering from tumors that had to be removed from bones. One 13-year-old boy, with a fracture and disorder that rendered him unable to repair bone, could resume sports within 14 months of treatment.

“Our hope is to propose this technology directly in emergency rooms to reconstitute bones when you have a trauma or something like that,” Dufrane said.

A spin-off founded last year called Novadip Biosciences will seek to commercialize the treatment, initially to allow spinal fusion among elderly people with degenerated discs.

It may also seek to create a bank of bone tissue from donors rather than the patients themselves.

IFATS president Marco Helder, based at Amsterdam’s VU university medical centre, said the novelty was the lack of solid scaffold.

“It is interesting and it is new, but it will have limitations regarding load-bearing capacity and, as with other implants, it will need to connect to the blood vessels of the body rapidly to avoid dying off,” he said, adding:

“Any foreign object can cause irritation and problems, so the fact that this is just host tissue would be an advantage.”

Belgian scientists repair bones with new stem cell technique – CBSNews.

 

RELATED STORY:

Critical size bone defect reconstruction by an autologous 3D osteogenic-like tissue derived from differentiated adipose MSCs.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23507085

SCIENCE FICTION COMES ALIVE WITH ORGANS GROWN IN A LAB

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 26, 2013 at 9:00 am

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Building a complex human organ in the lab is no longer a dream of science fiction. At London’s Royal Free Hospital, a team of 30 scientists is manufacturing a variety of body parts, including windpipes, noses and ears. WSJ’s Gautam Naik reports. Photo: Gareth Phillips

Science Fiction Comes Alive as Researchers Grow Organs in Lab

MADRID—Reaching into a stainless steel tray, Francisco Fernandez-Aviles lifted up a gray, rubbery mass the size of a fat fist.  It was a human cadaver heart that had been bathed in industrial detergents until its original cells had been washed away and all that was left was what scientists call the scaffold.  Next, said Dr. Aviles, “We need to make the heart come alive.”

Inside a warren of rooms buried in the basement of Gregorio Marañón hospital here, Dr. Aviles and his team are at the sharpest edge of the bioengineering revolution that has turned the science-fiction dream of building replacement parts for the human body into a reality.  Since a laboratory in North Carolina made a bladder in 1996, scientists have built increasingly more complex organs. There have been five windpipe replacements so far. A London researcher, Alex Seifalian, has transplanted lab-grown tear ducts and an artery into patients. He has made an artificial nose he expects to transplant later this year in a man who lost his nose to skin cancer.

“The work has been extraordinarily pioneering,” said Sir Roy Calne, an 82-year-old British surgeon who figured out in the 1950s how to use drugs to prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs.

Now, with the quest to build a heart, researchers are tackling the most complex organ yet. The payoff could be huge, both medically and financially, because so many people around the world are afflicted with heart disease. Researchers see a multi billion dollar market developing for heart parts that could repair diseased hearts and clogged arteries.

In additional to the artificial nose, Dr. Seifalian is making cardiovascular body parts. He sees a time when scientists would grow the structures needed for artery bypass procedures instead of taking a vein from another part the body. As part of a clinical trial, Dr. Seifalian plans to transplant a bio-engineered coronary artery into a person later this year. His employer, University College London, has designated a person to oversee any future commercialization of it and other man-made organs.

The development of lab-built body parts is being spurred by a shortage of organ donors amid rising demand for transplants. Also, unlike patients getting transplants, recipients of lab-built organs won’t have to take powerful anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. That’s because the bio-engineered organs are built with the patients’ own cells.

Until the late 1980s, few scientists believed it would be possible to make human organs because it was a struggle to grow human cells in the laboratory. The task became easier once scientists figured out the chemicals—known as growth factors—that the body itself uses to promote cellular growth.

Scientists started out growing simple organs. In 1999, Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., implanted lab-grown bladders into the first of several children with severely dysfunctional bladders. The organs have continued to function well for several years. Dr. Atala’s team now is trying to grow a whole range of bio-engineered parts, from simple blood vessels to human livers.

