DAVID GRANOVSKY

Posts Tagged ‘BLOOD’

FDA-Regulated Study of Cord Blood Stem Cells to Treat Acquired Hearing Loss Launches

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 17, 2014 at 9:20 am

hearing loss

PR Newswire

SAN BRUNO, Calif., Jan. 16, 2014

Signals Potential of Newborn Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine for Common Disorders

SAN BRUNO, Calif., Jan. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Cord Blood Registry® (CBR®), the world’s largest and most experienced newborn stem cell company, announces the start of a U.S. Food and Drug (FDA)-regulated study being conducted at Florida Hospital for Children in Orlando to investigate the use of a child’s stem cells from their own stored umbilical cord blood as a treatment for acquired sensorineural hearing loss.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20131216/DC33657LOGO-a)

In the United States, approximately 15 percent of children suffer from low or high-frequency hearing loss.[i] The most common type of hearing loss, especially at high frequencies, is sensorineural. Acquired sensorineural hearing loss results from damage to hair cells in the inner ear (cochlea) and can be caused by illness, medication, noise exposure, birth injury, or head trauma. A child’s ability to hear affects the development of language skills, and hearing impairments can lead to poor academic and social development.[ii]

The groundbreaking phase 1 study has a primary objective of determining the safety of using cord blood stem cells in a select pediatric patient population while also assessing whether this approach to treatment improves inner ear function, speech, and language development. Researchers will follow 10 children, ranging in age from 6 weeks to 6 years, who have been diagnosed with acquired hearing loss for less than 18 months and who have their own cord blood unit processed and stored under CBR’s strict quality controls. Children with a known genetic cause of deafness are ineligible for study participation. Patients will receive one intravenous infusion of their own umbilical cord blood stem cells. All patients will return for follow-up at 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post-treatment.

The trial, supported by CBR, follows promising evidence from preclinical studies suggesting that the infusion of human umbilical cord stem cells may help repair damaged cells in the inner ear in ways that could lead to hearing improvement.[iii]

“As more children survive premature birth, we are observing increasing numbers of very young children with significant acquired hearing loss, and currently there are no therapies available for reversing that damage,” says Linda Baumgartner M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS cert. AVT, the trial’s Speech and Language Pathologist and hearing loss expert.  James Baumgartner, MD, Surgical Director of Florida Hospital for Children’s Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Center and the study’s principal investigator notes that “presently, the only treatment options for acquired sensorineural hearing loss are hearing aids or cochlear implants, neither of which actually repairs the damage. Using cord blood stem cells to help trigger the body’s own repair mechanisms could provide a non-invasive therapeutic option that does not exist today.”

During the last 25 years, cord blood stem cells have been used in more than 30,000 transplants performed worldwide for the treatment of nearly 80 serious diseases and disorders in both adults and children. The evolution of stem cell therapies has paved the way for further research being conducted through FDA-regulated clinical trials to uncover their potential in regenerative medicine applications.

“Cord Blood Registry continues to lead the industry in evaluating the potential of newborn stem cells in neurological damage, supporting FDA-regulated clinical trials in autism, cerebral palsy, pediatric stroke, traumatic brain injury, and now hearing loss,” underscores Heather Brown, Vice President of Scientific & Medical Affairs at CBR. “We are excited to learn from the outcomes of this particular study and from future studies that may evaluate broader populations affected by hearing loss or other neurological impairments for which there are limited treatment options today,” adds Brown.

For further details regarding the study, visit www.cordblood.com/hearingloss

About Cord Blood Registry

Cord Blood Registry® (CBR®) is the world’s largest newborn stem cell company. Founded in 1992, CBR is entrusted by parents with storing more than 500,000 cord blood and cord tissue units. CBR is dedicated to advancing the clinical application of newborn stem cells by partnering with leading research institutions to establish FDA-regulated clinical trials requiring CBR processed cord blood for conditions that have no cure today. For more information, visit www.cordblood.com

Florida Hospital for Children
Florida Hospital for Children is a full-service facility served by more than 130 pediatric specialists and a highly trained pediatric team of more than 1,000 caregivers and staff. This unique children’s hospital provides patients with private, family-centered pediatric rooms, a dedicated pediatric emergency department and an Advanced Center for Pediatric Surgery. The Walt Disney Pavilion at Florida Hospital for Children, in Orlando, delivers a complete range of pediatric health and research services for younger patients including advanced surgery, oncology, neurosurgery, cardiology and transplant services, full-service pediatrics, and an innovative health and obesity platform. The 200-pediatric bed facility officially opened in March 2011, but Florida Hospital has been caring for children for more than 100 years.

