DAVID GRANOVSKY

Archive for January 20th, 2012|Daily archive page

CELEB DOCTOR VICKI BELO GETS STEM CELLS

In CELEBRITIES & STEM CELLS on January 20, 2012 at 9:29 am

…if her face looks even more younger and radiates with more glow these days, there’s a more potent elixir for the 55-year-old celebrity doctor, in addition to the daily doses of Hayden that she is taking, to thank for, and it is called stem-cell treatment

Vicki Belo confesses

 

 

THE interview was supposed to last no more than 15 minutes, but Vicki Belo revealed such compelling anecdotes about her lover Hayden Kho and her colorful career that executive producer Giselle Ordinario and director Monti Parungao there and then decided to devote the entire 30-minutes of Cocktales talk show to the celebrity dermatologist.Did you know that Vicki, for instance, had tried to match Hayden with her daughter Cristalle, even setting up a date for the two?

 

But no matter how hard her mother pushed, Cristalle was not smitten by the good-looking doctor, preferring her Lebanese boyfriend instead. As it turned out, it was actually the mother, as we now know, who has the hots on her daughter’s date.

Lest we get ahead of the show, check out the Vicki Belo episode this Sunday, a Christmas Day special, at 9:30 p.m. on AksyonTV. Watch Vicki’s body language when she starts talking about Hayden, especially when asked about the May-December affair.

And if her face looks even more younger and radiates with more glow these days, there’s a more potent elixir for the 55-year-old celebrity doctor, in addition to the daily doses of Hayden that she is taking, to thank for, and it is called stem-cell treatment…

 

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CellNEWS: Bone Marrow-derived Cells Differentiate in the Brain through Mechanisms of Plasticity

In VICTORIES & SUCCESS STORIES on January 20, 2012 at 9:19 am

“This study shows a potential new contribution of bone marrow derived cells following transplantation into the brain, making these cells highly versatile, in their ability to both differentiate into and fuse with endogenous neurons

Bone Marrow-derived Cells Differentiate in the Brain through Mechanisms of Plasticity
Monday, 19 December 2011

Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDCs) have been recognized as a source for transplantation because they can contribute to different cell populations in a variety of organs under both normal and pathological conditions. Many BMDC studies have been aimed at repairing damaged brain tissue or helping to restore lost neural function, with much research focused on BMDC transplants to the cerebellum at the back of the brain. In a recent study, a research team from Spain has found that BMDCs, can contribute to a variety of neural cell types in other areas of the brain as well, including the olfactory bulb, because of a mechanism of “plasticity”.
Their results are published in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (20:8).
“To our knowledge, ours is the first work reporting the BMDC’s contribution to the olfactory neurons,” said study corresponding author Dr. Eduardo Weruaga of the University of Salamanca, Spain.
“We have shown for the first time how BMDCs contribute to the central nervous system in different ways in the same animal depending on the region and cell-specific factors.”
In this study, researchers grafted bone marrow cells into mutant mice suffering from the degeneration of specific neuronal populations at different ages, then compared them to similarly transplanted healthy controls. An increase in the number of BMDCs was found along the lifespan in both experimental groups. Six weeks after transplantation, however, more bone marrow-derived microglial cells were observed in the olfactory bulbs of the test animals where the degeneration of mitral cells was still in progress. The difference was not observed in the cerebellum where cell degeneration had been completed.
“Our findings demonstrate that the degree of neurodegenerative environment can foster the recruitment of neural elements derived from bone marrow,” explained Dr. Weruaga.
“But we also have provided the first evidence that BMDCs can contribute simultaneously to different encephalic areas through different mechanisms of plasticity – cell fusion for Purkinje cells – among the largest and most elaborately dendritic neurons in the human brain – and differentiation for olfactory bulb interneurons.”
Dr. Weruaga noted that they confirmed that BMDCs fuse with Purkinje cells but, unexpectedly, they found that the neurodegenerative environment had no effect on the behavior of the BMDCs.
“Interestingly, the contribution of BMDCs occurred through these two different plasticity mechanisms, which strongly suggests that plasticity mechanisms may be modulated by region and cell type-specific factors,” he said.
“This study shows a potential new contribution of bone marrow derived cells following transplantation into the brain, making these cells highly versatile, in their ability to both differentiate into and fuse with endogenous neurons” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg , coeditor-in-chief of Cell Transplantation and distinguished professor of Neuroscience at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, University of South Florida.
Source: Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Contact: David Eve

Reference:

Bone Marrow Contributes Simultaneously to Different Neural Types in the Central Nervous System Through Different Mechanisms of Plasticity
Recio, J. S.; Álvarez-Dolado, M.; Díaz, D.; Baltanás, F. C.; Piquer-Gil, M.; Alonso, J. R.; Werunga, E.
Cell Transplant. 20(8):1179-1192; 2011

CellNEWS: Bone Marrow-derived Cells Differentiate in the Brain through Mechanisms of Plasticity.

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