Some of the most complex work is under way at Dr. Seifalian’s laboratory.   A 56-year-old native of Iran, Dr. Seifalian started out as a nuclear physicist, and became interested in medical uses of nuclear technology. That ultimately led him to bioengineering.  In 2011, Dr. Seifalian made a windpipe from a patient’s cells. It was used to replace the cancerous windpipe of the patient, saving his life, his surgeon has said.

Dr. Seifalian and 30 scientists now seek to build a larynx, ears, noses, urethras and bile ducts  Most human organs get their form from an internal scaffolding of collagen and other proteins. Scientists struggled for years to find a replacement material that was strong and flexible and yet wouldn’t be rejected by the bodyEventually, they homed in on a couple of high-tech materials made from plant fibers, resins and other substances. Dr. Seifalian said he uses a material that is modeled on the honeycomb structure of a butterfly’s wing. The material, a so-called nanocomposite, is resistant to infectious bacteria and has pores that are the right size to hold cells.  “The material has to be accepted by the body, but it also has to be easy to manipulate into different shapes, different strengths,” said Dr. Seifalian.

The nose in the jar was closely modeled on the nose of a 53-year-old Briton. With the help of imaging scans and a glass mold designed by an artist, researchers first fabricated a replica of the original nose. The patient was asked if he wanted a slight deviation in his septum to be straightened out, but he turned down the offer, according to Dr. Seifalian.  The researchers poured the material into the artist’s mold. They added salt and sugar. That created holes in the material and gave it a spongy, porous feel, just like the real thing.  The key to all the lab-built organs are stem cells, found in human bone marrow, fat and elsewhere. Stem cells can be transformed into other tissues of the body, making them the basic building blocks for any organ.

In the case of the nose, stem cells extracted from the patient’s fat tissue were added to the artist’s mold, along with chemicals that control cell development. The stem cells sat inside the pores of the lab-made organ and gradually differentiated into cells that make cartilage.  However, the nose was missing a crucial piece: skin.  This posed a substantial hurdle. No one has made natural human skin from scratch. Dr. Seifalian’s idea: to implant the nose under the skin of the patient’s forehead in the hope that skin tissue there would automatically sheath the nose.

 nose-growing-on-arm-omg

But the patient objected, and for good reason: The implanted nose would have to sit inside his forehead for weeks or even months. In the end, Dr. Seifalian chose a less obtrusive approach. The bio-engineered nose was implanted under the patient’s forearm.  The team now is using imaging equipment to keep tabs on whether the necessary blood vessels, skin and cartilage are forming in the right way. “We’ll have to also make sure there’s no infection,” Dr. Seifalian said in late November, on the day of the patient’s surgery.  If the skin graft works, surgeons will remove the nose from the arm and attach it to the patient’s face. Dr. Seifalian will then apply the right chemicals to convert the man’s stem cells into epithelial cells, a common type of tissue found in the nose and in the lining of other organs. The epithelial cells will be inserted into the nose.  As a final step, surgeons will connect blood vessels from the face to the site of the new nose to provide a steady flow of nourishment for the growing cells. “The whole process could take six months,” said Dr. Seifalian. He estimates the cost of making the nose in the lab is about $40,000, but the patient isn’t being charged because the doctors and scientists are either donating their time or working on this as part of their research.

Dr. Seifalian said the new nose could restore some sense of smell to the patient, but its main benefit will be cosmetic. He held up a jar full of early-stage lab-made noses, and another filled with early-stage ears.

“We’re actually in the process of making a synthetic face,” he said. From a cosmetic point of view, “if you can make the ear and the nose, there’s not much left.”  Regenerating a nose would be a striking achievement; creating a complex organ like the heart would be historic. A team led by Spain’s Dr. Aviles is trying to get there first.

Dr. Aviles trained as a cardiologist but became frustrated with the difficulty of treating patients with advanced heart disease. The only option for the worst cases was a heart transplant, and there was a shortage of hearts. Spain has the highest donor rate in the world, yet Dr. Aviles said that only about 10% of patients who need a heart transplant get one.