Contact Information:
Brian Plummer
Manager, Public Relations & Corporate Communications
(650) 635-1420 | EXT. 255
BPlummer@cordblood.com

[i] Niskar, AS, et al. Prevalence of hearing loss among children 6 to 19 years of age: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. JAMA.1998;279:1071-1075.

[ii] Tierney, CD, et al. Development of children who have hearing impairment. Pediatr Rev 29, e72-73; discussion e73 (2008)

[iii] Revoltella RP, Papini S, Rosellini A, et al. Cochlear repair by transplantation of human cord blood CD133+ cells to nod-scid mice made deaf with kanamycin and noise. Cell Transplant.2008;17(6):665-678.

SOURCE Cord Blood Registry

SCIENCE FICTION COMES ALIVE WITH ORGANS GROWN IN A LAB

In SCIENCE & STEM CELLS, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on March 26, 2013 at 9:00 am

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Building a complex human organ in the lab is no longer a dream of science fiction. At London’s Royal Free Hospital, a team of 30 scientists is manufacturing a variety of body parts, including windpipes, noses and ears. WSJ’s Gautam Naik reports. Photo: Gareth Phillips

Science Fiction Comes Alive as Researchers Grow Organs in Lab

MADRID—Reaching into a stainless steel tray, Francisco Fernandez-Aviles lifted up a gray, rubbery mass the size of a fat fist.  It was a human cadaver heart that had been bathed in industrial detergents until its original cells had been washed away and all that was left was what scientists call the scaffold.  Next, said Dr. Aviles, “We need to make the heart come alive.”

Inside a warren of rooms buried in the basement of Gregorio Marañón hospital here, Dr. Aviles and his team are at the sharpest edge of the bioengineering revolution that has turned the science-fiction dream of building replacement parts for the human body into a reality.  Since a laboratory in North Carolina made a bladder in 1996, scientists have built increasingly more complex organs. There have been five windpipe replacements so far. A London researcher, Alex Seifalian, has transplanted lab-grown tear ducts and an artery into patients. He has made an artificial nose he expects to transplant later this year in a man who lost his nose to skin cancer.

“The work has been extraordinarily pioneering,” said Sir Roy Calne, an 82-year-old British surgeon who figured out in the 1950s how to use drugs to prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs.

Now, with the quest to build a heart, researchers are tackling the most complex organ yet. The payoff could be huge, both medically and financially, because so many people around the world are afflicted with heart disease. Researchers see a multi billion dollar market developing for heart parts that could repair diseased hearts and clogged arteries.

In additional to the artificial nose, Dr. Seifalian is making cardiovascular body parts. He sees a time when scientists would grow the structures needed for artery bypass procedures instead of taking a vein from another part the body. As part of a clinical trial, Dr. Seifalian plans to transplant a bio-engineered coronary artery into a person later this year. His employer, University College London, has designated a person to oversee any future commercialization of it and other man-made organs.

The development of lab-built body parts is being spurred by a shortage of organ donors amid rising demand for transplants. Also, unlike patients getting transplants, recipients of lab-built organs won’t have to take powerful anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. That’s because the bio-engineered organs are built with the patients’ own cells.

Until the late 1980s, few scientists believed it would be possible to make human organs because it was a struggle to grow human cells in the laboratory. The task became easier once scientists figured out the chemicals—known as growth factors—that the body itself uses to promote cellular growth.

Scientists started out growing simple organs. In 1999, Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., implanted lab-grown bladders into the first of several children with severely dysfunctional bladders. The organs have continued to function well for several years. Dr. Atala’s team now is trying to grow a whole range of bio-engineered parts, from simple blood vessels to human livers.

Some of the most complex work is under way at Dr. Seifalian’s laboratory.   A 56-year-old native of Iran, Dr. Seifalian started out as a nuclear physicist, and became interested in medical uses of nuclear technology. That ultimately led him to bioengineering.  In 2011, Dr. Seifalian made a windpipe from a patient’s cells. It was used to replace the cancerous windpipe of the patient, saving his life, his surgeon has said.

Dr. Seifalian and 30 scientists now seek to build a larynx, ears, noses, urethras and bile ducts  Most human organs get their form from an internal scaffolding of collagen and other proteins. Scientists struggled for years to find a replacement material that was strong and flexible and yet wouldn’t be rejected by the bodyEventually, they homed in on a couple of high-tech materials made from plant fibers, resins and other substances. Dr. Seifalian said he uses a material that is modeled on the honeycomb structure of a butterfly’s wing. The material, a so-called nanocomposite, is resistant to infectious bacteria and has pores that are the right size to hold cells.  “The material has to be accepted by the body, but it also has to be easy to manipulate into different shapes, different strengths,” said Dr. Seifalian.

The nose in the jar was closely modeled on the nose of a 53-year-old Briton. With the help of imaging scans and a glass mold designed by an artist, researchers first fabricated a replica of the original nose. The patient was asked if he wanted a slight deviation in his septum to be straightened out, but he turned down the offer, according to Dr. Seifalian.  The researchers poured the material into the artist’s mold. They added salt and sugar. That created holes in the material and gave it a spongy, porous feel, just like the real thing.  The key to all the lab-built organs are stem cells, found in human bone marrow, fat and elsewhere. Stem cells can be transformed into other tissues of the body, making them the basic building blocks for any organ.

In the case of the nose, stem cells extracted from the patient’s fat tissue were added to the artist’s mold, along with chemicals that control cell development. The stem cells sat inside the pores of the lab-made organ and gradually differentiated into cells that make cartilage.  However, the nose was missing a crucial piece: skin.  This posed a substantial hurdle. No one has made natural human skin from scratch. Dr. Seifalian’s idea: to implant the nose under the skin of the patient’s forehead in the hope that skin tissue there would automatically sheath the nose.

 nose-growing-on-arm-omg

But the patient objected, and for good reason: The implanted nose would have to sit inside his forehead for weeks or even months. In the end, Dr. Seifalian chose a less obtrusive approach. The bio-engineered nose was implanted under the patient’s forearm.  The team now is using imaging equipment to keep tabs on whether the necessary blood vessels, skin and cartilage are forming in the right way. “We’ll have to also make sure there’s no infection,” Dr. Seifalian said in late November, on the day of the patient’s surgery.  If the skin graft works, surgeons will remove the nose from the arm and attach it to the patient’s face. Dr. Seifalian will then apply the right chemicals to convert the man’s stem cells into epithelial cells, a common type of tissue found in the nose and in the lining of other organs. The epithelial cells will be inserted into the nose.  As a final step, surgeons will connect blood vessels from the face to the site of the new nose to provide a steady flow of nourishment for the growing cells. “The whole process could take six months,” said Dr. Seifalian. He estimates the cost of making the nose in the lab is about $40,000, but the patient isn’t being charged because the doctors and scientists are either donating their time or working on this as part of their research.

Dr. Seifalian said the new nose could restore some sense of smell to the patient, but its main benefit will be cosmetic. He held up a jar full of early-stage lab-made noses, and another filled with early-stage ears.

“We’re actually in the process of making a synthetic face,” he said. From a cosmetic point of view, “if you can make the ear and the nose, there’s not much left.”  Regenerating a nose would be a striking achievement; creating a complex organ like the heart would be historic. A team led by Spain’s Dr. Aviles is trying to get there first.

Dr. Aviles trained as a cardiologist but became frustrated with the difficulty of treating patients with advanced heart disease. The only option for the worst cases was a heart transplant, and there was a shortage of hearts. Spain has the highest donor rate in the world, yet Dr. Aviles said that only about 10% of patients who need a heart transplant get one.

He was approached in 2009 by a U.S. scientist, Doris Taylor, who had already grown a beating rat heart in the lab while at the University of Minnesota. Instead of using a man-made scaffold, Dr. Taylor had used the scaffolding from an actual rat heart as the starting point. She believed the same technique was crucial for making a working human heart. She was attracted to Spain because the higher donor rate meant that more hearts unsuitable for transplant could be used for experiments.

Dr. Aviles and about 10 colleagues began their human-heart experiments crammed into a small storage room at the hospital. In 2010, a sparkling new lab opened. It has two large freezers with human cells and human hearts, and a dozen stainless steel sinks containing pig hearts immersed in a colorless liquid.  Growing a heart is much harder than, say, growing a windpipe, because the heart is so big and has several types of cells, including those that beat, those that form blood vessels, and those that help conduct electrical signals. For a long time, scientists didn’t know how to make all the cells grow in the right place and in the right order.