He was approached in 2009 by a U.S. scientist, Doris Taylor, who had already grown a beating rat heart in the lab while at the University of Minnesota. Instead of using a man-made scaffold, Dr. Taylor had used the scaffolding from an actual rat heart as the starting point. She believed the same technique was crucial for making a working human heart. She was attracted to Spain because the higher donor rate meant that more hearts unsuitable for transplant could be used for experiments.

Dr. Aviles and about 10 colleagues began their human-heart experiments crammed into a small storage room at the hospital. In 2010, a sparkling new lab opened. It has two large freezers with human cells and human hearts, and a dozen stainless steel sinks containing pig hearts immersed in a colorless liquid.  Growing a heart is much harder than, say, growing a windpipe, because the heart is so big and has several types of cells, including those that beat, those that form blood vessels, and those that help conduct electrical signals. For a long time, scientists didn’t know how to make all the cells grow in the right place and in the right order.

The problem had been cracked by Dr. Taylor. She said that when human stem cells were put into a heart scaffold in 2010, they seemed to know just where to go. “They organized themselves in a way I didn’t believe,” said Dr. Taylor, who now works at the Texas Heart Institute but makes regular visits to Madrid to help with the experiments. “It’s amazing that the [scaffold] can be as instructional as it is. Maybe we don’t need to micromanage every aspect of this.”

Dr. Aviles said he hopes to have a working, lab-made version ready in five or six years, but the regulatory and safety hurdles for putting such an organ in a patient will be high. The most realistic scenario, he said, is that “in about 10 years” his lab will be transplanting heart parts.

He and his team already have grown early-stage valves and patches that could be used some day to repair tissue damaged by heart attack..  The Madrid lab has made only baby steps toward its grand plan to grow a human heart using the same techniques that Dr. Taylor pioneered with a rat heart.

“We opened the door and showed it was possible,” she said. “This is no longer science-fiction. It’s becoming science.”

A version of this article appeared March 22, 2013, on page A1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Science Fiction Comes Alive As Researchers Grow Organs in Lab.

BONE REPAIR THROUGH STEM CELLS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on February 10, 2013 at 8:41 am

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The use of bone stem cells combined with a degradable rigid material that inserts into broken bones and encourages real bone to re-grow has been developed at the Universities of Edinburgh and Southampton.

Researchers have developed the material with a honeycomb scaffold structure that allows blood to flow through it, enabling stem cells from the patient’s bone marrow to attach to the material and grow new bone. Over time, the plastic slowly degrades as the implant is replaced by newly grown bone.  Scientists developed the material by blending three types of plastics. They used a pioneering technique to blend and test hundreds of combinations of plastics, to identify a blend that was robust, lightweight, and able to support bone stem cells. Successful results have been shown in the lab and in animal testing with the focus now moving towards human clinical evaluation.

“Fractures and bone loss due to trauma or disease are a significant clinical and socioeconomic problem.  This collaboration between chemistry and medicine has identified unique candidate materials that support human bone stem cell growth and allow bone formation. The collaborative strategy offers significant therapeutic implications.  We were able to make and look at a hundreds of candidate materials and rapidly whittle these down to one which is strong enough to replace bone and is also a suitable surface upon which to grow new bone.” said Professor Mark Bradley, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Chemistry

“We are confident that this material could soon be helping to improve the quality of life for patients with severe bone injuries, and will help maintain the health of an aging population.”

The study, published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/

Two More Patients HIV-Free After Bone Marrow Transplants – ABC News

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on September 12, 2012 at 5:08 pm

Read the story on the first man to recover from HIV Positive with a stem cell transplant who is now symptom free for 5 years! http://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2010/12/10/man-appears-free-of-hiv-after-stem-cell-transplant-for-3-years/

And with these 2 more men now HIV free, perhaps the dream of an HIV Free Generation is one step closer to reality!