The problem had been cracked by Dr. Taylor. She said that when human stem cells were put into a heart scaffold in 2010, they seemed to know just where to go. “They organized themselves in a way I didn’t believe,” said Dr. Taylor, who now works at the Texas Heart Institute but makes regular visits to Madrid to help with the experiments. “It’s amazing that the [scaffold] can be as instructional as it is. Maybe we don’t need to micromanage every aspect of this.”

Dr. Aviles said he hopes to have a working, lab-made version ready in five or six years, but the regulatory and safety hurdles for putting such an organ in a patient will be high. The most realistic scenario, he said, is that “in about 10 years” his lab will be transplanting heart parts.

He and his team already have grown early-stage valves and patches that could be used some day to repair tissue damaged by heart attack..  The Madrid lab has made only baby steps toward its grand plan to grow a human heart using the same techniques that Dr. Taylor pioneered with a rat heart.

“We opened the door and showed it was possible,” she said. “This is no longer science-fiction. It’s becoming science.”

A version of this article appeared March 22, 2013, on page A1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Science Fiction Comes Alive As Researchers Grow Organs in Lab.

STEM CELLS FOR SCLERODERMA

In ALL ARTICLES, STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on January 25, 2013 at 9:05 am

One day, people will use stem cell treatments as the first course of action instead of the last and save themselves a lot of money, time and suffering.  We can only hope! – DG

“I need money for my stem cell transplant. That’s kind of my last option. I’ve tried everything else.” – Cat David

Cat Davis

Cat Davis receives stem cell transplant

Published On: Jan 24 2013 04:43:05 AM PST  Updated On: Jan 24 2013 04:40:32 PM PST

SPOKANE, Wash. -

It’s an incredible day of victory for a Spokane woman, who thought she may not live to see it. Cat Davis, whose story we’ve been following since last fall, has now received the stem-cell transplant that will likely save her life.

Four months ago, it looked like today would never come. Four months ago, Cat sat in her North Spokane living room and said, “I need money for my stem cell transplant. That’s kind of my last option. I’ve tried everything else.”

Scleroderma had taken so much away from the vibrant woman in her mid-20′s. Her skin and organs have been hardening for years, her esophagus was so narrowed, she couldn’t eat solid foods. Every day was a race against the clock. If the disease goes too far in her heart and lungs, there’s nothing they can do. Time and money were against her. So were the odds.

Spokane rallied. Through coffee and pizza and fun runs and ice cream, the community raised more than $170,000 to help pay for the transplant and other medical expenses. They were touched by her smile and positive attitude. Her story stretched around the world.

Thursday morning in a hospital room in Chicago, Cat got that stem-cell transplant, marking the first day of the rest of her life.

“Transplant is complete! Cat has 14.2 million brand new baby cells circulating in her blood stream It all went as planned.” Cat’s mom Sally emailed those words to Cat’s friends and family Thursday morning. The past few days have been hell for Cat, as chemotherapy killed off her immune system and made her terribly sick. Cat’s mom counted down the days leading to transplant day as “minus one” and “minus two” and so forth.

Thursday, a new day.

“A long battle lies ahead,” Sally wrote. “We will win the victory. This is Day 0. From now on we count the days as pluses. No more minuses.”

Now, the recovery. Cat will spend the next 10 days or so in Chicago, recovering. Then, it’s back to Spokane for a long road to full strength. Cat and her family feel the love and prayers all the way from Spokane. Cat’s family and friends decorated her room with purple hearts, made at Ben and Jerry’s in Spokane during a fundraising drive last year.

“We have saved them all this time for this day,” Sally Davis wrote. “They are precious. One of my favorite says, “Fight like a girl!”

She’s been fighting long enough. Now, it’s time for Cat to rest and get well. And, know that everyone in Spokane is behind her.

Her journey so far has touched so many lives. Now, it’s time to save her own.

FIGHTING LUNG DISEASE IN THE TINIEST PATIENTS

In ALL ARTICLES, SCIENCE & STEM CELLS on January 6, 2013 at 4:54 pm

Pbroncho

  1. Stem cells called mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from a human umbilical cord (not the blood) have a protective effect on the lungs when injected into the lungs as they were put on oxygen.
  2. MSCs had a reparative effect when injected two weeks after being on oxygen.
  3. When conditioned media — a cell-free substance produced by MSCs — was administered instead of MSCs, it was found to have the same protective and reparative effects as the stem cells.
  4. When examined after six months (the equivalent of 40 human years), treated animals had better exercise performance and persistent benefit in lung structure.
  5. MSCs did not adversely affect the long-term health of normal rats. One of the concerns about stem cells is that by promoting cell growth, they may cause cancerous growth. To address this question, Dr. Thébaud gave MSCs to a control group that was not treated with oxygen. When examined after six months, these animals were normal and healthy.
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
Five Big Strides to Fight Lung Disease in the Tiniest Patients

Dec. 4, 2012 — For Ottawa scientist and neonatologist Dr. Bernard Thébaud, even a major paper that answers five significant questions still doesn’t seem quite enough in his determined path to get his laboratory breakthrough into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Dr. Thébaud’s proposed therapy would use stem cells from umbilical cords to treat a disease previously thought to be untreatable — bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or BPD.


“BPD is a lung disease described 45 years ago in which we have made zero progress. And now, with these cord-derived stem cells there is a true potential for a major breakthrough,” says Dr. Thébaud, a senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and CHEO Research Institute, a neonatologist at CHEO and The Ottawa Hospital, and a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa.

“I am confident that we have the talent and the tools here at CHEO and OHRI to find a treatment for BPD. These findings published today are helping us get there,” continues Thébaud.

BPD affects approximately 10,000 very premature newborns in Canada and the U.S. every year. The lungs of these infants are not developed enough to sustain them, so they must receive oxygen through a breathing machine. However, this combination of mechanical ventilation and oxygen damages the lungs and stops their development. In addition, longer stays in the NICU for these extremely premature babies affect the normal development of other parts of the body, including the retina, the kidneys and the brain.

Today in the journal Thorax, Dr. Thébaud’s team provides significant findings in experiments with newborn rats given oxygen. The lung development of a newborn rat mimics that of a premature baby born at 24 weeks. The five major findings reported in Thorax are:

  1. Stem cells called mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from a human umbilical cord (not the blood) have a protective effect on the lungs when injected into the lungs as they were put on oxygen.
  2. MSCs had a reparative effect when injected two weeks after being on oxygen.
  3. When conditioned media — a cell-free substance produced by MSCs — was administered instead of MSCs, it was found to have the same protective and reparative effects as the stem cells.
  4. When examined after six months (the equivalent of 40 human years), treated animals had better exercise performance and persistent benefit in lung structure.
  5. MSCs did not adversely affect the long-term health of normal rats. One of the concerns about stem cells is that by promoting cell growth, they may cause cancerous growth. To address this question, Dr. Thébaud gave MSCs to a control group that was not treated with oxygen. When examined after six months, these animals were normal and healthy.

Within two years, Dr. Thébaud wants to be talking about a pilot study with 20 human patients showing that this stem-cell therapy is feasible and safe, and in four years he wants to embark on a randomized control trial. These are all steps in his profound desire to help the babies he sees in the NICU with BPD, and he is confident a treatment will be developed.

“It’s going to happen here in Ottawa, but for babies worldwide,” says Dr. Thébaud.

STEM CELLS, AUTISM and stuff

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on August 29, 2012 at 3:48 pm

http://www.nh-di.org/nh/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/clarifications290.jpg

First a disclaimer.  I am a stem cell writer/author/advocate.  While you may think this means I have an agenda (I do, to help patients get better), I am very careful to site real data sources for my info.  My “opinions” are based on science.  [For example, I am uninterested in embryonic stem cells because they will not produce treatments for decades, they cause cysts and tumors and they require immunosuppressive drugs.]

Many of my sources are from my own blog so if you find this too self-referential or if you find any data lacking on a specific subject, please ask and I will tell you where I got my original data from.  Please feel free to comment on my blog.  It is an open forum on the benefits of adult stem cell treatments.  I welcome all intelligent and rational communication and my site is not monetized so I make no money if you go there, comment or otherwise.

Ok, there’s a lot of misinformation out there. Let’s clear it up.