Two More Patients HIV-Free After Bone Marrow Transplants

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston have discovered that, following bone marrow transplants, two men no longer have detectable HIV in their blood cells.

The finding is significant because it suggests that by giving these patients transplants while they were on anti-retroviral therapy, they may have been cured of the AIDS-causing virus.

“We expected HIV to vanish from the patients’ plasma, but it is surprising that we can’t find any traces of HIV in their cells,” said Dr. Timothy Henrich, one of the researchers studying the two men. “It suggests that under the cover of anti-retroviral therapy, the cells that repopulated the patient’s immune system appear to be protected from becoming re-infected with HIV.”…


Two More Patients HIV-Free After Bone Marrow Transplants – ABC News
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STEM CELLS – MAGIC OR SCIENCE?

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 26, 2012 at 11:28 am

 

A friend asked:

“I would like nothing more than to beleive adult stem cell working for different diseases, however I don’t. How can you take a sick cell and replant it and it becomes healthy.”

—————————————————————————

My answer:

HIGH TURNOVER RATE
This is not magic, it is biological fact. Let’s start with your body. “Just like us, cells grow old and die. When old cells die, new ones replace them. For example, a blood cell in our body lives for about 120 days. Another example is our skin cells. We shed our skin cells about every 35 days.” That’s the outer layer which is why tattoos fade over time and why tattoos go deep into the lower levels of skin.

I’M DYING! YES, WE ALL ARE…
So our cells are in a constant state of “getting older” or “getting sick” or moving towards “impaired function.” I’m dying says the soldier with the sucking chest wound. Yes, we all are, says his philosopher friend. And we are indeed. “He not busy being born is busy dying.” says Bob Dylan. Perhaps this is too philosophical but the point is this: our body and every one of the 5-50 trillion cells is either getting older and weaker and dying or is currently being born or repaired. It’s a dynamic entity, this shell we reside in and it is constantly changing.

GETTING DOWN WITH THE SICKNESS
If you have too many cells with impaired function, especially in a specific area, which are damaged, necrotic, not getting enough nutrients, minerals etc and are getting exposure to too many toxins, inflammation, infections, etc which it can not eliminate, then something will go wrong and you will get sick with the capital ‘S’ and it is time to call in the workers to fix you up.

BOB THE BUILDER HAS SOME COMPETITION
Stem cells are the body’s construction workers. They do both renovations and they do ground up construction. Renovations amount to taking dead tissue and cells – necrotic – and re-energizing them so they come back to life (no zombie jokes please). This can be seen in hundreds of heart studies and trials and thousands of congestive heart failure patients where necrotic heart tissue implanted with stem cells was found to be living and beating a few weeks later. Ground up construction is where they set up shop on a blank field and build something new. This can be seen when stem cells create mini bypasses where stents were implanted. They are actually smart enough to know the “stent area” is a dangerous heavy traffic area and even if the stent is working, they will create offramps and onramps around the stent or bypasses with capillaries. Pretty cool huh?

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT
Not magic, just plain old science and if your body was able to produce enough stem cells to run to the heart, it could do it by itself. In fact, it is trying, desperately to do exactly that but the body in congestive heart failure is like a single mother with 6 kids, 3 jobs and 2 dogs standing on one foot and juggling chain saws. She just can’t do it all, she is stretched to the limits of her endurance, something has to give…and it does. So while your body is sending stem cells to the heart, and the feet and the pancreas, liver, kidney, brain, endocrine and lymphatic and circulatory system infrastructure, RIGHT NOW, to renovate and build new cells and tissues, it is not sending ENOUGH and the fact that our single mom smokes and lives near a factory and does other people’s laundries, exposing herself to multiple chemical toxins, doesn’t sleep much, can only afford McD’s and is highly stressed, etc etc just taxes her body all the more.

RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW
So YOU have stem cells in YOUR body RIGHT NOW which are running around, differentiating into different cell types and healing you. All the time. So while our bodies are in a constant state of degradation, our stem cells are constantly fighting that degradation.

WANT THE SCIENCE?
If you would like trials and studies to back this up there are about 2,600 at last count and I can refer you to some that address a specific condition.

 

Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 20, 2012 at 11:14 pm
Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

Posted: June  18, 2012 by Sherri McGinnis Gonzalez

Chicagoan Ieshea Thomas is the first Midwest patient to receive a successful stem cell transplant to cure her sickle cell disease without chemotherapy in preparation for the transplant. University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System physicians performed the procedure using medication to suppress her immune system and one small dose of total body radiation right before the transplant.The transplant technique is relatively uncommon and is a much more tolerable treatment for patients with aggressive sickle cell disease who often have underlying organ disease and other complications, says Dr. Damiano Rondelli, professor of medicine at UIC, who performed Thomas’s transplant.

The procedure initially allows a patient’s own bone marrow to coexist with that of the donor. Since the patient’s bone marrow is not completely destroyed by chemotherapy or radiation prior to transplant, part of the immune defense survives, lessening the risk of infection. The goal is for the transplanted stem cells to gradually take over the bone marrow’s role to produce red blood cells — normal, healthy ones…

FDA APPROVES FIRST CORD BLOOD PRODUCT

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 6, 2012 at 2:06 am

Finally some good news!  I guess its true, even monkeys fall out of trees sometimes!

http://mymommymanual.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/cord-blood-300x225.png

FDA APPROVES FIRST CORD BLOOD PRODUCT

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved HEMACORD, the first licensed hematopoietic progenitor cells-cord (HPC-C) cell therapy.

HEMACORD is indicated for use in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedures in patients with disorders affecting the hematopoietic (blood forming) system. For example, cord blood transplants have been used to treat patients with certain blood cancers and some inherited metabolic and immune system disorders.

“The use of cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell therapy offers potentially life-saving treatment options for patients with these types of disorders,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., director, FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

HEMACORD contains hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from human cord blood. Cord blood is one of three sources of HPCs used in transplants; the other two are bone marrow and peripheral blood..

Read more: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm279575.htm.

Court won’t reconsider bone marrow payments ruling

In BUSINESS OF STEM CELLS on March 31, 2012 at 3:38 am

Previously, you could not compensate someone for a bone marrow donation“donating bone marrow was classified the same as donating a kidney or any other organ, and payments were forbidden, punished by jail time.”

Now, bone marrow donation is so simple, it no longer resembles organ donation“the process of donating bone marrow [is] nearly identical to giving blood plasma and doesn’t amount to an organ transplant.”

So, you can get paid for a bone marrow donation -“bone marrow donors [can] be paid for their donations like blood donors.”

Many believe this is a very positive move and will encourage more donations.

bone marrow is FULL of stem cells :)

http://www.topnews.in/health/files/bone-marrow.jpg

Court won’t reconsider bone marrow payments ruling

Posted: 6:48pm on Mar 27, 2012; Modified: 9:27pm on Mar 27, 2012

A federal appeals court on Tuesday declined to reconsider a ruling that allows bone marrow donors to be paid for their donations like blood donors.

In December, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals shook up the organ transplant community when it overturned the criminality of paying bone marrow donors. Previously, donating bone marrow was classified the same as donating a kidney or any other organ, and payments were forbidden, punished by jail time.

But the court said a technological breakthrough makes the process of donating bone marrow nearly identical to giving blood plasma and doesn’t amount to an organ transplant.

On Tuesday, the 9th Circuit declined the Obama administration’s request to reconsider the ruling. Several organizations and activisits in the organ-donation community have urged the administration to fight the ruling.

The administration now has 90 days to petition the U.S. Supreme Court.

Department of Justice spokesman Charles Miller said the administration is reviewing its options.

The nonprofit patient advocacy group Institute for Justice called the original ruling a “major national shift in bone marrow donation policy” and said payments will encourage more donations.

SAN FRANCISCO: Court won’t reconsider bone marrow payments ruling | Health | Macon.com.

 

 

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