ADULT STEM CELLS or ASC – https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/stem-cells-for-newbies/
SOURCE/DERIVED FROM•comes from blood, umbilical cords, bone marrow, placenta fat tissue, muscle, nasal neurological, breast milk, menstruation, dental pulp, lungs, eyes, brain and many more
PURPOSE IN BODY•they are the body’s natural healing cells
OBSTACLES+SIDE EFFECTS•virtually zero side negative effects, many positive side effects
TREATMENT HISTORY•used in bone marrow transplants to treat cancer for 40 years, can currently treat 130+ diseases safely and effectively (CP, MS, Autism, Diabetes, CHF, PAD, etc)

For example, blood derived stem cells are a very valid source of stem cells and many treatment centers and clinical trials using blood derived stem cells for years with extremely positive results.  The first stem cell treatment center in the world generated significant therapeutic benefit for over 62% of their congestive heart failure patients.  These are called no option CHF patients because their only recourse is a heart transplant.  62% of “no option” CHF patients derived significant therapuetic benefit, sometimes doubling their Ejection Fractions (amount of blood pumped out by the heart).  But this is anecdotal, let’s talk data.

What data is their showing that stem cell treatments work?
Anecdotal and 10′s of thousands of patients treated aside…as of late 2009, according to the National Institutes of Health, there were and are ~2600 stem cell clinical trials around the world – http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/
Of those ~2600, there are ~2591 mentions of adult stem cells.
Of those ~2591, about half of them (~1300) are actual adult stem cell clinical trials.

Currently, as of today, there are 3,989 clinical trials under keyword search “stem cell” illustrating the safety and efficacy of utilizing stem cells to treat chronic and terminal diseases. Many are from reputable colleges and hospitals around the world, some in the US like Duke U., Northwestern, etc.

How about for Autism? (I apologize, my data has not kept current but as of late 2009)
https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/26/stem-cells-for-autism/
and https://repairstemcell.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/potential-of-stem-cell-treatments-for-autism/

Please also look at the 29,500 scholarly papers submitted on “stem cell” plus “autism” minus embryonic.  These are up to date:
http://scholar.google.com/scholar?as_q=autism&as_epq=stem+cell&as_oq=&as_eq=embryonic&as_occt=any&as_sauthors=&as_publication=&as_ylo=&as_yhi=&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=1%2C39&as_vis=1

I hope this was informative. If I can be of any assistance on specific diseases or questions, please feel free to ask.

STEM CELLS – MAGIC OR SCIENCE?

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on July 26, 2012 at 11:28 am

 

A friend asked:

“I would like nothing more than to beleive adult stem cell working for different diseases, however I don’t. How can you take a sick cell and replant it and it becomes healthy.”

—————————————————————————

My answer:

HIGH TURNOVER RATE
This is not magic, it is biological fact. Let’s start with your body. “Just like us, cells grow old and die. When old cells die, new ones replace them. For example, a blood cell in our body lives for about 120 days. Another example is our skin cells. We shed our skin cells about every 35 days.” That’s the outer layer which is why tattoos fade over time and why tattoos go deep into the lower levels of skin.

I’M DYING! YES, WE ALL ARE…
So our cells are in a constant state of “getting older” or “getting sick” or moving towards “impaired function.” I’m dying says the soldier with the sucking chest wound. Yes, we all are, says his philosopher friend. And we are indeed. “He not busy being born is busy dying.” says Bob Dylan. Perhaps this is too philosophical but the point is this: our body and every one of the 5-50 trillion cells is either getting older and weaker and dying or is currently being born or repaired. It’s a dynamic entity, this shell we reside in and it is constantly changing.

GETTING DOWN WITH THE SICKNESS
If you have too many cells with impaired function, especially in a specific area, which are damaged, necrotic, not getting enough nutrients, minerals etc and are getting exposure to too many toxins, inflammation, infections, etc which it can not eliminate, then something will go wrong and you will get sick with the capital ‘S’ and it is time to call in the workers to fix you up.

BOB THE BUILDER HAS SOME COMPETITION
Stem cells are the body’s construction workers. They do both renovations and they do ground up construction. Renovations amount to taking dead tissue and cells – necrotic – and re-energizing them so they come back to life (no zombie jokes please). This can be seen in hundreds of heart studies and trials and thousands of congestive heart failure patients where necrotic heart tissue implanted with stem cells was found to be living and beating a few weeks later. Ground up construction is where they set up shop on a blank field and build something new. This can be seen when stem cells create mini bypasses where stents were implanted. They are actually smart enough to know the “stent area” is a dangerous heavy traffic area and even if the stent is working, they will create offramps and onramps around the stent or bypasses with capillaries. Pretty cool huh?

YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT
Not magic, just plain old science and if your body was able to produce enough stem cells to run to the heart, it could do it by itself. In fact, it is trying, desperately to do exactly that but the body in congestive heart failure is like a single mother with 6 kids, 3 jobs and 2 dogs standing on one foot and juggling chain saws. She just can’t do it all, she is stretched to the limits of her endurance, something has to give…and it does. So while your body is sending stem cells to the heart, and the feet and the pancreas, liver, kidney, brain, endocrine and lymphatic and circulatory system infrastructure, RIGHT NOW, to renovate and build new cells and tissues, it is not sending ENOUGH and the fact that our single mom smokes and lives near a factory and does other people’s laundries, exposing herself to multiple chemical toxins, doesn’t sleep much, can only afford McD’s and is highly stressed, etc etc just taxes her body all the more.

RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW
So YOU have stem cells in YOUR body RIGHT NOW which are running around, differentiating into different cell types and healing you. All the time. So while our bodies are in a constant state of degradation, our stem cells are constantly fighting that degradation.

WANT THE SCIENCE?
If you would like trials and studies to back this up there are about 2,600 at last count and I can refer you to some that address a specific condition.

 

Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on June 20, 2012 at 11:14 pm
Chicago Woman Cured of Sickle Cell Disease

Posted: June  18, 2012 by Sherri McGinnis Gonzalez

Chicagoan Ieshea Thomas is the first Midwest patient to receive a successful stem cell transplant to cure her sickle cell disease without chemotherapy in preparation for the transplant. University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System physicians performed the procedure using medication to suppress her immune system and one small dose of total body radiation right before the transplant.The transplant technique is relatively uncommon and is a much more tolerable treatment for patients with aggressive sickle cell disease who often have underlying organ disease and other complications, says Dr. Damiano Rondelli, professor of medicine at UIC, who performed Thomas’s transplant.

The procedure initially allows a patient’s own bone marrow to coexist with that of the donor. Since the patient’s bone marrow is not completely destroyed by chemotherapy or radiation prior to transplant, part of the immune defense survives, lessening the risk of infection. The goal is for the transplanted stem cells to gradually take over the bone marrow’s role to produce red blood cells — normal, healthy ones…

NEW STEM CELL FOUND IN THE BRAIN

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 23, 2012 at 10:08 pm

http://www.bio.miami.edu/~cmallery/150/neuro/brain_stem_cells2.jpg

New stem cell found in the brain

Researchers at Lund University have discovered a new stem cell in the adult brain. These cells can proliferate and form several different cell types – most importantly, they can form new brain cells. Now the researchers hope to put the discovery to use to develop methods that can repair diseases and injury to the brain.

Analysing brain tissue from biopsies, the researchers for the first time found stem cells located around small blood vessels in the brain. The cell’s specific function is still unclear, but its plastic properties suggest great potential. A similar cell type has been identified in several other organs where it can promote regeneration of muscle, bone, cartilage and adipose tissue.

In other organs, researchers have shown clear evidence that these types of cells contribute to repair and wound healing. Scientists suggest that the curative properties may also apply to the brain. The next step is to try to control and enhance stem cell self-healing properties with the aim of carrying out therapies targeted to a specific area of the brain.

“Our findings show that the cell capacity is much larger than we originally thought, and that these cells are very versatile,” said Gesine Paul-Visse, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Lund University.

“Most interesting is their ability to form neuronal cells, but they can also be developed for other cell types. The results contribute to better understanding of how brain cell plasticity works and opens up new opportunities to exploit these very features.”

The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, is of interest to a broad spectrum of brain research. Future possible therapeutic targets range from neurodegenerative diseases to stroke.

“We hope that our findings may lead to a new and better understanding of the brain’s own repair mechanisms,” said Dr. Paul-Visse. “Ultimately the goal is to strengthen these mechanisms and develop new treatments that can repair the diseased brain.”

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Link to the study here:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0035577

The study:

Title: The Adult Human Brain Harbors Multipotent Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells Published in: PLoS ONE, 16 April, 2012.

New stem cell found in the brain.

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 13, 2012 at 11:29 am

Twenty-two-years ago, a doctor performed the first umbilical cord transplant for leukemia in the U.S. He used stem cells from a newborn’s umbilical cord and found that they could clean up leukemia cells…Ten years later, in 2000, he learned that mixing cord blood from two different babies was even more effective. Now, he’s taking it a step further.  “What makes this particularly unique is that Derrick is the first person in the world to receive this therapy,” said Wagner.

http://www.mommymdguides.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/QuestionsSecondTrimesterCordBloodBanking2.jpg

gee I hope Texas rules in favor of stem cell treatments today or all of the leukemia patients who follow this guy will be screwed.  they will have to enter a clinical trial in 6 years or so with 30% chance of receiving the cord blood, made into a drug with side effects of course…a trial which excludes anyone with anything else wrong with them (do leukemia patients ever have other sicknesses? probably not.  i seem to remember hearing a lot: “he’s healthy as an ox…except for the leukemia of course). 

so this is good news.  in 10 years or so all you leukemia patients can get a drug…made from cord blood stem cells…with a fraction of the effectiveness…and lots of negative side effects…maybe…

because the truth is, if it’s that rare, then the market sales will not be large enough to pay back the 1/2 billion required to bring the drug to market – so it will never get made anyway…and wait, 10 years?  what’s the life expectancy for  “high-risk form(s) of leukemia which [can] not be cured by chemotherapy?”  never mind readers. skip this article, this doesn’t apply to you.  you’ll all be dead by then.

I REALLY hope Texas rules in favor of stem cell treatments today

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams

VIDEO – http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=6824750

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — He was set to go to college last fall and play baseball, but leukemia changed that. Now, an 18-year-old man is part of the first-of-its-kind treatment that may allow him to fulfill his dream.

Derrick Keller is supposed to be playing baseball for Southwest Minnesota State University, not sitting in a hospital bed at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital. But last summer, just before he was set to leave for college on a baseball scholarship, Derrick began feeling weak.

“For no reason just jogging to centerfield and back, playing catch, my muscles would get extremely tired and I wasn’t feeling myself,” said Keller.

A blood test confirmed his family’s worst fears. Keller had a high-risk form of leukemia which could not be cured by chemotherapy.

“It was unexpected. I would never expect to hear that news. I was normal and it was just weird, I guess,” said Keller.

College was no longer an option. Neither was baseball, which was probably the hardest thing for Keller. But after months in and out of the hospital, his luck was about to change.

“We were able to show that cord blood was a very effective way of curing leukemia,” said Dr. John Wagner, who believes he may be able to cure Keller.

Twenty-two-years ago, Wagner performed the first umbilical cord transplant for leukemia in the U.S. He used stem cells from a newborn’s umbilical cord and found that they could clean up leukemia cells.

Ten years later, in 2000, he learned that mixing cord blood from two different babies was even more effective. Now, with Keller, he’s taking it a step further.

“What makes this particularly unique is that Derrick is the first person in the world to receive this therapy,” said Wagner.

Wagner says Keller would receive an expanded number of stem cells, beyond anything they’ve done before. On Feb. 7, Keller received 73 times more stem cells than the average patient gets.

Wagner’s theory is that the more stem cells Keller receives, the quicker the recovery time and less hospital visits down the road. The surgery was a success and, so far, Keller looks and feels better.

“We think we should be able to cure him of leukemia where, six months from now, you had no idea he ever went through a transplant,” said Wagner.

That would make him a part of history. For Keller, the thought of going to college and being able to play the sport he loves is more thrilling than all of his home runs combined.

“It gets tough sitting here when all my friends are off at college doing that kind of stuff. As soon as I can get back to playing ball and being the normal me again, it will feel great,” said Keller.

Wagner says, if successful, this treatment could be used for both children and adults.

If Keller continues to heal as fast as he is, Wagner sees no reason he can’t go to Southwest Minnesota State in Marshall this fall, where a baseball scholarship is still waiting for him.

Cord Blood Treatment May Fulfill Baseballer’s Dreams « CBS Minnesota.

FDA APPROVES FIRST CORD BLOOD PRODUCT

In STEM CELLS IN THE NEWS on April 6, 2012 at 2:06 am

Finally some good news!  I guess its true, even monkeys fall out of trees sometimes!

http://mymommymanual.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/cord-blood-300x225.png

FDA APPROVES FIRST CORD BLOOD PRODUCT

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved HEMACORD, the first licensed hematopoietic progenitor cells-cord (HPC-C) cell therapy.

HEMACORD is indicated for use in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedures in patients with disorders affecting the hematopoietic (blood forming) system. For example, cord blood transplants have been used to treat patients with certain blood cancers and some inherited metabolic and immune system disorders.

“The use of cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell therapy offers potentially life-saving treatment options for patients with these types of disorders,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., director, FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

HEMACORD contains hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from human cord blood. Cord blood is one of three sources of HPCs used in transplants; the other two are bone marrow and peripheral blood..

Read more: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm279575.htm.

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